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Primary website:
newyorker.com
Primary Twitter:
@newyorker

The New Yorker is a weekly literary magazine that includes journalism, essays, criticism, fiction, poetry and cartoons. It is owned by magazine publisher Conde Nast, a division of Advance Publications, the media company of the Newhouse family.

Founded in 1925, The New Yorker has been regarded as one of America’s premier literary periodicals. Beginning in the mid-20th century, it began publishing fiction and nonfiction by some of the era’s most respected writers.

The magazine has been edited since 1998 by David Remnick, who has emphasized in-depth reporting, especially regarding the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and the struggle over terrorism.

The magazine consistently lost money from the 1980s through the mid-2000s, but has generally operated at a slight profit since then. Its circulation topped 1 million in the early 2000s and has risen 23 percent since Remnick’s arrival.

The New Yorker’s website has historically been primarily intended to generate print subscriptions to the magazine, which has a print circulation of close to 1 million. Much of the magazine’s content, as well as its archives, are available only to subscribers, though the website includes a significant amount of free online-only content, including podcasts, videos, blogs and audio slideshows. In 2014, the magazine relaunched its website and announced it would launch a metered paywall later that year, preceded by three months of free archives.

The magazine significantly expanded its web operation in late 2011, growing its web staff to 12 employees. As of mid-2014, its traffic had grown from 3 million to 10 million monthly unique visitors with a heavy emphasis on social and mobile media. In 2013, it hired former BuzzFeed staffer Matt Buchanan and announced plans to expand its verticals into business, science, and technology. It launched a science and tech vertical in April 2013, along with new books and humor verticals around the same time. It also moved into native advertising in 2013.

The magazine launched a paid digital edition in 2008, as well as a subscription-based iPad edition. It was also made available for subscription on the Google Android-power Samsung Galaxy tablet in May 2011 as part of a “digital newsstand” project by a consortium of magazine publishers called Next Issue Media.

In July 2011, it reported 100,000 iPad readers, including 20,000 who subscribed solely to the iPad edition. It also launched a free “Goings On” iPhone and Android app in August 2011 and an iPhone app of the magazine, free for subscribers and paid for others, in August 2012. The magazine has also experimented with e-books and other paid digital compilations.

The New Yorker introduced Strongbox, a Tor-based leak submission system designed by Kevin Poulsen and Aaron Swartz, in 2013.

Peers, allies, & competitors:
Recent Nieman Lab coverage:
Aug. 1, 2014 / Mark Coddington
This Week in Review: Covering war in real time, and evaluating a pair of plagiarism cases — Covering war in a social media environment: Much of the news over the past few weeks has taken place in war zones (or near-war zones) with action quickly moving from one crisis to the next. That’s put the journal...
May 17, 2013 / Mark Coddington
This Week in Review, Spy vs. Spy edition: Backlash against snooping by DOJ and Bloomberg — Outrage at seizure of AP records: The journalism and media world was collectively seething in a way you don’t often see this week after the Associated Press revealed that the U.S. Department of Justice had secretly...
May 16, 2013 / Caroline O'Donovan
The New Yorker launches Strongbox. What are the experts saying? — On Wednesday, the New Yorker launched a Tor- and open-source-based file-sharing tool/tip line called Strongbox meant to allow sources to communicate information to the magazine without fear of it being traced back to the...
Aug. 3, 2012 / Mark Coddington
This Week in Review: NBC’s tape-delay economics, and Twitter’s free-speech crossroads — Plus: The fallout from WikiLeaks' hoax, the rise and fall of Jonah Lehrer, and the rest of the week's media and tech news....
April 4, 2012 / Ken Doctor
The newsonomics of the Next Issue magazine future — The magazine industry's agreed on a Netflix-like all-you-can-eat model for some of its top titles. Is it a model that can work — for magazines or for newspapers?...

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Primary author: Mark Coddington. Main text last updated: July 31, 2014.
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Seattle PostGlobe logo

The Seattle PostGlobe was a nonprofit online news organization that focused on journalism about social justice. The PostGlobe was founded in 2009 by former Seattle Post-Intelligencer journalists after the newspaper went online-only in March 2009. It announced its closing in July 2011. The site’s staff worked primarily as volunteers, though the site was funded largely by…

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