Nieman Foundation at Harvard
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Facebook’s attempts to fight fake news seem to be working. (Twitter’s? Not so much.)
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Stories on Audience & Social

Plus: How YouTubers spread far-right beliefs (don’t just blame algorithms), and another cry for less both-sides journalism.
We analyzed the data of groups as large as 40,000 members and as small as 300, from international organizations to local publishers. How does yours fit in?
Should one partisan news outlet be able to wield power over another, using Facebook as the cudgel?
“One of my fears when we started was that there wouldn’t be enough topics, but it’s safe to say that’s not a concern.”
Facebook: “Sociopath,” “bipolar,” “uncool uncle,” “midlife crisis.” WhatsApp: “Best friend,” “sociable,” “fun,” “honest.”
Forty-two percent of Democrats say the news they get on social media has helped their understanding of current events, compared to 24 percent of Republicans who say the same thing.
“Any human being that would put an eye on it would be able to say this is not political propaganda. This is really fair and well-documented journalism. It should not be confused.”
Plus: Who tweets anti-vaccine content, and watch out for “misinfodemics.”