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The New York Times Magazine wants to send you on an audio “voyage,” featuring bats, rats, and volcanos
Plus: The real-world impact of true-crime shows, Serial prepares its return, and an NBC podcast built around an Instagram account.
By Nicholas Quah
We’re getting closer to the day when news apps and interactives can be easily preserved in perpetuity
Well, maybe not easily, but an NYU team is building a tool to save the entirety of a news app (including underlying libraries and frameworks), as well as a digital repository to hold them for future audiences.
By Shan Wang
Alphabet soup: Will the merger of PRX and PRI shift the competitive landscape of public radio (and podcasting)?
Plus: A wave of new releases for the fall, an up-and-down week for My Favorite Murder, and SB Nation goes big on local sports podcasts.
By Nicholas Quah
WhatsApp is a black box of viral misinformation — but in Brazil, 24 newsrooms are teaming up to fact-check it
And unlike previous efforts, WhatsApp is giving the fact-checkers an important tool to reach the public more easily.
By Shan Wang
With “Your Feed,” The New York Times lets iOS users follow topics and journalists (in a non-overwhelming way)
In user research, The New York Times found that “following” topics and specific journalists was a top request. So it built “Your Feed.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Where should the daily news podcast go from here? (Can we get away from “the commute”?)
“There’s just this prevailing, unshakeable feeling that everybody’s drilling for oil in the same spot because some other guy found oil there already.”
By Nicholas Quah
12 prototypes, eight weeks, and lots of tapping: What’s worked (and hasn’t) in the BBC’s quest for new storytelling formats
A highlight in an article that reveals context when it’s clicked. A video with a scrollable transcript that speeds up or reverses the video, too. A movie trailer–like intro, drawing readers into the setup of the story. Which ones worked?
By Christine Schmidt
Netflix helped propel this podcast from a canceled show to a six-figure success
Plus: A big fat Leonard Lopate debacle at WBAI, “podcasts by women, for everyone, no creeps allowed,” and publishers are building teams around smart speakers.
By Nicholas Quah
Wilson FM, which aims to “elevate podcast aesthetics,” is the first exciting podcast app in a long while
“I’ve always had a soft spot for print design and aesthetics that have a point of view or opinion. But I’ve been working in tech for quite some time and am just tired of this A/B-tested, data-proven, metric-driven design.”
By Nicholas Quah
Dog-eared MP3s: The podcast and book publishing industries are finding new ways to cross-pollinate
Plus: S-Town gets sued, Spotlight goes audio, and a remarkable new podcast player named Wilson FM.
By Nicholas Quah
Enough with the “Netflix for audio.” Podcast companies should take a cue from meditation apps instead
There’s a lot that subscription on-demand audio gambits can learn from the increasingly formidable world of mindfulness apps.
By Nicholas Quah
RadioPublic opens up a new investment platform so individual users can get a stake
Plus: Civil + podcasts, Anchor’s troublesome TOS, and IAB’s standards.
By Nicholas Quah
Could Google’s new podcast app change the way we understand the Average Podcast Listener?
“It’s pretty damn hard to listen to a podcast, so the kinds of folks who listen to them regularly must really love the thing enough to walk on coals. Google’s new AI-assisted features are designed to cut down the necessity of that intensity.”
By Nicholas Quah
Mobile Majority: How phones are changing news
The New York Times Magazine wants to send you on an audio “voyage,” featuring bats, rats, and volcanos
Plus: The real-world impact of true-crime shows, Serial prepares its return, and an NBC podcast built around an Instagram account.
By Nicholas Quah
We’re getting closer to the day when news apps and interactives can be easily preserved in perpetuity
Well, maybe not easily, but an NYU team is building a tool to save the entirety of a news app (including underlying libraries and frameworks), as well as a digital repository to hold them for future audiences.
Alphabet soup: Will the merger of PRX and PRI shift the competitive landscape of public radio (and podcasting)?
Plus: A wave of new releases for the fall, an up-and-down week for My Favorite Murder, and SB Nation goes big on local sports podcasts.
What We’re Reading
Reynolds Journalism Institute / Madeleine Bair
El Tímpano will pilot a text message distribution and engagement strategy to serve Latino immigrants
“As we talked to community organizers about what approaches they find most effective in reaching Latino immigrants, two strategies came up again and again: in-person engagement and mobile messaging.”
The Information / Wayne Ma and Juro Osawa
Google is developing a news aggregation app for use in China that will comply with the country’s strict censorship laws
“Google is also preparing a mobile app for internet search in China that will comply with local censorship laws, an effort first reported Wednesday by The Intercept. The company is developing the apps in Mountain View where its headquarters are, and mainland China, where it has offices in Shanghai, Beijing and Shenzhen, according to people familiar with the matter.”
Journalism.co.uk / Marcela Kunova
Another app that tries to encourage sharing stories from outside users’ filter bubbles
“News With Friends uses an algorithm which ranks stories based on editorial choices media research company Kaleida observes from leading publishers; through their tools which put stories in context and enable people to compare and contrast views; and via the social features that fuel informed and intimate conversations.”
Digiday / Mark Weiss
Digiday Research: Mobile commerce shows promise for publishers
“73 percent of publisher executives surveyed by Digiday say at least at least 25 percent of their commerce revenues now come from mobile devices.”
Digiday / Kerry Flynn
🤑 How HQ trivia is trying to turn a viral sensation into a media business
HQ’s sole revenue strategy, for now, is akin to a sponsorship where brands pay for game takeovers. For example, NBC paid for a takeover of The Voice. On May 14, HQ players had a chance to win $50,000 and a trip for two to the show’s finale. The Voice game on HQ, which aired at 11:30 p.m. ET, reached 1.4 million players. NBC’s ratings for 18- to 34-year-olds, as well as viewers aged 12 to 17, was the best for a Monday episode since the first live show of the season, evp of digital for NBC Entertainment Rob Hayes said.
Digiday / Sahil Patel
Half of Telemundo’s live digital viewers for the World Cup are watching on mobile devices
“The NBCUniversal broadcaster, which has Spanish-language rights to air every World Cup game in the U.S., said between 48 and 51 percent of its live digital viewers consistently watch the games on their smartphones. The other half flips between connected TV and desktop streaming, said Peter Blacker, evp of digital media and emerging business for NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises.”
Digiday / Max Willens
Podcasting keeps inching toward measurement standard, but is reluctant to deal with the short-term pain
“Transitioning to the IAB’s standard has caused a ‘double-digit percentage’ drop in downloads for many of its shows, Wondery said. That hit is slowing the transition that both producers and ad buyers say is necessary to attract more ad dollars. ‘It is the right thing to do,’ Wondery CEO Hernan Lopez said. ‘We certainly hope agencies will notice we’re taking the first step.'”
NPR / Elizabeth Jensen
You call that breaking news?: NPR’s public editor on the increasing frequency of push notifications
“NPR puts alerts into two categories: Breaking news that subscribers need to know now and feature alerts, which cover investigative work and original reporting that NPR wants to highlight, as well as live event coverage and new podcasts or programs. (New programming alerts are supposed to be “rare and far between,” per the guidelines.)”
The Hollywood Reporter
Vox Media chief Jim Bankoff on the future of digital media and his Hollywood ambitions
Q: What’s an area of growth for Vox Media? A: Podcasting.
Wall Street Journal / Benjamin Mullin
With $40 Million, podcast upstart Luminary Media is building its own platform
Here’s a “Netflix for podcasting” for you: “Unlike most of its competitors, which support their businesses primarily through advertising, Luminary Media’s business plan includes signing users up for a subscription service granting them access to a portfolio of premium podcasts, according to people familiar with the matter.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.