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Higher ed and public radio are enmeshed. So what happens when the culture wars come?
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Archives: February 2012

In experimenting with their awards season product the Times hopes to reach both flyby and hardcore entertainment news readers.
Meat pizza
Clay Johnson likens our fatty media diets to our love of cheap junk food. But he thinks there’s a market opening for higher-quality content.
News apps like The Wall Street Journal’s are showing the potential of immersive, interactive advertising. But most news organizations aren’t in a position to take advantage.
The distinction matters because courts are often more favorable towards search engines in fair use cases.
Dan Kennedy, who’s writing a book about the New Haven Independent, hopes it will reverse its decision to suspend user comments.
In the third and final part of our series on European models of news industry innovation, Ken Doctor looks at a small community publisher in Switzerland that has a local model he’s trying to spread through franchising.
In the second part of our series on European models of news industry innovation, Ken Doctor looks at a Norwegian media company that’s expanded far beyond national borders — and found revenue success with online classifieds.
In the first part of our series on European models of news industry innovation, Ken Doctor looks at a Finnish publisher that’s had success getting print readers to pay for online access.
Winter Symmetry in the Cold Morning ~ Liptov, Slovakia
The company continues to argue that philosophy, not socioeconomic status, determines a customer’s willingness to pay for news.
When NPR shared links to KPLU stories on its Facebook page — only visible to people in the Seattle area — the station’s website got record traffic.