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In a corner of Brazil, local reporters are switching to government jobs and the state is achieving “media capture”
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June 19, 2013, 11:01 a.m.
LINK: www.tandfonline.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Caroline O'Donovan   |   June 19, 2013

“New perspectives from the sky,” a study by Dr. Mark Tremayne and Andrew Clark published in Digital Journalism, can help you with that.

The two University of Texas at Arlington researchers lay out eight case studies of drone use, from tornado coverage to paparazzi to self-surveillance and the Occupy movement.

The eight cases identified raise a host of legal, ethical and moral questions which were raised in this report. As previous research on surveillance technologies has suggested, UAVs equipped with cameras will further blur the public–private distinctions understood by earlier eras (Ford 2011; Thompson 2011). How will the public react? Interestingly, the answer is not obvious. Technologies that seem intrusive to some are readily accepted by others, especially when they have become accustomed to surveillance or feel some remaining degree of control (Humphreys 2011; Meyrowitz 2009). The right to privacy has been diminishing over the past 100 years due to issues such as the growth of government, the growth of the mass media and technological innovations that make it possible to see and hear things that would not have been possible even a few years ago.

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In a corner of Brazil, local reporters are switching to government jobs and the state is achieving “media capture”
A strategy of “capturing the main professionals from the newspapers, in their respective fields of work, and thus reduce the tensions of being disturbed by the journalists every single day.” “Memory is crucial for journalism, and we are losing it.”
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How are paywalled news outlets preparing to serve residents in California’s mega-power shutoffs?
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