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July 11, 2013, 11:12 a.m.
Mobile & Apps
LINK: allthingsd.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Justin Ellis   |   July 11, 2013

Over at All Things D, Peter Kafka breaks down an interesting new report that includes a look at how consumers are connecting their tablets to the web:

Analyst Craig Moffett spells it out in a recent research report on the telco industry: Only 20 percent of tablets are sold with wireless chipsets. And only half of those devices are initially connected to wireless networks.
And Moffett guesstimates that perhaps half of that number end up disconnecting their wireless subscriptions (which is what happened in my focus group of one). Which would mean that only one in 20 tablets are connected to a wireless data plan.

Given the choice, most folks would rather rely on their own home network or search out wifi elsewhere over paying for a data plan. For media companies, that might mean shifting news and other offerings from the on-the-go model of the phone to something that lets readers lean-back or catch up.

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