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March 13, 2014, 9:30 a.m.
Business Models
LINK: www.pressgazette.co.uk  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   March 13, 2014

Perhaps the ultimate symbol of newspapers’ move from mass to elite: The Times (of London) is launching a wealth management service for its readers.

This week The Times and Sunday Times launches a new wealth management service — offering readers the opportunity to invest in a range of products such as ISAs, SIPPs, funds and Investment Trusts, together with access to expert advice and all at competitive rates.

Times Wealth Management offers a clear, trustworthy and personalised service whether readers are planning for retirement, looking to save for university fees, build a nest egg as first time investors or if they are existing investors who are seeking to improve the way their portfolio is managed.

[…]

Neil Martin, Business Development Director at News UK, said: “The launch of Times Wealth Management Services is an exciting milestone for The Times and Sunday Times. When it comes to money, trust is crucial and The Times and Sunday Times have been the papers of record for the latest money, investment and business news and advice for more than two hundred years, thus the titles are well placed to offer a competitive service that our readers are hugely interested in.”

It’s a bit of a cheat, since News Corp’s Times has long been an upmarket paper attracting a disproportionately monied readership, but nonetheless, this may push ahead of the Telegraph’s (significant-revenue-driving) wine store or The Times’ own Whisky Club as a U.K. upmarket marker.

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