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“We all we got”: How Black Twitter steered the spotlight to Shanquella Robinson’s death
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Feb. 25, 2021, 2:23 p.m.
Audience & Social
LINK: 9to5mac.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   February 25, 2021

Can you imagine how great it would be if you got to pay for all of Nieman Lab’s tweets? A feature that Twitter is working on could make that dream a reality: The company said at an analyst event Thursday that it’s developing a feature called “Super Follow,” which would let users charge for tweets and other content, as well as a “communities” feature somewhat like Facebook Groups and increased safety features.

There’s no promised launch date for either of the products, but speculation about how journalists and news organizations could use the tool abounds. Enjoy these tweets while they’re still free!

One interesting question at this point is whether newsrooms will let reporters paywall their tweets and keep the money.

Another question is what news organizations could do with their own Twitter accounts.

Twitter recently acquired the newsletter platform Revue. On Thursday, the same day that Super Follow was announced, New York Times reporter Kevin Roose revealed that he is launching a newsletter on Revue.

There’s also the concern that this move will accelerate a trend toward only low-quality information being free.

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