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Votebeat will cover local election administration as a permanent newsroom
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Votebeat will cover local election administration as a permanent newsroom
“How do you produce journalism that strengthens elections? That’s the question that runs through my mind every day.”
By Sarah Scire
Hype is a weaponized form of optimism
Want to know the true value of AI, NFTs, and other much-touted technologies? Ignore the news and look at the harsh judgment of the market.
By Lee Vinsel and Jeffrey Funk
For print newspapers, one Florida retirement community is a better market than Atlanta, St. Louis, or Portland
For local newspapers, print circulation has collapsed for every audience except retirees. That’s why the daily paper in The Villages, Florida (metro population 129,752) prints as many copies as the one in Atlanta (metro population 6,930,423).
By Joshua Benton
The Tributary, covering Florida’s largest city, will be a worker-directed nonprofit
Staffers will take part in making collective decisions about the organization, from hiring and compensation to developing the budget, along with their journalistic work.
By Hanaa' Tameez
The Los Angeles Times gets a fully staffed “burner account”
The first-of-its-kind team is offering “views, vibes, and commentary.”
By Sarah Scire
The Washington Post wants to give you a good deal on a digital subscription — from now until 2072
Anyone who tells you they know what digital news will look like in 50 years is lying. But the Post — with an owner rich enough to allow a decades-long time horizon — says it’ll still only cost you $50 a year.
By Joshua Benton
Meet the fact-checkers decoding Sri Lanka’s meltdown
Using public documents and crowdsourced data, supported by shoe-leather reporting, Watchdog hopes to arm citizens with information that can effect real change.
By Nilesh Christopher
Facebook looks ready to divorce the news industry, and I doubt couples counseling will help
Out of every 1,000 times someone sees a post on Facebook, how many of them include a link to a news site? Four. No wonder Facebook doesn’t want to write publishers big checks anymore.
By Joshua Benton
“Facebook has taken over”: How residents find local info when local newspapers aren’t doing the job
“A lot of it’s trash, to be honest, but a lot of it’s very useful.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
When student loans and the housing crisis force journalists out of the business
“Is our compensation structure fundamentally unjust because we pay primarily for experience and skills, with no consideration for need?”
By Wendi C. Thomas
Loans got me into journalism. Student debt pushed me out.
“My journalism degree was more expensive than my wealthier classmates’ degrees because I couldn’t afford to pay in cash. But that’s a common theme with American systems. Poor people pay high prices. Rich people get discounts.”
By Carrington J. Tatum
Votebeat will cover local election administration as a permanent newsroom
“How do you produce journalism that strengthens elections? That’s the question that runs through my mind every day.”
By Sarah Scire
Hype is a weaponized form of optimism
Want to know the true value of AI, NFTs, and other much-touted technologies? Ignore the news and look at the harsh judgment of the market.
For print newspapers, one Florida retirement community is a better market than Atlanta, St. Louis, or Portland
For local newspapers, print circulation has collapsed for every audience except retirees. That’s why the daily paper in The Villages, Florida (metro population 129,752) prints as many copies as the one in Atlanta (metro population 6,930,423).
What We’re Reading
Axios / Sara Fischer
Wired’s union threatens to strike on Amazon Prime Days (July 12 and 13)
“We’ve been asking for exactly the same terms that the New Yorker writers got in their contract, but Condé Nast won’t even discuss this with us.”
Pew Research Center / Mark Jurkowitz and Jeffrey Gottfried
Twitter is the go-to social media site for U.S. journalists, but not for the public
“Around seven-in-ten U.S. journalists (69%) say it is the social media site they use most or second most for their job. Twitter is followed by Facebook at 52%.”
Substack / Chris Mohney
What we talk about when we talk about people talking about people talking
“The fact is, having now conducted, edited, and published hundreds of as-told-to and Q &A interviews, I’ve never had a single objection about journalistic accuracy or veracity from an interview subject about what they actually said.”
The Texas Tribune / Sewell Chan
Since 2005, Texas has lost more newspaper journalists per capita than all but two other states
“Only California and New Jersey have lost more newspaper journalists, relative to population.”
Lenfest Institute for Journalism / Shawn Mooring
How The Lenfest Institute is measuring impact in the Philadelphia media ecosystem
“Over the past year, we’ve developed a series of metrics we’re measuring to track success, hold ourselves accountable, and share what we’re learning with our partners and the broader community.”
Vox / Terry Nguyen
Brands want to be more than your friend. They want community.
“The promise of community begins to feel disingenuous when what’s described is little more than a euphemism for a targeted demographic of interested consumers.”
The New York Times / Jeremy W. Peters
First Amendment confrontation may loom in post-Roe fight
“Let’s say you’re deliberately advertising in a Texas newspaper and say, ‘Would you like an abortion? Go to this New Mexico abortion clinic.’ Can Texas prohibit that?”
Broadcasting Cable / Michael Malone
CBS launches a joint investigation between news, stations, and streaming
“It’s a way to really get underneath a story locally and nationally.”
Washington Post / Glenn Kessler
The fact-checking movement grapples with a world awash in false claims
“A fact isolated from context, whether it’s true or false, is almost meaningless. You have to explain it or tell it as part of a story.”
Nieman Reports / Karolis Vyšniauskas
“We should side with democracy”: Why the war in Ukraine is existential for Baltic journalists
“Competition in the Baltic media is generally fierce. But a new trend has emerged: solidarity. Almost all major news channels across all three countries have changed their logos to blue and yellow — the colors of the Ukrainian flag.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.