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What’s up with all the news photos that make beaches look like Covid hotspots?
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What’s up with all the news photos that make beaches look like Covid hotspots?
Plus: All misinformation is local; a very specific kind of Covid-19 misinformation in Facebook parent groups; and “religious clickbait.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
In the arena: Ken Doctor is moving from “media analyst” to “media CEO” with Lookout, his plan for quality local news
Lookout doesn’t want its local news sites to be a supplement or alternative to the local daily. They aim to be the news source of record in their communities, outgunning their shrunken newsprint rivals from Day 1.
By Joshua Benton
People who engage with false news are hyper-concerned about truth. But they think it’s being hidden.
“On Google, searching for ‘coronavirus facts’ gives you a full overview of official statistics and visualizations. That’s not the case for ‘coronavirus truth.'”
By Tommy Shane
It continues to be very good to be The New York Times
It now makes more revenue from digital than from print and continues to add new subscribers at a record pace. But its brutal COVID-driven drop in advertising will be echoed all across the industry.
By Joshua Benton
One year after India cracked down on Kashmir, The Kashmir Walla turns to membership to survive
“People don’t just pay for the product and the content. People pay for the idea behind it and the credibility. There’s a good will among the people to support independent journalism in Kashmir.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
Evoking empathy or seeking solidarity: Which is preferable when covering people without homes?
Plus: How journalists cover global infectious disease, how audiences think news organizations should improve trust, and “news minimalists and omnivores.”
By Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis
Lots of visible likes and shares on social lead people to spread more misinformation
When people saw that a questionable piece of content had been liked and shared lots of times, they were more likely to share it themselves
By Laura Hazard Owen
How much does fake coronavirus news affect people’s real-life health behavior?
And what about Trump’s hydroxychloroquine and bleach proclamations?
By Laura Hazard Owen
An open letter to the new CEO of The New York Times
Meredith Kopit Levien, everyone seems to agree, is the right person to lead the Times into the 2020s. But here’s hoping she’ll view her mission more broadly — including the state of local news in America.
By Joshua Benton
Newsonomics: The New York Times’ new CEO, Meredith Levien, on building a world-class digital media business — and a tech company
“Engineering now is the second largest functional area at the New York Times, only behind journalism, and the largest function by far on the business side.”
By Ken Doctor
South Africa’s Oxpeckers is powering up geo-journalism for investigative environmental reporting
Now, expanding beyond its home base in southern Africa, Oxpeckers has been developing new tools to cover the illegal wildlife trade.
By Gregory Francois and Shruti Kedia
What’s up with all the news photos that make beaches look like Covid hotspots?
Plus: All misinformation is local; a very specific kind of Covid-19 misinformation in Facebook parent groups; and “religious clickbait.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
In the arena: Ken Doctor is moving from “media analyst” to “media CEO” with Lookout, his plan for quality local news
Lookout doesn’t want its local news sites to be a supplement or alternative to the local daily. They aim to be the news source of record in their communities, outgunning their shrunken newsprint rivals from Day 1.
People who engage with false news are hyper-concerned about truth. But they think it’s being hidden.
“On Google, searching for ‘coronavirus facts’ gives you a full overview of official statistics and visualizations. That’s not the case for ‘coronavirus truth.'”
What We’re Reading
Chicago Tribune / Ryan Ori
Since March, Tribune Publishing ended eight leases and hasn’t made rent payments at most of its other properties
As part of the newspaper company’s downsizing, The Chicago Tribune’s offices could move for the second time in less than three years.
University of Oregon / Damian Radcliffe
Survey: What is it like to be a local newspaper journalist in 2020?
“We want to hear about the experiences of local journalists and people working at local newspapers across the United States. The survey is entirely optional and will take approximately 8-12 minutes.”
The Salt Lake Tribune / By Tony Semerad
Salt Lake Tribune editor Jennifer Napier-Pearce resigns over differences with the newspaper’s chief philanthropic partner
Napier-Pearce led the newspaper through a closely-watched transition to nonprofit status in 2019.
Poynter / Eliana Miller
BBC News
Twitter will label state-controlled news accounts and exclude them from its recommendation systems
Russia’s RT and China’s Xinhua News will both be affected by the change. Publicly funded news organizations with editorial independence, like the BBC and NPR, will not be labelled.
Center for Media Engagement / Natalie Jomini Stroud, Caroline Murray, and Alex Curry
Adding humanizing details to news articles produces mixed results
“Adding humanizing details about sources to news articles covering controversial topics did not affect readers’ perceptions of people with opposing views or the news organization’s credibility. Watching videos of people sharing personal stories related to a political issue increased conservatives’ favorability toward people with opposing views. However, exposure to the videos did not affect liberals’ attitudes.”
American Press Institute / Andrew Rockway, John Hernandez, and Joy Mayer
Nine tips for covering election misinformation
“Repeat critical accurate information that voters will need frequently. Voters are overloaded with information, often conflicting. It’s helpful, after you provide accurate, relevant information, to repeat it frequently in stories and place it online in places where users will easily find it. Jonathan Lai of the Philadelphia Inquirer has set up an automated tweet every morning to relay deadlines for registering to vote and request absentee ballots, with information on how to do so.
The Washington Post / Elahe Izadi and Paul Farhi
A public radio station was already in turmoil. Then its own news site dropped an explosive report.
“Washington’s popular NPR affiliate, WAMU, sought to expand its regional news operations in early 2018 when it acquired DCist, a local news site that had recently shut down. The station pumped money and resources into the operation, reviving the website that had been a mainstay in the local news ecosystem since it launched in 2004. Two years later, it was DCist that published a blockbuster story detailing sexual harassment allegations against a former WAMU staffer that has rocked the organization.”
The New York Times / Cecilia Kang and Sheera Frenkel
Facebook removes Trump campaign’s misleading coronavirus video
Trump falsely claimed children were “virtually immune” to the coronavirus. It was the first time Facebook has removed a Trump video, “saying the post violated its policies specifically tailored for health misinformation around the coronavirus.”
MediaPost / Fern Siegel
The Texas Observer and Oxford American are partnering on a regional newsletter series
“Editors of both publications are contributing to the eight-week newsletter South/WEST,” which launched this week.
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.