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You’re more likely to believe fake news shared by someone you barely know than by your best friend
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Stories on Audience & Social

“It’s quite lazy to say that young people don’t care about news.”
Plus: How AI exacerbates the news industry’s reliance on Big Tech, how Elon Musk’s takeover of Twitter led to “strategic disconnection,” and why journalism educators need to talk more about hostility.
“We already expect quite a lot from the public in terms of media literacy to be able to navigate the contemporary information environment; the use of these technologies in news adds a whole other layer to that.”
“While you’re less at the whim of the algorithm, it’s still social media.”
“No single variable is more predictive of whether someone consistently avoids news than their level of interest in politics and civic affairs.”
Few newspapers still employ full-time cartoonists. But some digital outlets are turning to the art form.
“Because publicly funded educational institutions are committed to promoting informed debate and preparing the nation’s future citizens, my colleagues and I believe they remain some of the most promising places to try this approach.”
Plus: Silent corrections to stories, how viral videos draw attention to right-wing news, and journalists’ (somewhat) like-minded Twitter networks.
Independent outlets explain how traffic and engagement have plummeted overnight after Meta blocked news from its platforms.
We talked to the Financial Times, La Nación, The New York Times, Vox, Chilango, the Times of India, and others about their early experiments sharing news on the world’s favorite messaging app.