Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Did Facebook’s faulty data push news publishers to make terrible decisions on video?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 21, 2013, 2:44 p.m.
LINK: www.knightfoundation.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Justin Ellis   |   May 21, 2013

Thanks to new funding from Knight Foundation, the Internet Archive is expanding its collection of TV news broadcasts. The archive also plans to build a better search and user experience around the clips, which can only be viewed online and not downloaded.

The expansion plan is being supported by $1 million in funding from Knight Foundation. With this support, we will grow our TV News Search & Borrow service, which currently includes more than 400,000 broadcasts dating back to June 2009, to add hundreds of thousands of new broadcasts. This means helping inform and engage communities by strengthening the work of journalists, scholars, teachers, librarians, documentarians, civic organizations and others dedicated to public benefit.With TV News Search & Borrow, these folks can use closed captioning that accompany news programs to search for information. They can then browse short-streamed video clips and share links to specific ones.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 45,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Did Facebook’s faulty data push news publishers to make terrible decisions on video?
Publishers’ “pivot to video” was driven largely by a belief that if Facebook was seeing users, in massive numbers, shift to video from text, the trend must be real.
Civil’s token sale has failed. Now what? Refunds, for one thing — and then another sale
“For those who purchased tokens, first of all, thank you. We’ll offer full refunds.”
Where are the weeklies? Still kicking, Penelope Abernathy’s news desert report says
Of the 1,800 newspapers lost since 2004, 1,700 of them were weekly papers. But it’s not because their audience disappeared — it’s because the papers did.