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Outgoing New York Times CEO Mark Thompson thinks there won’t be a print edition in 20 years
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Outgoing New York Times CEO Mark Thompson thinks there won’t be a print edition in 20 years
Also, the Times now reaches about half of American millennials.
By Sarah Scire
How do you run a fun membership drive in sad pandemic times? Maximum Fun has some ideas
Plus: What Spotify wants premium advertising to sound like, claims of systemic racism at PRX, BBC pushes for podcast audiences in Africa, and can Serial stay special?
By Nicholas Quah
People are using Facebook and Instagram as search engines. During a pandemic, that’s dangerous.
Data voids on social networks are spreading misinformation and causing real world harm. Here are some ideas on how to fix the problem.
By Tommy Shane
What’s up with all the news photos that make beaches look like Covid hotspots?
Plus: All misinformation is local; a very specific kind of Covid-19 misinformation in Facebook parent groups; and “religious clickbait.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
In the arena: Ken Doctor is moving from “media analyst” to “media CEO” with Lookout, his plan for quality local news
Lookout doesn’t want its local news sites to be a supplement or alternative to the local daily. They aim to be the news source of record in their communities, outgunning their shrunken newsprint rivals from Day 1.
By Joshua Benton
People who engage with false news are hyper-concerned about truth. But they think it’s being hidden.
“On Google, searching for ‘coronavirus facts’ gives you a full overview of official statistics and visualizations. That’s not the case for ‘coronavirus truth.'”
By Tommy Shane
It continues to be very good to be The New York Times
It now makes more revenue from digital than from print and continues to add new subscribers at a record pace. But its brutal COVID-driven drop in advertising will be echoed all across the industry.
By Joshua Benton
One year after India cracked down on Kashmir, The Kashmir Walla turns to membership to survive
“People don’t just pay for the product and the content. People pay for the idea behind it and the credibility. There’s a good will among the people to support independent journalism in Kashmir.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
Evoking empathy or seeking solidarity: Which is preferable when covering people without homes?
Plus: How journalists cover global infectious disease, how audiences think news organizations should improve trust, and “news minimalists and omnivores.”
By Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis
Lots of visible likes and shares on social lead people to spread more misinformation
When people saw that a questionable piece of content had been liked and shared lots of times, they were more likely to share it themselves
By Laura Hazard Owen
Outgoing New York Times CEO Mark Thompson thinks there won’t be a print edition in 20 years
Also, the Times now reaches about half of American millennials.
By Sarah Scire
How do you run a fun membership drive in sad pandemic times? Maximum Fun has some ideas
Plus: What Spotify wants premium advertising to sound like, claims of systemic racism at PRX, BBC pushes for podcast audiences in Africa, and can Serial stay special?
People are using Facebook and Instagram as search engines. During a pandemic, that’s dangerous.
Data voids on social networks are spreading misinformation and causing real world harm. Here are some ideas on how to fix the problem.
What We’re Reading
Medium / Mollie Leavitt
Grist has grown its membership by 94% in the past year
The nonprofit climate news site now has about 6,000 paying subscribers, CEO Brady Piñero Walkinshaw said in a Q&A. The vast majority — 90 percent — of the site’s revenue still comes from foundations and major donors.
Axios / Sara Fischer
Facebook will stop including political content disguised as local news in their Facebook News tab
Thousands of outlets backed by political groups have been pushing biased stories disguised as non-partisan local news on the platform. Now, groups with “direct, meaningful ties” to political groups will be held to the same standard as political entities when it comes to advertising on the platform.
Nieman Reports / Casey Quackenbush
“Collaboration is the future of journalism”
“When it comes to accessing overlooked communities, collaborations are key, says Gallardo. ‘All of my work in the classroom and at ProPublica is collaborative,’ says Gallardo. ‘If my students’ goals are to reach communities often ignored by newsrooms and/or to build ambitious deep-dives, I can’t imagine teaching them any other way to get the work done.'”
Axios / Sara Fischer
The New York Times is exploring Wirecutter subscriptions, a job listing suggests
“The role calls for a director of marketing ‘to drive the strategy and go-to-market execution of its future consumer subscription product.’ David Perpich, head of standalone products at The Times, confirmed the effort to Axios.”
The Daily Beast / Maxwell Tani
The civil war tearing Sports Illustrated apart
“Instead of using photos from its massive archive spanning 65 years, for the moment Sports Illustrated has been forced to primarily use images provided by wire services or shot after the magazine’s sale. This latest Maven-related problem has proven especially embarrassing and depressing for some staffers, who pointed out that Sports Illustrated’s original innovation was to print strikingly colorful sports photographs starting in the 1960s.”
AP
Iran shutters newspaper after expert questions virus numbers
“Iran shut down a newspaper on Monday after it published remarks by an expert who said the official figures on coronavirus cases and deaths in the country account for only 5% of the real toll, allegations rejected by the Health Ministry.”
The Washington Post / Margaret Sullivan
With Biden likely to pick a Black woman as VP, here’s how the media can avoid playing into sexist and racist tropes
“News organizations should be constantly asking themselves, ‘How are stories framed? What language is used? Are we reinforcing unconscious stereotypes?'”
The Guardian / Julia Carrie Wong
Revealed: QAnon Facebook groups are growing at a rapid pace around the world
“The Guardian has documented more than 170 QAnon groups, pages and accounts across Facebook and Instagram with more than 4.5 million aggregate followers. The Guardian has also documented dedicated communities for QAnon followers in at least 15 countries on Facebook. The growth in the QAnon Facebook communities has come as rival social media platform Twitter undertook a broad crackdown on content and accounts dedicated to the conspiracy theory…At the time of Twitter’s crackdown, anonymous sources told The New York Times that Facebook was planning to take ‘similar steps’ at some point this month. In the meantime, Facebook’s recommendation algorithm has continued to promote QAnon groups to users and some groups have experienced explosive growth.”
The Wall Street Journal / Anne Steele
Meet the woman who got Michelle Obama and Joe Rogan to Spotify
“In her current role, Ms. Ostroff has pushed podcasters to innovate in various ways, such as urging Parcast’s Mr. Cutler to produce a daily, narrative true-crime podcast—a previously unheard-of tempo for the genre, which tends to be costly and requires a large production team. A crime junkie herself, Ms. Ostroff said she is now an avid listener of Parcast’s Today in True Crime.”
Variety / Kevin Tran
“Hamilton” reached 37 percent of U.S. households in July, three times more than anything on Netflix
Disney CEO Bob Chapek told employees that Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical brought in “a lot of” new subs for Disney+ shortly after the musical’s July 3 debut. (The platform has not released hard numbers for its streaming titles.)
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.