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The Kansas City Defender is a nonprofit news site for young Black audiences across the Midwest
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The Kansas City Defender is a nonprofit news site for young Black audiences across the Midwest
“We do advocate against the racist function of policing, [but] we focus equally on being present in the community, doing poetry nights, basketball park takeovers, and other community-building, life-affirming activities.”
By James Anderson
Cable news has a much bigger effect on America’s polarization than social media, study finds
“Compared to online audiences, partisan TV news consumers tend not to stray too far from their narrow sets of preferred news sources.”
By Homa Hosseinmardi
Doing a little word puzzle as the world burns
“I started playing word games as a way to stop reading the news first thing in the morning.”
By Lyz Lenz
“Puzzles pair well with reading the news”: Why news outlets are getting into games (again)
“Some subscribers would rather game than sift through the wreckage. Can you blame them?”
By Luke Winkie
Axios sells for $525 million, to a company that seemed to be getting out of the media business
Atlanta-based Cox Enterprises has spent the past decade selling off most of its media properties as it brings in billions from cable. So why dive back in?
By Joshua Benton
Canada’s Online News Act shows how other countries are learning from Australia’s news bill
The potential here is for democratic governments to evolve their digital policy models based on each other’s experiences.
By Taylor Owen and Supriya Dwivedi
Blame Craig: How Facebook’s AI bot explains the decline of the news industry
“Definitely craigslist…. I don’t know that facebook is really to blame for anything specific.” And maybe the Pope did endorse Trump after all!
By Joshua Benton
The Pink Sauce debacle is the logical next step of the “Instagrammable” movement
Pink Sauce may be a sign that we’ve reached the next phase in an internet culture that has privileged aesthetic over function for years.
By Jessica Maddox
“Space is for everyone”: Meet the scientists trying to put otherworldly images into words
“It is a lot like science writing in general. You need to have a very good understanding of the content.”
By Sarah Scire
“A bigger focus on the human impact of technology”: Sisi Wei is The Markup’s new editor-in-chief
“What we often don’t think about is how tech accountability is also so many other types of coverage. It’s labor coverage, climate change coverage, healthcare coverage, criminal justice coverage, immigration coverage — I could go on and on.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
“Number soup”: Can we make it easier for readers to digest all the numbers journalists stuff into their stories?
“Numbers do not speak for themselves. All the same, many people believe that they do. An ideology we call numerism, which accords a privileged epistemic status to quantification, is widespread.”
By Joshua Benton
Two new bots can help newsrooms prioritize accessibility and alt text
“If accessibility is only pitched as something that’s related to code or only related to computers, it’s going to be real easy for people in newsrooms to distance themselves from that.”
By Holly Rosewood
The next time someone wants your newsroom to “pivot to video,” remember some history
“It’s always journalism that gets sacrificed on the altar of video metrics fakery and BS.”
By Aram Zucker-Scharff
The Kansas City Defender is a nonprofit news site for young Black audiences across the Midwest
“We do advocate against the racist function of policing, [but] we focus equally on being present in the community, doing poetry nights, basketball park takeovers, and other community-building, life-affirming activities.”
By James Anderson
Cable news has a much bigger effect on America’s polarization than social media, study finds
“Compared to online audiences, partisan TV news consumers tend not to stray too far from their narrow sets of preferred news sources.”
Doing a little word puzzle as the world burns
“I started playing word games as a way to stop reading the news first thing in the morning.”
What We’re Reading
New York Times / Jack Healy
In Aspen, it’s the rich developer vs. the local paper
“In Aspen, the dispute has left residents and officials asking whether local journalism could still tell the truth fearlessly and independently in a town with such outsize gaps in wealth, where an average home costs nearly $3 million, small shops are being supplanted by the likes of Gucci and Dior and local workers are being pushed out.”
Marketing Brew / Ryan Barwick and Jenn Brice
Major publishers are buying ads in mobile games like Subway Surfers to juice traffic
“In May, the Los Angeles Times saw 4% of its traffic come from the Jun Group on one specific day … Both TheGrio and Scary Mommy received about 91% and around 61% of their traffic from the Jun Group, on given days, respectively … Further, according to [ad-fraud researchers Rocky] Moss, none of the bid requests he observed from publisher-bought traffic were labeled as rewarded.”
Local News Initiative / Penny Abernathy
A tale of two local news sites
“If digital-only operations are to fill the gap in existing news deserts, then funders and entrepreneurs must begin to address the disparity between the resources available to urban sites compared to those in smaller suburban and rural communities, as well as traditionally underserved urban neighborhoods.”
Vanity Fair / Charlotte Klein
The Washington Post / Tim Starks and Aaron Schaffer
For ransomware gangs, journalists are another tool of the trade
“A problem that a lot of reporters have privately wrestled with is, how do you report this, which is important, without acting as a PR person for the ransomware groups?”
The Berkshire Eagle / Greta Jochem
In search of 90 miles of news, a reporter hits the Appalachian Trail
“I’m going to explore miles and miles of the Berkshires that are rarely traveled by local journalists. And I love being outside.”
Los Angeles Times / Kate Linthicum
“Not even Orwell could have dreamed up a country like this”: Journalists forced to flee Nicaragua en masse
“With virtually no independent media left inside the country and foreign reporters banned from entering, Nicaragua has become ‘an information black hole,’ said Natalie Southwick of the Committee to Protect Journalists. Government propaganda is all that remains.”
The Guardian / Wilfred Chan
Right-wing media embraces AIDS-era homophobia in monkeypox coverage
“I’m about killing the alligator closest to the boat. And right now that means getting information to men who have sex with men about how to avoid this.”
CNET / Oscar Gonzalez
Americans see misleading info daily in search results. So Google is making changes
“Google Search can now understand what is the consensus on a certain query by checking across other sources deemed to be high-quality. Search can also now detect some false premises, the company said.”
The Verge / James Vincent
Facebook begins testing default end-to-end encryption on Messenger
“Facebook has been criticized for not making [end-to-end encryption] default on Messenger, especially in the wake of the reversal of Roe v. Wade in the United States, where digital footprints like app chats will be used as evidence in prosecuting newly criminalized abortions.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.