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The Washington Post launches a year in news à la Spotify Wrapped
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The Washington Post launches a year in news à la Spotify Wrapped
“We initially built a ‘look-back’ experience but pivoted when we learned that our readers are more interested in insights that center on their reading ‘personality’ and content discovery rather than revisiting news from the past.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
How risky is it for journalists to cover protests?
Plus: Exploring why women leave the news industry, the effects of opinion labels, and susceptibility to disinformation.
By Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis
Coming to a Hawaii library near you: Honolulu Civil Beat is hosting pop-up newsrooms around the state
“We learned that people have an interest if they can get to us.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
How the Covid-19 pandemic pushed preprint-based journalism into the mainstream
“Verifying preprints appeared to be a real challenge for journalists, even for those with advanced science education.”
By Alice Fleerackers and Lauren Maggio
Post, the latest Twitter alternative, is betting big on micropayments for news
“What I believe consumers want is to be able to get multiple sources of news in their feed.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Some midterm polls were on target, but finding which pollsters to believe can be tough
The outcomes confirmed anew that election polling is an uneven and high-risk pursuit.
By W. Joseph Campbell
Can Mastodon be a reasonable Twitter substitute for journalists?
Adam Davidson: “I think we got lazy as a field, and we let Mark Zuckerberg, Jack Dorsey, and, god help us, Elon Musk and their staff decide all these major journalistic questions.”
By Julia Angwin, The Markup
11 (and counting) things journalism loses if Elon Musk destroys Twitter
Goodbye to screenshotted best bits, DMs, “that tweet should be a story”…
By Laura Hazard Owen
This German news outlet is teaching people about local politics with an in-person game
“It gives you a much better view on what politics on a local level is, instead of just reading about it or going to a meeting yourself and sitting in as a guest.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
What’s the best way to deal with a flood of misinformation? Maybe it’s time for some deliberate ignorance
“It is only by ignoring the torrent of low-quality information that people can focus on applying critical search skills to the remaining now-manageable pool of potentially relevant information.”
By Joshua Benton
Meta’s layoffs make it official: Facebook is ready to part ways with the news
“Meta had the resources at its peak to do incredible things. Not just the dollars, but the encouragement to think of the best outcome possible, to make the biggest impact we could.”
By Sarah Scire
“We actually go back to the beginning”: After launching in London, the TikTok-focused News Movement comes to the U.S.
“One of our first successful TikTok videos that surpassed over a million views is our explainer of where Ukraine is on a map.”
By Marina Adami
There’s a 68 in 100 chance you’ll read this article about the audience for FiveThirtyEight-style election predictions
In other words, the odds are pretty good — but it’s far from a lock.
By Nicholas Diakopoulos
The Washington Post launches a year in news à la Spotify Wrapped
“We initially built a ‘look-back’ experience but pivoted when we learned that our readers are more interested in insights that center on their reading ‘personality’ and content discovery rather than revisiting news from the past.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
How risky is it for journalists to cover protests?
Plus: Exploring why women leave the news industry, the effects of opinion labels, and susceptibility to disinformation.
Coming to a Hawaii library near you: Honolulu Civil Beat is hosting pop-up newsrooms around the state
“We learned that people have an interest if they can get to us.”
What We’re Reading
Twitter / Ben Mullin
The Washington Post will end its print Sunday magazine
The last issue will be published on Dec. 25 and 10 staff jobs will be cut.
Financial Times / Javier Espinoza, James Politi, Cristina Criddle, and Hannah Murphy
EU warns Musk that Twitter faces ban over content moderation
“The European Commission on Thursday threatened Musk with a ban unless Twitter abides by strict content moderation rules … in the U.S., authorities’ scrutiny of Twitter appears to be focused on foreign ownership of the social media platform.”
The New Yorker / Ronan Farrow
A hacked newsroom brings a spyware maker to U.S. court
“In interviews conducted in the United States and Central America, more than a dozen members of the El Faro newsroom told me that the Pegasus hackings had impaired their ability to work as journalists and maintain sources’ trust. ‘It’s a shitty feeling,’ Óscar Martínez, El Faro’s executive editor, whose phone was infected with Pegasus forty-two times between July, 2020, and October, 2021, told me. ‘Sources, they were very upset with me. And they have the right to be. They just trusted me. And I failed them.'”
Slate / Lizzie O'Leary
The new Wordle editor is ruining Wordle
“When the New York Times announced, on November 7, that Wordle would have an editor, I didn’t give it much thought. How much could the mere presence of a person really change it? Oh, how naive I was!”
The Guardian / Yursa Farzan
What will happen next for Black Twitter?
“Quoting a tweet she saw recently, Klassen hopes that ‘the next place we move to we own and not rent.'”
New York Times / Benjamin Mullin
Layoffs hit CNN as cost-cutting pressure mounts
“In a memo to employees, the network’s chairman Chris Licht said that some people, primarily paid contributors, would be notified of the cuts on Wednesday. Others will be notified on Thursday, Mr. Licht wrote, with additional details to follow that day.”
Bloomberg / Ashley Carman and Gerry Smith
NPR restricts hiring after sharp decline in sponsorship revenue
Facing a $20 million deficit in sponsorship revenue this fiscal year, NPR is “severely restricting” hiring and making budget cuts but apparently isn’t planning layoffs.
ProPublica / Stephen Engelberg
Editor’s Note: A review of criticisms of a ProPublica–Vanity Fair story on a Covid origins report
“We have updated the story to underscore the complexity of interpreting that dispatch. We have added additional context to the story. We have also identified two factual errors inconsequential to the premise of the story. They have been corrected.”
Publishers Weekly
Astra House will shut down its print magazine after just two issues
“In a very difficult year for publishing, we found that the format provided unexpected challenges …” Astra Magazine’s site had attracted 50,000 unique visitors each month.
Digiday / Sara Guaglione
CNBC will test increasing the cost of its Investing Club and CNBC Pro subscriptions next year
A number of publishers are testing subscription prices, Lindsay said, declining to share which ones he was privy to. The New York Times’ president and CEO Meredith Kopit Levien said in the company’s Q3 2022 earnings call that the publisher is considering upping the price of its individual products in the coming months to “drive more people to take our bundle.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.