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Newsweek is making generative AI a fixture in its newsroom
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Newsweek is making generative AI a fixture in its newsroom
The legacy publication is leaning on AI for video production, a new breaking news team, and first drafts of some stories.
By Andrew Deck
Rumble Strip creator Erica Heilman on making independent audio and asking people about class
“I only make unimportant things now, but it’s all the unimportant things that really make up our lives.”
By Neel Dhanesha
PressPad, an attempt to bring some class diversity to posh British journalism, is shutting down
“While there is even more need for this intervention than when we began the project, the initiative needs more resources than the current team can provide.”
By Joshua Benton
Is the Texas Tribune an example or an exception? A conversation with Evan Smith about earned income
“I think risk aversion is the thing that’s killing our business right now.”
By Richard Tofel
The California Journalism Preservation Act would do more harm than good. Here’s how the state might better help news
“If there are resources to be put to work, we must ask where those resources should come from, who should receive them, and on what basis they should be distributed.”
By Jeff Jarvis
“Fake news” legislation risks doing more harm than good amid a record number of elections in 2024
“Whether intentional or not, the legislation we examined created potential opportunities to diminish opposing voices and decrease media freedom — both of which are particularly important in countries holding elections.”
By Samuel Jens
Dateline Totality: How local news outlets in the eclipse’s path are covering the covering
“Celestial events tend to draw highly engaged audiences, and this one is no exception.”
By Sophie Culpepper
The conspiracy-loving Epoch Times is thinking about opening…a journalism school?
It would, um, “champion the same values of ‘truth and traditional’ as The Epoch Times” and, er, “nurture in the next generation of media professionals,” ahem, “the highest standards of personal integrity, fairness, and truth-seeking.”
By Joshua Benton
A newsletter about our uneasy relationship to phones becomes The Guardian’s fastest-growing email ever
“Reclaim Your Brain” acknowledges “the effect that the news cycle is having on us psychologically.”
By Sarah Scire
A new kind of activist journalism: Hunterbrook investigates corporations (and hopes to make bank trading off its reporting)
“We know this may not be seen as traditional journalism, which is generally known for being dispassionate, reliant on inside sources, and indifferent to profitability.”
By Joshua Benton
The Listening Post Collective offers a free road map (and microgrants) for meeting community information needs
“I think sometimes we get stuck in an echo chamber of being around each other a little too much. And I think that can hinder some of this work.”
By Sophie Culpepper
Yo! How a content-free social network briefly fascinated the world (and the news media)
Ten years ago today, a new app arrived to strip the “media” out of social media, reducing messaging to two little letters. It burned bright, but not for long.
By Joshua Benton
Newsweek is making generative AI a fixture in its newsroom
The legacy publication is leaning on AI for video production, a new breaking news team, and first drafts of some stories.
By Andrew Deck
Rumble Strip creator Erica Heilman on making independent audio and asking people about class
“I only make unimportant things now, but it’s all the unimportant things that really make up our lives.”
PressPad, an attempt to bring some class diversity to posh British journalism, is shutting down
“While there is even more need for this intervention than when we began the project, the initiative needs more resources than the current team can provide.”
What We’re Reading
Bloomberg / Souhail Karam
Tunisia jailed a journalist for criticizing the president on social media
“A first instance court sentenced Mohamed Boughalleb, 60, to six months in prison after a civil servant sued him for a social-media post questioning government spending on travel… Some 20 Tunisian reporters are currently facing trial for charges linked to their work, [Tunisian press union SNJT] says.”
The New York Times / Jessica Testa
What is a magazine now?
“‘I believe it’s my responsibility to, like, make sure that young people still dream of being journalists,’ [Highsnobiety EIC Willa Bennett] said. ‘We just need to keep iterating and continuing to stretch what it means.'”
New York Times / Steven Kurutz
From a tiny island in Maine, Today in Tabs serves up fresh media gossip
“Amid the economic gloom, Foster has what many media outlets crave: a devoted readership willing to pay for content. Around 10 percent of his 36,000 subscribers are paying readers, he said, who fork over $6 per month or $50 per year.”
the Guardian
The Guardian has launched a cooking app called Feast
The new app can convert between U.K. and U.S. measurements and features a “cook mode” that prevents your phone from locking. (See: The New York Times hits 10 million subscribers by using non-news products — including NYT Cooking — as an on-ramp.)
Wired / Kate Knibbs
How one author pushed the limits of AI copyright
“The appeal built on Shupe’s argument about her disabilities, saying she should be granted copyright because she used ChatGPT as an assistive technology to communicate, comparing her use of OpenAI’s chatbot to an amputee using a prosthetic leg. The appeal claimed that the U.S. Copyright Office ‘discriminated against her because of her disability.’”
CNN / Hadas Gold
News publishers group urges government to investigate Google for blocking California news outlets
“Google released no further details on how many Californians will be affected, how the Californians who will be denied news access were chosen, what publications will be affected, how long the compelled news blackouts will persist, and whether access will be blocked entirely or just to content Google particularly disfavors. Because of these unknowns, there are many ways Google’s unilateral decision to turn off access to news websites for Californians could violate [various] laws.”
Rest of World / Rest of World
Rest of World launches a global AI election disinformation tracker
“As more than 2 billion people in 50 countries head to the polls this year, AI-generated content is now widely being used to spread misinformation, as well as to confuse and entertain voters. Throughout 2024, Rest of World is tracking the most noteworthy incidents of AI-generated election content globally.”
The Wall Street Journal / Alexandra Bruell
New York Times ends probe into leak over Gaza coverage without conclusive finding
“The New York Times ended its investigation into whether staffers leaked confidential information about its Gaza war coverage without any conclusive finding, Executive Editor Joe Kahn told staff Monday.”
The Atlantic / Richard Stengel
Democracy dies behind paywalls
“In some ways, this creates a philosophical inconsistency. The paywall says, This content is valuable and you have to pay for it. Suspending the paywall in a crisis says, This content is so valuable that you don’t have to pay for it.”
Financial Times / Daniel Thomas and Anna Nicolaou
CNN’s Mark Thompson wants the cable news network to embark on a digital overhaul
“I don’t think any broadcaster has cracked the code on how to be yourself in terms of digital products. We’ve tended all to go for executions in digital which are rather newspaper-like, [but] consumption of television is very strongly video-led and on platforms like YouTube and TikTok.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.