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U.S. police have attacked journalists more than 120 times since May 28
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U.S. police have attacked journalists more than 120 times since May 28
“Although in some incidents it is possible the journalists were hit or affected accidentally, in the majority of the cases we have recorded the journalists are clearly identifiable as press, and it is clear that they are being deliberately targeted.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Riot or resistance? The way the media frames the unrest in Minneapolis will shape the public’s view of protest
Research finds that protests about anti-black racism and indigenous people’s rights receives the least legitimizing coverage.
By Danielle Kilgo
Unicorn Riot, a nonprofit media collective, is covering the Minneapolis protests live and close up
Unicorn Riot is just five years old, but this week’s unrest isn’t its first time covering protests against a police killing in the Twin Cities.
By Sarah Scire
Twitter adds a new warning to a Trump tweet: “This tweet violated the Twitter Rules about glorifying violence”
It wasn’t the first time Trump has tweeted something vile, but for the first time, Twitter did something about it.
By Laura Hazard Owen
The Toronto Star’s owner once dreamed that it would be a nonprofit. Now it’s being sold to a private equity firm.
The buyers say a lot of the right things. But since they seem to have no publishing experience, there’s no way to know what their plans are for the corporation, or for the newspaper.
By Magda Konieczna
Indiegraf aims to reimagine the newspaper chain for digital news outlets
The Canada-based network aims to take the best of newspaper chains for local digital publications — and leave the rest.
By Sarah Scire
The Information is launching a free “news summer school” on Zoom
“This is about helping young people navigate what has always been a tricky industry to break into and that now faces unprecedented new challenges.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
A window into one newsroom’s diversity opens, but an industry-wide door shuts (for now)
The New York Times’ report comes on the heels of a dispiriting announcement from the American Society of News Editors that the group would be pausing its annual census.
By Sarah Scire
When you leave a company, can you take your podcast with you? Here’s how one team did it
Plus: More thoughts on Joe Rogan and Spotify, the BBC releases its annual plan, and Spotify is reportedly going after podcasts again.
By Nicholas Quah
The Atlantic’s layoffs may sound the death knell for two media revenue hopes: Video and in-person events
“In one week in March, maybe two, the ground fell out from under live events.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Here’s (exactly) how we organized one of the largest virtual U.S. journalism events to date
Once we announced we would host in place instead of in person, registrations shot through the roof; we ended up with just under 750 registrations by the time the conference began. Typically, the summit attracts 150 to 175 people.
By Stefanie Murray and Joe Amditis
Aiming for novelty in coronavirus coverage, journalists end up sensationalizing the trivial and untrue
Sometimes the biggest story does not advance as quickly as journalists might hope. It is in these moments of seeming stasis that journalistic repetition can become more powerful and serve as a way to hold government accountable.
By Michael J. Socolow
Americans who turn to the White House for coronavirus news tend to think the media’s pandemic coverage is overblown
A new Pew Research Center report found Americans’ views of the media’s coronavirus performance differ substantially depending on which sources they rely on most for news about the pandemic.
By Sarah Scire
By securing Joe Rogan’s insanely popular show, Spotify gets closer to complete domination of the podcast space
The terms for the Spotify licensing deal were not disclosed, but I imagine a crap-ton of money was involved in this arrangement.
By Nicholas Quah
U.S. police have attacked journalists more than 120 times since May 28
“Although in some incidents it is possible the journalists were hit or affected accidentally, in the majority of the cases we have recorded the journalists are clearly identifiable as press, and it is clear that they are being deliberately targeted.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Riot or resistance? The way the media frames the unrest in Minneapolis will shape the public’s view of protest
Research finds that protests about anti-black racism and indigenous people’s rights receives the least legitimizing coverage.
Unicorn Riot, a nonprofit media collective, is covering the Minneapolis protests live and close up
Unicorn Riot is just five years old, but this week’s unrest isn’t its first time covering protests against a police killing in the Twin Cities.
What We’re Reading
The New York Times / Taylor Lorenz
People can’t stop watching videos of police and protesters. That’s the idea.
“As of Monday night, the video had amassed more than 45 million views from Mr. Uhl’s tweet alone. After he posted a Dropbox link so that anyone could download and share the video, it garnered tens of millions more views.”
The Washington Post / Margaret Sullivan
Saturday’s protests were big news. Why did these Gannett newspapers push them off the front page?
“The paper’s front page was dominated by a blue rectangle bearing the words ‘Rebuilding America’ — the Gannett newspaper chain’s business-friendly collaboration between its newsrooms and ad departments. The protest coverage, except for a small teaser box at the top of the front page, was relegated to the metro section. Anyone who surveyed the front pages of the chain’s Sunday papers would be greeted by a sea of bright blue graphics with words like ‘We’re in this together’ — but, in many cases, with precious little indication that the nation has been roiled by protests on a scale we haven’t seen in decades.”
9to5Mac / Filipe Espósito
This is what the new Apple News+ audio versions of stories will look like
“While the Audio tab shows up for all users, only Apple News+ subscribers will have access to full stories. If you are not a subscriber, you can only listen to previews of the latest news available.”
San Francisco Chronicle / Owen Thomas
San Francisco Chronicle editor-in-chief Audrey Cooper, the first woman to hold the position, will leave the paper
When Cooper, 42, took the role in 2015, she also became the youngest woman ever to lead a major metropolitan newsroom in the U.S.
Axios / Sara Fischer
Grist takes over Pacific Standard’s assets, will maintain its archives
“Grist will be taking over 20,000+ stories from the Pacific Standard’s archives, as well as all of its audio and video assets. The content still generates a small but notable monthly audience of 1 million readers per month, which still brings in a small amount of ad revenue as well ($2,000–$3,000 monthly). It’s looking at relaunching the brand, and it plans to reinvest that revenue to grow its freelance budget to support reporters doing work on social and environmental justice.”
Axios / Sara Fischer
All 30 McClatchy properties are using the Washington Post’s ad software
“The deal comes roughly a week after The Post inked a partnership with the Local Media Consortium, which represents 3,500 local media outlets from 90 media companies. The Post already works with several local TV stations and newspapers, like the Dallas Morning News and Seattle Times.”
The New York Times / Charlie Warzel
Watching the George Floyd and Black Lives Matter protests, one tweet at a time
“So often these awful instances of violence are framed and treated as one-off events. A tragedy in isolation, an unfortunate escalation. But experiencing these protests in dozens of cities and neighborhoods, night after night and witnessing the endless stream of videos, the pattern is undeniable. The system has long been broken, but it is now impossible to hide from the reality.”
CNN / Kerry Flynn
“I volunteered because somebody has to sleep sometime”: Gutted newsrooms juggle pandemic and protests
“On Sunday, Amber Hunt, investigative reporter at The Cincinnati Enquirer, wrote about the protests in her community in a story titled, ‘Another nightfall brings more tear gas, arrests as Cincinnati protests escalate for the 3rd day.’ But as of 12 a.m. on Monday, Hunt must halt her coverage: she’s on furlough for a full week.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Ishaan Jhaveri and George Civeris
A new app, VizPol, helps journalists identify extremist symbols at demonstrations in real time
Knowledge of the context and associations of symbols like the “Straight Pride” or the Gadsden flag could be very helpful to a reporter as they prepare to interview a demonstrator. The app was developed by researchers at the Tow Center and Columbia’s Journalism and Engineering schools.
Poynter / Rick Edmonds
Civil, the high-profile startup backed by blockchain, is shutting down
Civil was launched in 2017 at the height of enthusiasm for blockchain virtual currency. “It was overcomplicated and hard to explain … Whether it was ahead of its time or just never viable is hard to say.”
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