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The Marshall Project, an early model for single-subject nonprofit news sites, turns five today (and got a shoutout on Jeopardy last night)
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The Marshall Project, an early model for single-subject nonprofit news sites, turns five today (and got a shoutout on Jeopardy last night)
“As a former journalist, I was mindful of the power of honest storytelling. As an idealist, I felt that if only Americans knew the truth, changes would soon follow.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
News portals like Yahoo still bring Democrats and Republicans together for political news, but they’re fading fast
Plus: Hello “lifestyle misinformation,” hundreds of dead newspapers “revived” online to support Indian interests, and all of the fact-checking discussion you could possibly want.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Doing more with less: Seven practical tips for local newsrooms to strrrrretch their resources
Content doesn’t need to be perfect to be valuable; share resources within a city, not just a company; and other ideas.
By Damian Radcliffe and Jaycie Schenone
Wondering how The Salt Lake Tribune got 501(c)(3) status? Here’s their entire application to the IRS — and the IRS’s response
Attention, local newspaper owners: This is now a proven, IRS-approved path to convert your money-losing daily into a community nonprofit. Give it some thought.
By Christine Schmidt
Newsonomics: With its merger approved, the new Gannett readies the cost-cutting knife
What was once expected to be $200 million in annual cost savings has now grown to $400 million or more. But how much blood is left to be drawn from this stone?
By Ken Doctor
Facebook’s intentions may not be pure, but its money is real: How publishers made the most of its membership accelerator
“For some [publishers], this program will be a way to get a check. Some of them are going to pick up some ideas and tips and that’s the end of it. For some of them, it’s truly transformational in how they operate.”
By Christine Schmidt
Newsonomics: CEO Mark Thompson on offering more and more New York Times (and charging more for it)
The “failing” New York Times’ news operation now employs more than 1,700 journalists, up nearly 50 percent from a decade ago. It has nearly 5 million subscribers, triple its print-era peak. Now it’s preparing to up the price.
By Ken Doctor
Nattering nabobs of news criticism: 50 years ago today, Spiro Agnew laid out a blueprint for attacking the press
“In his attacks on television news, Agnew struck a chord with conservatives who had long regarded the media with suspicion. Nixon later called Agnew’s speech a ‘turning point’ in his presidency.”
By Thomas Alan Schwartz
Is Big Entertainment funding great work in podcasting or gentrifying the ecosystem?
Plus: The overlap between podcasts and retail politics, the under-examined world of copcasts, and a message to you, from Rudy.
By Nicholas Quah
In Germany, focusing on this metric let a newspaper increase reader loyalty (and subscribers too)
Not all traffic is created equal, no matter what your web stats dashboard might lead you to believe.
By David Maas
Newsonomics: Nikkei’s Tsuneo Kita: “Without the FT, it wouldn’t have been possible for us to transform ourselves as we have”
“On-the-ground collaboration, on-the-ground communication, on-the-ground exchange are all getting to be more like business as usual.”
By Ken Doctor
The Marshall Project, an early model for single-subject nonprofit news sites, turns five today (and got a shoutout on Jeopardy last night)
“As a former journalist, I was mindful of the power of honest storytelling. As an idealist, I felt that if only Americans knew the truth, changes would soon follow.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
News portals like Yahoo still bring Democrats and Republicans together for political news, but they’re fading fast
Plus: Hello “lifestyle misinformation,” hundreds of dead newspapers “revived” online to support Indian interests, and all of the fact-checking discussion you could possibly want.
Doing more with less: Seven practical tips for local newsrooms to strrrrretch their resources
Content doesn’t need to be perfect to be valuable; share resources within a city, not just a company; and other ideas.
What We’re Reading
TechCrunch / Sarah Perez and Zack Whittaker
Even sweet little Giphy is bad now
“Image search engine Giphy bills itself as providing a ‘fun and safe way’ to search and create animated GIFs. But despite its ban on illicit content, the site is littered with self-harm and child sex abuse imagery, TechCrunch has learned.” (And Nazis too, of course.)
TechCrunch / Manish Singh
TikTok is letting some users add links to their bios
Intended for influencers, but a potential traffic driver for the right publisher too.
Voxnest / Ivey Amburgey
Spotify has passed Apple as the top place people podcast across most of Europe
It was already No. 1 in Latin America, India, and much of Southeast Asia, but Spotify has now passed the native Apple Podcasts app in France, Spain, Germany, Portugal, Italy, and more.
News Media Alliance / Johannes Munter
Newspapers say Google News removing all their stories wouldn’t really be that bad
“The news publishing industry in Spain was not devastated by the adoption of the ancillary copyright law, and countries without Google News still support relatively healthy news industries.” (Note: The stats used here are super generic and don’t really evaluate any direct impact of changes in Google policy.)
Vice / Anna Merlan
Earthquake conspiracy theorists are wreaking havoc during emergencies
“These are not people, of course, who would describe themselves as conspiracy theorists. They would say they are rogue scientists, unfairly reviled by their more mainstream colleagues for having mastered prediction, the ultimate goal of seismology. They say they’re only working to share that information with the public, and frequently accuse established scientific agencies like the USGS of hiding earthquakes or changing the magnitude after the fact to downplay their severity.”
CNBC / Alex Sherman
Apple News+ has struggled to add subscribers since first week of launch in March, sources say
“Apple signed on 200,000 subscribers to Apple News+ in its first 48 hours in March, but has been stuck in neutral since that time, according to people familiar with the matter.”
ScienceDaily
A study finds that Facebook’s “efforts to improve transparency have actually led to the removal of ads promoting vaccination and communicating scientific findings”
“Because Facebook categorizes ads about vaccines as ‘political,” it has led the platform to reject some pro-vaccine messages. ‘By accepting the framing of vaccine opponents — that vaccination is a political topic, rather than one on which there is widespread public agreement and scientific consensus — Facebook perpetuates the false idea that there is even a debate to be had.'”
Mediaite / Matthew Kassel
Here’s what magazines lose when they go digital-only
“While a post-print existence may be less costly, it is, at least initially, more constrained, with much of the attention that was formerly enjoyed simply stripped away.”
Google
Google News adds an algorithm-driven “Behind the News” feature
“The stories are surfaced and organized using our Google News algorithms. Users can find the feature on the right side of news.google.com, and it is now available on desktop globally in U.S. English. More languages and a mobile version are planned for 2020.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.