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Can U.S. journalism truly serve global audiences? Not if it treats them like an afterthought
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Can U.S. journalism truly serve global audiences? Not if it treats them like an afterthought
What would a truly global media company look like?
By Anita Zielina
“The idea and techniques of investigative reporting can be done by anyone anywhere”: How Francisco Vara-Orta wants to change IRE’s mission
“We all grew up with All the President’s Men. You don’t want to take away from the power of that moment and the press holding the administration accountable. But we have to think, why was there not a Black person or a woman on that team?”
By Janelle Salanga
KPCC and LAist are shifting the focus of their politics coverage from politicians to voters. Here’s why.
“Our goal is to reenergize demoralized readers and listeners who’ve given up on civic involvement amid all the vein-popping vitriol.”
By Tony Marcano
How old laws are being used to shut down independent journalism in Hong Kong
Hong Kong’s sedition laws were introduced in the early 20th century and had been unused since the 1970s. Now they are being used to charge Apple Daily and Stand News journalists.
By Yan-Ho Lai and Yuen Chan
How big a threat is The Athletic to local newspapers under The New York Times?
Should the combination keep local publishers up at night? Or are they different markets altogether?
By Joshua Benton
The New York Times debuts a fellowship for crossword constructors
NYT Games editorial director Everdeen Mason on building a more diverse set of puzzle constructors and an “ecosystem” for solvers. “I don’t want people to just come in and play a game and leave.”
By Sarah Scire
New research shows how news coverage influences countries’ emergency aid budgets
“The bureaucrats we interviewed said that, in some circumstances, sudden and intense news coverage did increase levels of humanitarian aid — regardless of whether or not the crisis merited it.”
By Martin Scott, Kate Wright and Mel Bunce
Need help navigating change in your newsroom? Khan Academy has some ideas.
A case study of how Khan Academy changed how they worked — and what newsrooms can learn from how they tested new ideas, tackled challenges, and found success.
By Eric Athas and Kim Perry
“Traffic whoring” or simply optimizing? Finding the boundaries between clean and dirty metrics
“Journalists go to some lengths to construct symbolic boundaries that allow them to incorporate metrics into their work while preserving their professional self-conception.”
By Caitlin Petre
Just a little too slow: Why journalists struggle to cover climate change
The biggest news story of all time doesn’t quite fit our working definition of news, and hence is going remarkably undercovered.
By Bill McKibben
Can U.S. journalism truly serve global audiences? Not if it treats them like an afterthought
What would a truly global media company look like?
By Anita Zielina
“The idea and techniques of investigative reporting can be done by anyone anywhere”: How Francisco Vara-Orta wants to change IRE’s mission
“We all grew up with All the President’s Men. You don’t want to take away from the power of that moment and the press holding the administration accountable. But we have to think, why was there not a Black person or a woman on that team?”
KPCC and LAist are shifting the focus of their politics coverage from politicians to voters. Here’s why.
“Our goal is to reenergize demoralized readers and listeners who’ve given up on civic involvement amid all the vein-popping vitriol.”
What We’re Reading
The Washington Post / Emily Davies and Elahe Izadi
These mass shooting survivors were called journalism heroes. Then the buyouts came.
“’It felt like death all over again in a lot of ways when people would leave to take buyouts,’ said Selene San Felice, a former Capital Gazette reporter who had hidden under a desk during the attack. ‘We could feel each other being ripped apart when all we wanted to do was stay.’”
Washington Post / Margaret Sullivan
This NPR host used a “truth sandwich” to counter the former president’s election lies
Steve Inskeep, a host of “Morning Edition,” used the technique in an interview with former president Trump. The idea is to “surround false statements with established truths before and after, blunting the effect of what can amount to propaganda.”
The New York Times / Maggie Haberman
RNC signals a pullout from presidential debates
“If the RNC moves forward with it, it is unclear what that would mean for future debates. But it would change the approach to be similar to what happened before the commission existed, when the two parties or campaigns had to negotiate directly and agree on terms, or no debates would take place.”
PressGazette / William Turvill
One million digital-only subscribers by year end and a family legacy: LA Times owner Patrick Soon-Shiong on his ambitious plans
“Look, I think if we can grow to a million in the next year, and then double that every year, that will make us very sustainable until we get to 4-5m. The New York Times has done it.”
Washington Post / Cristiano Lima
No one reads the terms of service. Lawmakers want to fix that with a new “TLDR” bill.
“Users should not have to comb through pages of legal jargon in a website’s terms of services to know how their data will be used. Requiring companies to provide an easy-to-understand summary of their terms should be mandatory and is long overdue.”
CNN / Nimi Princewill and Stephanie Busari
Nigeria to lift Twitter ban after six-month suspension
“The decision was made after Twitter agreed to meet all conditions set by the Nigerian government, according to a government statement. Those conditions include “managing prohibited publication in line with Nigerian law” and addressing issues of operations and tax.”
HuffPost / Brandon Soderberg and Andy Friedman
Major media outlets can’t stop describing police violence as “officer-involved” incidents
“Following the murder of George Floyd, The Associated Press issued guidance that reporters should not describe instances where police shot someone with neutral language. It didn’t work.”
E&E News / Thomas Frank
Inside The New York Times’ crossword correction on coal
“On Jan. 3, Times editors replied and said Lempel had raised “a thoughtful point about clean coal” but that Will Shortz ‘still finds the clue better as it is without any hedging.’”
The Washington Post / Paul Farhi
A Rochelle Walensky interview sparked outrage. But the CDC says ABC omitted crucial context.
“After CDC officials obtained a full version of the interview and complained to ABC this week, the network took down the misleading clips and post the fuller version with a note: ‘This video clip has been updated to include an extended version. … A shorter version edited for time was broadcast on Friday, January 7.’”
Current / jesikah maria ross and Olivia Henry
How CapRadio connected with rural audiences during the pandemic
“Our planning group told us how important it was for stories to appear where Plumas and Sierra residents would organically find them, and for the most part that was not CapRadio.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.