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Newsonomics: It’s looking like Gannett will be acquired by GateHouse — creating a newspaper megachain like the U.S. has never seen
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Newsonomics: It’s looking like Gannett will be acquired by GateHouse — creating a newspaper megachain like the U.S. has never seen
A combined GannHouse (Gatenet?) would own 1 out of every 6 daily newspapers in America. The goal? Buy two or three more years to figure out how to make money in digital.
By Ken Doctor
Local news projects rush to fill The Vindicator’s void, with the McClatchy-Google network putting down roots
“We’re ultimately trying to do this as small and nimble as possible so that we can be seeing what’s working and throw out what’s not — and quickly being able to shift in a way that’s a little bit harder when you’re working with a 150-year-old newspaper.”
By Christine Schmidt
Hey comment mods, you doin’ okay? A new study shows moderating uncivil comments reduces the moderator’s trust in news
“The toll of moderating uncivil comments may be much stronger for moderators putting in several hours or a full day.”
By Christine Schmidt
Attempting a meta-network for local news, Facebook announces community-building grantees
Recipients include 100 Days in Appalachia, Block Club Chicago, Chalkbeat, and the Tyler Loop, among others.
By Christine Schmidt
Apple might be getting into the podcast-making business. Is its reign as the industry’s benevolent overlord coming to an end?
“There remains a lot we don’t know, and I have strong feeling we’re witnessing a little shard of a much larger, complicated soul-searching process.”
By Nicholas Quah
West Coast offense: Los Angeles gets a new hub for podcasting to match WNYC Studios out east
Plus: Tim Ferriss brings back ads, two American companies go British, and the mystery of the one-star iTunes review.
By Nicholas Quah
What sort of news travels fastest online? Bad news, you won’t be shocked to hear
When one news publisher has a story about something bad — a disaster, a death, or just general terribleness — other publishers move more quickly to match it than they do with good news.
By Joshua Benton
How Free Press convinced New Jersey to allocate $2 million for rehabilitating local news
“I really believe in the power of people to organize and advocate from the bottom up to create some solutions to this. I don’t think these solutions are going to come out of commercial media.”
By Christine Schmidt
Nuclear disasters, information vacuums: How a lack of data in Fukushima led to the spread of fake health news
Plus: All the media literacy resources, and giving parents information about the flu vaccine.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Governments making “fake news” a crime risk stifling real journalism — accidentally or intentionally
Lumping together disinformation campaigns with news the government says isn’t in the “public interest” is a recipe for abuse.
By Alana Schetzer
Newsonomics: It’s looking like Gannett will be acquired by GateHouse — creating a newspaper megachain like the U.S. has never seen
A combined GannHouse (Gatenet?) would own 1 out of every 6 daily newspapers in America. The goal? Buy two or three more years to figure out how to make money in digital.
By Ken Doctor
Local news projects rush to fill The Vindicator’s void, with the McClatchy-Google network putting down roots
“We’re ultimately trying to do this as small and nimble as possible so that we can be seeing what’s working and throw out what’s not — and quickly being able to shift in a way that’s a little bit harder when you’re working with a 150-year-old newspaper.”
Hey comment mods, you doin’ okay? A new study shows moderating uncivil comments reduces the moderator’s trust in news
“The toll of moderating uncivil comments may be much stronger for moderators putting in several hours or a full day.”
What We’re Reading
The Times / Matthew Moore
The BBC could become a subscription service, its director-general says
“The compulsory licence fee system is guaranteed until 2027, after which the broadcaster will have to negotiate a new funding arrangement with the government…’You could decide the BBC is a subscription service,’ Lord Hall of Birkenhead told MPs. ‘It would be very, very different to the sort of BBC you have now, because you would be giving subscribers what they want, not the breadth of the population.’ He added: ‘I would argue that’s the wrong model for supporting the BBC.'”
Medium / Global Editors Network
An interview with RSF on its new standards-for-trustworthy-news initiative
“…we are not ranking, rating or judging an individual article. The reason is that we fear such a mechanism, even if well-intentioned, could be easily misused and turned into a tool for censorship. Therefore, the [Journalism Trust Initiative] standard only looks at the environment in which journalism is being produced, the benchmarks of quality and safeguards of independence at the process level.”
Medium / Matt Hinchliffe
The new tech principles for FT.com
“Slow down to speed up. Write code you can fix at 3 a.m. Get to the root of the problem. Make small changes often. Keep things secure. Favor existing solutions. Use data effectively. Treat unblocking others as your priority. Assume good faith.”
Variety / Todd Spangler
Netflix insists it won’t move into selling advertising
“We, like HBO, are advertising free. That remains a deep part of our brand proposition; when you read speculation that we are moving into selling advertising, be confident that this is false. We believe we will have a more valuable business in the long term by staying out of competing for ad revenue and instead entirely focusing on competing for viewer satisfaction.”
The Hill / David Morgan
Whose stories get told? Why media diversity matters
“For example, a number of news organizations are still not attuned to the need to have journalists of color cover the 2020 campaign. Imagine being responsible for shaping coverage for the presidential campaign and not understanding how fundamental to the debate issues of racism, identity and justice are going to be — and not understanding that journalists who live these issues are uniquely prepared to cover them well.”
The New York Times
The New York Times and Meredith are teaming up to make those commemorative magazines you pass by the checkout at Walgreens
“The inaugural ‘Summer of ’69’ issue will coincide with The New York Times coverage of the 50-year anniversary of that summer. As part of the collaboration, there are plans for five subsequent issues devoted to other historical events, significant milestones and cultural subjects.”
Variety / Todd Spangler
Proof that consumers are always evaluating their digital subscriptions: Netflix lost customers in the U.S. last quarter
“For the first time in eight years, Netflix lost subscribers in the U.S. — dropping a net 130,000 for the second quarter of 2019…The company said the Q2 subscriber results were the result of a weaker content slate in the quarter, which drove fewer paid net adds than anticipated.” (You’re always re-earning your digital subscribers.)
Editor & Publisher / Matt DeRienzo
Newspapers should reorient their print content to serve their aging audiences
“Maybe the formula for print subscriber retention includes increasing newshole to provide more national wire content and late previous-day box scores (that we all pay for anyway) and increasing the size of type to be friendly to aging eyeballs. What other kinds of content will inform and delight an older print audience? History and nostalgia, longer features, puzzles. They have leisure time to spend on these things that a younger audience does not.”
CJR / Brian Merchant
Don’t quote me on this, but “on background” is a scourge in tech reporting
“Every single conversation I have had with a big-five tech company representative this year has been on background. It has become the default method by which Silicon Valley disseminates information to reporters. This is a toxic arrangement. The tactic shields tech companies from accountability.”
The New York Times / Jennifer Miller
Have we hit Peak Podcast?
“Anyone can start one and so anyone who thinks they can start one will do it. It’s like the business of me.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.