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Indian journalists are on the frontline in the fight against election deepfakes
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Indian journalists are on the frontline in the fight against election deepfakes
The ongoing general election is a pressure test for how to report on political voice clones and video spoofs.
By Andrew Deck
Welcome to the neighborhood! How Documented brings NYC immigration news to Nextdoor’s Caribbean communities
“We are bringing onto this platform — where people usually talk about their lost cat or that they’re looking for an apartment — serious news content sparking a new kind of conversation.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
ProPublica’s new “50 states” commitment builds on a decade-plus of local news partnerships
With annual revenue of $45 million and a staff approaching 200 people, ProPublica has been one of the big journalism winners of the past decade. And it’s been unusually willing to spread that wealth around the country.
By Joshua Benton
“Journalism moves fast…philanthropy moves slow.” Press Forward’s director wants to bring them together
“I see, every week, some example of where the two don’t understand each other. Each of them needs to shift a little bit.”
By Sophie Culpepper
After criticism over “viewpoint diversity,” NPR adds new layers of editorial oversight
“We will all have to adjust to a new workflow. If it is a bottleneck, it will be a failure.”
By Sarah Scire
“Impossible to approach the reporting the way I normally would”: How Rachel Aviv wrote that New Yorker story on Lucy Letby
“So much of the media coverage — and the trial itself — started at the point at which we’ve determined that [Lucy] Letby is an evil murderer; all her texts, notes, and movements are then viewed through that lens.”
By Sarah Scire
Increasingly stress-inducing subject lines helped The Intercept surpass its fundraising goal
“We feel like we really owe it to our readers to be honest about the stakes and to let them know that we truly cannot do this work without them.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
In an increasingly fractured Europe, this project is betting on one-on-one talks as a way to find common ground
“We get requests from all over the world, and everyone says that their country is experiencing unprecedented levels of polarization or a breakdown in social cohesion.”
By Eduardo Suárez
After The Messenger’s collapse, Jimmy Finkelstein seems to be itching for a do-over
“May I suggest to any potential investors just setting your money on fire instead? Faster, less traumatic, same outcome.”
By Joshua Benton
Apple News adds a new original game to boost News+ subscriptions
The news aggregator app has focused on puzzles and games that are “more welcoming to newcomers.”
By Sarah Scire
People who got off Facebook for 6 pivotal weeks in 2020 may have been less likely to vote for Trump
“We do think our results can inform readers’ priors about the potential effects of social media in the final weeks of high-profile national elections.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
How NPR and Floodlight teamed up to uncover fossil fuel “news mirages” across the country
“It’s information. But it’s not news.”
By Neel Dhanesha
This journalism professor made a NYC chatbot in minutes. It actually worked.
“The step that we need to make as a society is moving from, ‘This came from a machine, it must be correct,’ to, if I’m talking to a friend of mine who says something crazy, ‘I need to double check that, I need to cross reference it to make sure that it is accurate.'”
By Colin Lecher, The Markup
For the first time, two Pulitzer winners disclosed using AI in their reporting
Awarded investigative stories are increasingly relying on machine learning, whether covering Chicago police negligence or Israeli weapons in Gaza
By Andrew Deck
“We’re there to cover what’s happening”: How student journalists are covering campus protests
“We don’t come in when there’s something crazy happening and then leave when it’s over. This is just what we do all the time. And I really hope that makes people trust us more as a newspaper.”
By Sophie Culpepper
Indian journalists are on the frontline in the fight against election deepfakes
The ongoing general election is a pressure test for how to report on political voice clones and video spoofs.
By Andrew Deck
Welcome to the neighborhood! How Documented brings NYC immigration news to Nextdoor’s Caribbean communities
“We are bringing onto this platform — where people usually talk about their lost cat or that they’re looking for an apartment — serious news content sparking a new kind of conversation.”
ProPublica’s new “50 states” commitment builds on a decade-plus of local news partnerships
With annual revenue of $45 million and a staff approaching 200 people, ProPublica has been one of the big journalism winners of the past decade. And it’s been unusually willing to spread that wealth around the country.
What We’re Reading
Washington Post / Heather Kelly
Meta walked away from news. Now the company’s using it for AI content
“Meta’s new chatbot, Meta AI, is happy to scan news outlets and summarize their latest stories and headlines for anyone who asks. It’s even doing it in Canada, where the company banned links to news sources on Facebook and Instagram in August to get around a law that could require it to pay publishers.”
Digiday / Sara Guaglione
How sending fewer emails and content previews improved The New Yorker’s newsletter engagement
“While its news and politics-related email volume has decreased by 65% since this change, [Jessanne Collins, The New Yorker’s director of newsletters] said that the publishers’ page views coming from the News & Politics newsletter have gone up by 35%.”
CNN / Jon Passantino, Hadas Gold, and Oliver Darcy
Israel reverses on seizure of Associated Press camera feed after intense backlash
“In a sharp reversal, Israel said Tuesday it would return camera and broadcast equipment it had seized from the Associated Press in the southern Israeli city of Sderot on Tuesday after the action prompted swift backlash from U.S. officials and press groups.”
The Boston Globe / Aidan Ryan
“Really disturbing”: GBH lays off 31 employees
“Public media organization GBH laid off 31 employees on Wednesday and suspended production of three television programs, CEO Susan Goldberg told employees. The job losses affected 13 departments and represented 4 percent of the workforce, Goldberg said.”
NPR / Joanna Kakissis, Polina Lytvynova, and Claire Harbage
A newspaper near Ukraine’s border with Russia watches for freed POWs
“Before the war, [Peremoha editor Oleksandr Motsny] says, he and two reporters covered hyperlocal issues such as small businesses, farmers and milestone birthdays. Everything changed on Feb. 24, 2022, when Russia launched its full-scale invasion of Ukraine. Peremoha was set to celebrate its 90th anniversary the next day.”
Axios / Sara Fischer
60 Minutes is America’s top-rated TV news program for the 50th consecutive year
“This past season, the program was television’s top nonsports prime-time program 15 times. It has been TV’s top overall prime-time program 14 times over the last three TV seasons.”
The Verge / Chris Welch
After releasing the universally panned AI Pin, Humane is looking for a buyer
“That’s according to a report from Bloomberg, which says the company — led by former longtime Apple employees Imran Chaudhri and Bethany Bongiorno — is ‘seeking a price of between $750 million and $1 billion.'”
The Verge / Emma Roth
Microsoft Edge will translate and dub news videos as you’re watching them
“Microsoft announced that the new Al-powered feature will be able to translate spoken content through both dubbing and subtitles live as you’re watching it…Edge will also support real-time translation for videos on news sites such as Reuters, CNBC, and Bloomberg.”
The Atlantic / Charlie Warzel
OpenAI’s manifest destiny: This is happening, whether you like it or not
“At the core of these deflections is an implication: The hypothetical superintelligence they are building is too big, too world-changing, too important for prosaic concerns such as copyright and attribution.”
The Hollywood Reporter / Alex Weprin
BuzzFeed has a new activist investor…Vivek Ramaswamy?
“According to an SEC filing, Ramaswamy owns shares and call options worth just under $4 million, and equivalent to about 7.7% of BuzzFeed shares…An activist stake does not always lead to a hostile takeover attempt (as we saw with Elon Musk and Twitter), but it does usually result in the activist pushing for changes to the company, and occasionally cutting a deal, for board seats or other options.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.