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How we unionized the digital team at The Seattle Times (and how you can do it at your company too)
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How we unionized the digital team at The Seattle Times (and how you can do it at your company too)
A mini-diary of the organizing experience, including a timeline, resources you can rely on, and decision points you might face.
By Michelle Baruchman
It’s not their job to buy you cake
Working remotely for the last year has revealed just how much of office culture is accidental, arbitrary, and sexist.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Overstory Media Group wants to provide cover (and salaries) for local journalists
Two years after a cofounder launched Victoria-based Capital Daily as a daily newsletter, Overstory will try to replicate the success. The new media group has plans to grow to 50 publications and 250 journalists by 2023.
By Sarah Scire
Swati Sharma is leading a new era in Vox’s mission to “explain the world”
“When I think about the kinds of stories I want us to do more of, it’s the kind of coverage that pushes people to have the conversations that lead to real change.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
Eying a future subscription service, Twitter acquires the ad-free news startup Scroll
But we have bad news. The acquisition means that the handy news aggregator Nuzzel will be shut down.
By Sarah Scire
Passports, pauses, and Pfizer: Here’s where Covid-19 misinformation went in April
In April, various right-wing media outlets created an online frenzy that attacked and firmly politicized “vaccine passports” — positioning the idea as a new political flashpoint in the pandemic culture war.
By First Draft Staff
Someone new thinks they can make Yahoo and AOL good businesses in 2021
And, as usual for this glum moment in media, it’s a private equity firm that wants a crack at finding new places to cut.
By Joshua Benton
As Covid-19 spreads, India’s press freedom is shrinking
Here’s what Modi can do if he really wants to change India’s image of being a “dangerous place for journalists.”
By Lison Joseph
Not just “elected officials and policy experts”: Top editors are trying to refocus the opinion pages on regular people
Editors at The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post (and one opinionated Substacker) discussed the rapid growth of opinion in online journalism.
By Sarah Scire
We’re hiring! Come work for Nieman Lab as the deputy editor
Here are a few things to know before you apply. (Then, apply!)
By Laura Hazard Owen
Do Americans really not support “core journalism values”? It all depends on your definitions (and the questions you ask)
Debating methodology may be boring, but a poorly structured study can warp how journalists think about their audiences.
By Joshua Benton
Covid-19 accelerated the media’s reporting on early, drafty scientific research (for better and for worse)
More than 25% of Covid-19 preprints have featured in at least one news article, researchers found, and almost 100% of Covid-19 preprints were tweeted about at least twice.
By Jonathon Alexis Coates
How we unionized the digital team at The Seattle Times (and how you can do it at your company too)
A mini-diary of the organizing experience, including a timeline, resources you can rely on, and decision points you might face.
By Michelle Baruchman
It’s not their job to buy you cake
Working remotely for the last year has revealed just how much of office culture is accidental, arbitrary, and sexist.
Overstory Media Group wants to provide cover (and salaries) for local journalists
Two years after a cofounder launched Victoria-based Capital Daily as a daily newsletter, Overstory will try to replicate the success. The new media group has plans to grow to 50 publications and 250 journalists by 2023.
What We’re Reading
The New York Times / Katie Robertson
Teen Vogue hires NowThis’ Versha Sharma as its new top editor
“She was named to the job nearly two months after Alexi McCammond, a former Axios journalist, resigned after more than 20 Teen Vogue staff members publicly condemned tweets she had posted a decade earlier.”
Vanity Fair / Joe Pompeo
“You may never see those numbers again”: Can cable news pass the post-Trump test?
“In the days and weeks after President Biden’s inauguration, without endless provocations from the man who occupied such a vast swath of our attention for the better part of five years, news consumption started to feel more and more, what’s the word — healthy? Liberated? Sane?”
Poynter / Rick Edmonds
How much is Tribune Publishing worth? Is Alden getting a steal of a deal at $630 million?
“A company — like a house — is worth what someone will pay for it. Alden’s $630 million bid was filed Dec. 31. In the four months-plus that have passed no one has yet come forward with a firm higher or comparable bid…Hedge funds like Alden operate as buyers of last resort for companies and assets no one else wants.”
BleepingComputer / Sergiu Gatlan
WhatsApp will make itself useless unless you allow Facebook to share its data with its other apps
It won’t delete your account. But “you’ll encounter limited functionality…You won’t be able to access your chat list, but you can still answer incoming phone and video calls.” Then, “after a few weeks of limited functionality, you won’t be able to receive incoming calls or notifications and WhatsApp will stop sending messages and calls to your phone.”
Twitter / Kansas City News Guild
The Kansas City Star’s newsroom is the latest to unionize
“We claim our seat at the table with management for a significant goal: to maintain and grow the biggest, most authoritative news organization in the region. Journalists must have a stronger voice to make that happen, especially at this critical time of flux in our news business.”
ProPublica
ProPublica is launching a summer internship program with the Ida B. Wells Society
“Interns will gain experience and mentorship from the award-winning investigative newsroom while covering topics related to abuses of power and betrayals of public trust.”
The Atlantic / Helen Lewis
On Substack, it’s all about that beef
“Normal people — with regular lives and real jobs — have soap operas and reality shows. People who are Extremely Online have Substack…for a certain subset of the American elite—a group of people who are concentrated in journalism, academia, and related fields…following the lives of these people is what they do instead of watching General Hospital or The Bachelor.”
The Wall Street Journal / Benjamin Mullin
Vice Media is targeting a nearly $3 billion valuation in a SPAC deal
“The nearly $3 billion valuation under consideration would be a discount compared with the $5.7 billion valuation set in Vice Media’s last major equity-investment round, a $450 million infusion from TPG in 2017…There is no guarantee that institutional investors will want to fund the proposed Vice Media transaction.”
Study Hall / Olivia Messer
The COVID reporters are not okay. Extremely not okay.
“One former pandemic reporter told me she quit writing about the coronavirus because doing it for a year ‘ruined me.’ A former political reporter at a major cable news network who covered the congressional response to COVID told me she left her job after ‘eight months of being exhausted and hating my job and wanting to quit journalism entirely…I think the standard, at least for [my network], was to work very hard and be miserable and not complain about it.'”
Poynter / Barbara Allen
How the role of personal expression and experience is changing journalism
“She recalled an incident involving an Asian man who looked ‘exceptionally like’ her father. ‘I saw him be humiliated and beaten and called slurs for collecting cans in a neighborhood,’ Lim said. ‘And I just watched it on a loop thinking to myself, “My God, this could so easily be my own father.” When you see something that looks like you, it’s almost impossible not to relate.'”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.