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Just how broken is our political information ecosystem, anyway?
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Just how broken is our political information ecosystem, anyway?
Nearly half of Trump supporters surveyed still believe he’ll be sworn in for a second term in January. Not that he should be — that he will be.
By Joshua Benton
“Whoa!” “I’m crying!” “Worrisome!” “Buckle up!” The swift, complicated rise of Eric Feigl-Ding and his Covid tweet threads
The scientist has gained popularity as Covid’s excitable play-by-play announcer. But some experts want to pull his plug.
By Jane C. Hu
Parler is bringing together mainstream conservatives, anti-Semites, and white supremacists as the social media platform attracts millions of Trump supporters
While it’s too early to tell if Parler is here to stay, it has already achieved a reputation and level of engagement that has overtaken other alternative platforms.
By Alex Newhouse
The moral argument for diversity in newsrooms is also a business argument — and you need both
The business case for diversity and inclusion in newsrooms is important, but emphasizing the moral case is required for real and lasting change.
By Nicole A. Childers
The NewsRun, a daily newsletter about Pakistan, cuts through the noise of a cluttered media market
Anam Khan first started the NewsRun to help other Pakistanis living abroad keep up with the news, but quickly found that people back home needed her to make sense of what’s happening in the country, too.
By Hanaa' Tameez
Another bit of good news from Apple: Publishers can now offer targeted discounts in the App Store
Want to offer a special introductory rate for students and educators? Superfans of your local football team? People who’ve hit your paywall five months running? You now can through the App Store on iPad and iPhones.
By Joshua Benton
Daily news podcasts are “punching well above their weight” with audiences
Deep dives! Extended chats! News bulletins! Microbulletins!
By Sarah Scire
In Brazil, 10 news outlets are teaming up to try to make journalism cool for young people
Ten digital news startups are collaborating to bring the news to the urban youth in Brazil, and learning about their consumption patterns along the way.
By Hanaa' Tameez
Why should Trump supporters get media coverage that other groups of voters don’t?
Plus: The Committee to Protect Journalists has its first union contract, Wisconsin Public Radio tracks source diversity, and who is Substack for?
By The Objective Staff
How much political news do people see on Facebook? I went inside 173 people’s feeds to find out
October 2020 was one of the craziest news months in recent history, but you wouldn’t know it by looking in people’s Facebook feeds.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Apple is reducing the cut it takes from most news publishers’ subscriptions
Instead of taking 30% of new subscribers’ payments, it’ll take 15%. The money’s welcome, but it’s also a reminder of how little control publishers have over the terms they get from tech giants.
By Joshua Benton
Election polls are more accurate if they ask participants how others will vote
Most people know quite a bit about their friends and family, including how happy and healthy they are and roughly how much money they make. It turns out this knowledge of others extends to politics, too.
By Wändi Bruine and Mirta Galesic
So what did the 2020 election really mean, anyway? Here’s a first draft of media history, from 100-plus scholars
Including how research into sports fandom explains Trump supporters’ claims of voter fraud: “One’s degree of team identification is a major predictor for attributing a loss to external forces such as referees and opponents’ cheating, resulting in denial of the outcome.”
By Joshua Benton
Just how broken is our political information ecosystem, anyway?
Nearly half of Trump supporters surveyed still believe he’ll be sworn in for a second term in January. Not that he should be — that he will be.
By Joshua Benton
“Whoa!” “I’m crying!” “Worrisome!” “Buckle up!” The swift, complicated rise of Eric Feigl-Ding and his Covid tweet threads
The scientist has gained popularity as Covid’s excitable play-by-play announcer. But some experts want to pull his plug.
Parler is bringing together mainstream conservatives, anti-Semites, and white supremacists as the social media platform attracts millions of Trump supporters
While it’s too early to tell if Parler is here to stay, it has already achieved a reputation and level of engagement that has overtaken other alternative platforms.
What We’re Reading
Ars Technica / Jon Brodkin
Ajit Pai announces his departure from FCC after a four-year deregulatory blitz
“In his four years as FCC chief, Pai deregulated the broadband industry, eliminated net neutrality rules, and justified his deregulatory agenda by using faulty data and taking credit for broadband deployments that were planned before he became chairman.” We’ll always have the giant coffee mug.
Ars Technica / Catherine Sinow
How YouTube’s algorithm made 1980s ambient Japanese music a smash hit
“The popularity of YouTubecore albums first released decades ago has caused their long-out-of-print physical counterparts to skyrocket in price. Predictably, record labels have come to the rescue with reissues on vinyl, CD, and even cassette.” (Previously: How Spotify’s algorithm turned an obscure B-side into Pavement’s biggest hit, and how Spotify’s algorithm made a 28-year-old album track Galaxie 500’s biggest hit.)
The Guardian / Jim Waterson
How an anti-lockdown “truthpaper” bypasses online factcheckers: print
“The outlet, which has published three issues since it first appeared in September, draws heavily on the gloop of long-running online conspiracies about a new world order, which have attached themselves to the current pandemic…[its founder says] his publication has a print run of 100,000 copies, which are distributed by volunteers who sign up to the outlet’s core message that the coronavirus is a hoax.”
Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism / Izin Akhabau
Newsrooms need young journalists. Here’s how to create a place where they can flourish
“I can distinctly remember my first office party as a very young journalist, and being challenged to twerk by an older white and very respected journalist. It had taken a lot of convincing for me to even arrive at that Christmas party and that element of the experience made me very uncomfortable. How do we deal with these characters that exist in media environments?”
The Washington Post / Elahe Izadi
Which Trump official has coronavirus now? Bloomberg’s Jennifer Jacobs always seems to know first
“It’s an only-in-2020 beat, covering the health emergencies of White House officials, many of whom have bucked their own administration’s public safety recommendations, such as mask-wearing, as the virus has spread within one of the world’s most secure office spaces.”
Twitter / Joshua Benton
R.I.P. Deb Price, a trailblazer for LGBTQ journalists
In 1992, at The Detroit News, she launched the first nationally syndicated column about gay issues to run in mainstream newspapers — five years before Ellen DeGeneres came out.
The New York Times / Leigh-Ann Jackson
A work week in the life of The Verge editor-in-chief Nilay Patel
“I have gotten substantially worse at email during the pandemic. Not having a commute means I don’t have a built-in time to work through my inbox. I stare at 1,303 unreads. They stare back at me.”
The Atlantic / Franklin Foer
The book publishing industry is consolidating for one big reason: Amazon
“If it’s correct to worry about a merged company that publishes perhaps 33 percent of new books, then surely it’s correct to worry more about the fact that Amazon now sells 49 percent of them…Yes, publishers are oligopolistic and hardly sympathetic, but their continued health is essential to the survival of the book business, and thus the intellectual life of this country.”
The New York Times
The New York Times will be free for high school students and teachers until September
A low-risk opportunity to hook future subscribers when they’re young. (In Minneapolis, the Star Tribune launched a similar program for Minnesota students earlier this month.)
Nieman Reports / Madeleine Schwartz
How journalists in Belarus, Jordan, Thailand, and Nicaragua battle accusations of “fake news”
“The arrests and violence have pushed journalists to work in new ways. Journalists no longer wear clothing identifying them as press for fear of being targeted. The violence also has prompted a change in news distribution: Media outlets have migrated onto the messaging platform Telegram.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.