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“Politics as a chronic stressor”: News about politics bums you out and can make you feel ill — but it also makes you take action
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“Politics as a chronic stressor”: News about politics bums you out and can make you feel ill — but it also makes you take action
“Daily political events consistently evoked negative emotions [which] predicted worse day-to-day psychological and physical health, but also greater motivation to take action aimed at changing the political system that evoked the negative emotions in the first place.”
By Joshua Benton
Digital-only newsrooms are in the firing line as Australian news law grinds toward reality
Lifestyle and youth publishers that source the majority of their traffic from Facebook face closure, while traditional media players that campaigned for the laws look set to be the relative winners.
By Hal Crawford
Spanish-language misinformation is flourishing — and often hidden. Is help on the way?
“Conspiracies are flourishing with virtually no response from credible Spanish-language media outlets.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
For COVID-19, as with everything else, Americans on the right and left live in different universes when it comes to trusting the media
A new study looks at how people in seven countries view the motives of the news media in covering the pandemic. Only in the United States is that a profoundly partisan question.
By Joshua Benton
A new nonprofit newsroom, Mountain State Spotlight, wants to be the watchdog for West Virginia
“In my experience in legacy media, the answer was to throw your hands in the air and say, ‘There’s not much we can do.’ Well, I don’t find that acceptable. We have to find ways to reach those audiences.”
By Sarah Scire
Are news companies already putting diversity pledges on the back burner?
Plus: Writers reveal problems at Chicago Magazine, and The Atlantic damages trust with transgender readers.
By The Objective Staff
NPR adds localized news for 10 cities to its afternoon podcast Consider This
Listeners in 10 regions will hear local news after national stories thanks to geo-targeting technology being used in a new way.
By Sarah Scire
Anti-Racism Daily is a newsletter that helps you read the news and do something about it
“People tend to get very outraged when there’s a death, when something terrible happens in the news, and then the conversation caves. But in the wellness community — in the world that I work in — people are really familiar with the idea of practice.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
Who’s interested in “slow journalism”? Turns out, mostly the same people who are into regular ol’ fast journalism
Slow news has been pitched as a way to break through the noise and reach audiences exhausted by the daily headlines. But it’s still fast-news junkies who are most attracted to it, this new research finds.
By Joshua Benton
Escape, education, aspiration: What do rich and poor people want from lifestyle journalism?
Rich and poor people have different expectations of lifestyle journalism. But some of what they want is the same.
By Laura Hazard Owen
“Politics as a chronic stressor”: News about politics bums you out and can make you feel ill — but it also makes you take action
“Daily political events consistently evoked negative emotions [which] predicted worse day-to-day psychological and physical health, but also greater motivation to take action aimed at changing the political system that evoked the negative emotions in the first place.”
By Joshua Benton
Digital-only newsrooms are in the firing line as Australian news law grinds toward reality
Lifestyle and youth publishers that source the majority of their traffic from Facebook face closure, while traditional media players that campaigned for the laws look set to be the relative winners.
Spanish-language misinformation is flourishing — and often hidden. Is help on the way?
“Conspiracies are flourishing with virtually no response from credible Spanish-language media outlets.”
What We’re Reading
Wired / Anne Helen Petersen
How work became an inescapable hellhole
“All that digitally enabled flexibility really means digitally enabling more work—with fewer boundaries.”
The Markup / Surya Mattu
The Markup introduces Blacklight, a privacy tool that reveals user-tracking tech on any site
“Who is peeking over your shoulder while you work, watch videos, learn, explore, and shop on the internet? Enter the address of any website, and Blacklight will scan it and reveal the specific user-tracking technologies on the site—and who’s getting your data.”
The Verge / Ashley Carman
The days of reposting images on Instagram might be over
Facebook will let people (“certain partners”) claim ownership of images and issue takedown requests … “This could theoretically mean that if a brand like National Geographic uploaded its photos to Facebook’s Rights Manager, it could then monitor where they show up, like on other brands’ Instagram pages. From there, the company could choose to let the images stay up, issue a takedown, which removes the infringing post entirely, or use a territorial block, meaning the post stays live but isn’t viewable in territories where the company’s copyright applies.”
Los Angeles Times / Meg James and Daniel Hernandez
The Los Angeles Times assigned two reporters to investigate controversies in its own newsroom. Here’s the result.
“If we’re going to want to shine a light on others, we have to be willing to shine a light on ourselves.”
Nieman Reports / Ron Nixon
Newsrooms need a plan to diversify investigative teams, too
“The overall number of journalists of color in investigative reporting in management or on investigative teams remains abysmally low. The reasons for this are many. In numerous cases, journalists of color aren’t looked at as potential candidates for investigative reporters and aren’t given the opportunity to pursue stories that would give them the chance to show that they can do investigative work.”
Knight Foundation / Helen Stubbs
Americans agree the news media is under attack; they diverge on whether it’s justified
Those who say political attacks on the media “are justified”: 16% of Democrats, 36% of independents, and 61% of Republicans.
Digiday / Kayleigh Barber
‘Ripped the Band-Aid on some hard decisions’: How The New York Times is reshaping its ad business for a cookie-less world
“[The pandemic] has accelerated us moving into the ad business that we want to be in. There is something that happens when you can’t do a lot about your quarterly results and it requires that you focus on a year or two from now.”
NPR / David Folkenflik
The Trumpist boss of Voice Of America is in the hot seat
“On Monday morning, Sen. Robert Menendez of New Jersey sent a letter demanding answers from Pack, a Trump appointee, about his top personnel choices. Since taking office in June, Pack has been on a tear.”
Journalism.co.uk / Jacob Granger
Audio articles helped Zetland gain 2,000 new members during lockdown
“Four in five features by the Danish slow journalism outlet are consumed as reporter-narrated audio stories that ‘have that campfire feel to them’ rather than as written content, fuelling success of its membership programme.”
Nikkei Asian Review / Kim Jaewon
South Korea’s news outlets chase the digital dream
“With the vast majority of the population getting their news for free from aggregator sites. South Korea’s biggest newspapers have long struggled to monetize online content… No mainstream South Korean media outlet has managed to secure a stable income from its online news service — which is why several are studying business models of their global peers, including The Nikkei, The Financial Times and The New York Times.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.