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Three years into nonprofit ownership, The Philadelphia Inquirer is still trying to chart its future
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Three years into nonprofit ownership, The Philadelphia Inquirer is still trying to chart its future
Buyouts, rebranding, good journalism, and a vision still in progress: The Philadelphia Inquirer has had quite a summer. The metro newspaper business is still tough, even without a hedge fund or private equity pulling the strings.
By Christine Schmidt
People avoid consuming news that bums them out. Here are five elements that help them see a solution
“It is important that journalists take the time to fully explain the issue and the response before exploring implementation, results, and insights.”
By Christine Schmidt
The Boston Globe continues its regional expansion experiment, with students in a suburb
“Investigative reporting is great to have, but first we need the basics — and we’re no longer getting them.”
By Christine Schmidt
How trans journalists are challenging — and changing — journalism
“As we become more visible, trans journalists are asking journalism leaders to confront the structural barriers that make it hard for trans people to enter and remain in the industry.”
By Lewis Raven Wallace
Open or closed: Who will control the paid-podcast experience, podcasters or tech companies?
PodPass gets some positive early reviews. Also: a new network for kids’ audio, the CBC translates podcasts to TV, and are daily news shows having any real-world impact?
By Caroline Crampton
So Youngstown will have a daily named The Vindicator after all. But it’s a brand surviving, not a newspaper.
Long after the local newspaper business stops making any sense at all, there’ll be a lot of powerful brand names that will retain value better than what the printing presses pumped out. That’s how we’ll get local news outlets without much local news.
By Joshua Benton
Maybe you know that article is satire, but a lot of people can’t tell the difference
Labeling satire as such may seem to take the sting out of the joke. But it’s also the most effective way we know of to prevent people from taking satirical content as fact — something surprisingly common.
By R. Kelly Garrett, Robert Bond, and Shannon Poulsen
This reporter came for ER bills (with the help of 1,000-plus patients), and now doctors are listening
Sarah Kliff has brought her healthcare billing projects from Vox to The New York Times, reporting on the submissions of thousands of readers. And now she’s written for an audience of practitioners and academics.
By Christine Schmidt
Don’t click this: When should news organizations use “nofollow” links?
Plus, a new free course for online fact-checking taught via workspace app Notion.
By Laura Hazard Owen
One potential route to flagging fake news at scale: Linguistic analysis
It’s not perfect, but legitimate and faked news articles use language differently in ways that can be detected algorithmically: “On average, fake news articles use more expressions that are common in hate speech, as well as words related to sex, death, and anxiety.”
By Fatemeh Torabi Asr
Finally, Instagram is getting fact-checked (in a limited way and just in the U.S., for now)
“The potential to prevent harm is high here, particularly with the widespread existence of health misinformation on the platform.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
America’s largest union of journalists is doing a rewrite of its leadership election
Three decades of age separate the incumbent and his challenger, who present different views of the NewsGuild’s effectiveness organizing new newsrooms.
By Joshua Benton
Three years into nonprofit ownership, The Philadelphia Inquirer is still trying to chart its future
Buyouts, rebranding, good journalism, and a vision still in progress: The Philadelphia Inquirer has had quite a summer. The metro newspaper business is still tough, even without a hedge fund or private equity pulling the strings.
By Christine Schmidt
People avoid consuming news that bums them out. Here are five elements that help them see a solution
“It is important that journalists take the time to fully explain the issue and the response before exploring implementation, results, and insights.”
The Boston Globe continues its regional expansion experiment, with students in a suburb
“Investigative reporting is great to have, but first we need the basics — and we’re no longer getting them.”
What We’re Reading
ABC News / Rhiannon Hobbins and Flip Prior
Here’s how the Australian Broadcasting Corporation is fixing the absence of women in its reporting
“Teams record the gender of interviewees. They measure what they can control. In News, for instance, we would not count someone, such as the Prime Minister, who is critical to a particular story but we would count an expert commentator, as we can choose whether we hear from a male or female expert. The data then forms part of the regular editorial meetings.”
Scientific American / Claire Wardle
“Misinformation has created a new world disorder”
“Bad actors who want to deepen existing tensions [design] content that they hope will so anger or excite targeted users that the audience will become the messenger. The goal is that users will use their own social capital to reinforce and give credibility to that original message. Most of this content is designed not to persuade people in any particular direction but to cause confusion, to overwhelm, and to undermine trust in democratic institutions from the electoral system to journalism.”
The Atlantic / Ken White
Don’t use these free speech arguments ever again
“…when you smugly drop ‘You can’t shout “Fire!” in a crowded theater’ in a First Amendment debate, you’re misquoting an empty rhetorical device uttered by a career totalitarian in a long-overturned case about jailing draft protesters. This is not persuasive or helpful.”
The Information / Alex Heath
Facebook pushes Instagram to earn its keep
“Some executives in the room saw Instagram’s success as a threat to Facebook itself…In the roughly 11 months since Mosseri took over, most of Instagram’s senior leadership team has been replaced, Facebook has ordered Instagram to roughly double the number of advertisements in the app…employees from Instagram and WhatsApp were also told recently that their corporate email accounts will be switched to addresses that end with fb.com.”
Digiday / Jessica Davies
Google says news publishers lose 62% of ad revenue when users block cookies
(Of course, you may have heard Google makes a little money from digital advertising too.)
CJR / Jeremy Gordon
Can music journalism transcend its access problem?
“Across the industry, celebrity journalism has waned, thanks to the emergence of the internet as a promotional tool — it is possible to share your story directly, without the mediation of a mildly depressed writer — and the ongoing fragmentation and resource-depletion of publications across America.”
Current / Tyler Falk
Alaska public broadcasters lose state funding
“The governor’s office said in a press briefing about the vetoes that it recognizes public broadcasting’s ‘important role in Alaska, especially in our rural communities that have limited or no access to other forms of media.’ But funding for public broadcasting ‘can no longer be sustained,’ the briefing said.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Simon Parkin
Reporting the abstract issues of climate change — through games
“There’s lots of data out there. We thought there was a clear story that could walk people through climate cuts and help them discover what’s needed to really meet emissions targets. When you play…you realize pretty quickly we need to make much more drastic cuts than one might assume.'”
MIT Technology Review / Andy Wright
Why are products for older people so ugly?
“They are the Longevity Explorers, part of Caro’s experiment to improve the way technology is developed for older adults. They’ve been meeting here since 2014. Throughout most of the meeting Caro sits quietly at the head of the table, hands clasped together, and just listens. He wishes more people—especially entrepreneurs—would do the same.”
Reynolds Journalism Institute / Jennifer Nelson
The Associated Press plans to study push alerts (and how to make them less annoying)
“During the fellowship, the team plans to experiment with various alerting features on the AP’s news site and mobile app to test different delivery methods, topics and timing. They will measure various metrics, which may include open, follow and uninstall rates as they study user preferences. As they seek to learn users’ preferences, they will also conduct user research.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.