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On a rough day for American newspapers, investors aren’t buying Gannett’s story and Tribune’s not done chopping
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On a rough day for American newspapers, investors aren’t buying Gannett’s story and Tribune’s not done chopping
“I just don’t believe where the stock is trading” is not a thing you want to hear from one of your biggest investors. And in Chicago, some of the most prestigious positions in journalism are now either eliminated or part-time gigs.
By Joshua Benton
No one cares that you were editor of your college newspaper: Reporter bios don’t improve readers’ trust in your news outlet
Crave the smell of barbecue? Love your kids? Won a Pulitzer? None of it seems to move the needle on how your readers perceive your work.
By Hanaa' Tameez
Maybe publisher cooperation is a path forward for news, but it shouldn’t be at the expense of public media
In Norway and Sweden, a survey finds some people won’t pay for online news because the news from their free public broadcaster is good enough. That’s a feature, not a bug.
By Joshua Benton
“Big tech is watching you. Who’s watching big tech?” The Markup is finally ready for liftoff
After a false start, the unconventional team of algorithm investigators is ready to dive deep. “I’ve heard that we are tying our hands behind our backs, but there must be a way to engage an audience without subjecting readers to a surveillance ecosystem.”
By Sarah Scire
Can Rupert Murdoch and Boris Johnson team up to kneecap the BBC?
Plus: A new and more inclusive top-podcasts ranking, new funding for a premium-feed provider, and why album-specific podcasts are the hot new promotional tool for music.
By Nicholas Quah
Report for America will support 19 journalists to cover Native American communities
“You build trust through listening and through recognizing other people’s knowledge…In order to build trust, you have to believe what people tell you.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
Who needs deepfakes? Simple out-of-context photos can be a powerfully low-tech form of misinformation
A bogus headline seems both more true and more familiar to people when it’s accompanied by a photo of any kind.
By Lisa Fazio
Newsonomics: In Memphis’ unexpected news war, The Daily Memphian’s model demands attention
It’s generated controversy over its fundraising, its paywall, and its staffing. But it’s also about as close as a major American city has gotten to a digital news site that can go toe-to-toe with the local daily newspaper.
By Ken Doctor
The New Yorker’s new weekly newsletter on climate change will try to break through the daily noise
“Climate is one of those big, overarching topics that feels essential to understand and also very overwhelming. The newsletter form seems like the right way to approach it because it narrows the focus.”
By Sarah Scire
Spotify is gaining a podcast audience quickly. But is it an audience that isn’t as interested in news?
Data from Germany finds that Apple Podcasts users devote about 23 percent of their podcast listening to news shows — versus just 8 percent for Spotify users.
By Joshua Benton
Feeling panicked about coronavirus? Media coverage of new epidemics often stokes unnecessary fear
For journalists, it’s worth remaining alert to the dangers of spreading fear — a highly contagious emotion — in the face of uncertainty.
By Karin Wahl-Jorgensen
On a rough day for American newspapers, investors aren’t buying Gannett’s story and Tribune’s not done chopping
“I just don’t believe where the stock is trading” is not a thing you want to hear from one of your biggest investors. And in Chicago, some of the most prestigious positions in journalism are now either eliminated or part-time gigs.
By Joshua Benton
No one cares that you were editor of your college newspaper: Reporter bios don’t improve readers’ trust in your news outlet
Crave the smell of barbecue? Love your kids? Won a Pulitzer? None of it seems to move the needle on how your readers perceive your work.
Maybe publisher cooperation is a path forward for news, but it shouldn’t be at the expense of public media
In Norway and Sweden, a survey finds some people won’t pay for online news because the news from their free public broadcaster is good enough. That’s a feature, not a bug.
What We’re Reading
Google / LaToya Drake
Google will give $6 million to projects that focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion in journalism
Last year, the Google Innovation Challenge distributed $5.8 million to 34 projects in 17 states. This round, Google is shifting the spotlight to projects that will build sustainable models for local media addressing diverse and underrepresented audiences.
MEL Magazine / Joseph Longo
What happened to queer media?
“In 2020, queer media is hard to define. It’s been forced to adapt to smaller corporate budgets and changing corporate interests — or tough it out independently. There are fewer dedicated journalism platforms and job opportunities for young reporters. Instead, there’s content marketing aimed at LGBTQ audiences: Grindr’s Bloop and Netflix’s new queer vertical The Most.”
Medium / The NYT Open Team
The New York Times has released the anti-doxxing resources they use to train their own reporters
“To help our Times colleagues think like doxxers, we developed a formal program that consists of a series of repeatable steps that can be taken to clean up an online footprint.”
Los Angeles Times / Suhauna Hussain
‘Please disregard, vote for Bernie’: Inside Bloomberg’s paid social media army
“Applicants’ recent social media posts were reviewed by campaign staff for racist or offensive content, or conflicting material, such as support for a different presidential candidate, organizers said. (The Bernie Sanders supporter was asked to remove posts, retweets and likes in support of the Sanders campaign.) Once approved, organizers completed training for various apps including Outvote, Hustle and ThruTalk and were encouraged to post on social media every day in support of Bloomberg.”
NPR / Sam Gringlas
With an election on the horizon, older adults are getting help spotting fake news
“If we were standing in line in the supermarket, and we saw a tabloid, people in my generation know what that means, but if we see something online, the traditional cues we’re used to are not present.”
Arizona Republic / Greg Burton and Phil Boas
Joining a growing list, The Arizona Republic will no longer make candidate endorsements
The Republic acknowledged their 2016 endorsement of Hillary Clinton — “the first in our then 126-year history to recommend a Democrat for president” — angered a lot of readers.
Chicago Tribune
Tribune continues to cut deep in its leadership ranks, this time at the top of Chicago Tribune newsroom
Editor-in-chief/publisher Bruce Dold is out after 42 years at the Tribune. He’s being replaced by Colin McMahon, the chain’s chief content officer — a job he’ll keep, in effect eliminating a position. One of the paper’s two managing editors, 32-year Tribune veteran Peter Kendall, is also out and won’t be replaced. Tribune CEO Tim Knight was pushed out earlier this month.
Tampa Bay Times
Tampa Bay Times staffers are being forced to take a 10 percent pay cut
Starting next week, all full-time staff will have their pay reduced by 10 percent and the reduction will last until June 5, 2020. Affected staffers will be given an extra five days of paid time off. “’Any observer will quickly see how challenging and volatile our industry has become,’ the note said. ‘We remain committed to the critical changes that will put the Tampa Bay Times back on a path of growth, and we are seeing some pockets of success, both in the industry and at the Times.'”
Medium / Mariana Dale
5 ways one journalist is incorporating engagement into everyday reporting
An early childhood education reporter at KPCC-LAist uses the “daily practice” of engagement to work her recently-redesigned beat. (A “super spreadsheet” is involved.)
Washington Post / Rachel Weiner and Matt Zapotosky
FBI arrests five alleged members of a neo-Nazi group for targeting journalists with threatening fliers and fake 911 calls
“The group called the New York Police Department to ProPublica’s office in December 2018, according to the criminal complaint, claiming that there was a pipe bomb, a hostage and a dead body inside … Two months later, prosecutors say the group called police to [a ProPublica reporter’s] home in California, claiming that he was armed and had just killed his wife.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.