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Some midterm polls were on target, but finding which pollsters to believe can be tough
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Some midterm polls were on target, but finding which pollsters to believe can be tough
The outcomes confirmed anew that election polling is an uneven and high-risk pursuit.
By W. Joseph Campbell
Can Mastodon be a reasonable Twitter substitute for journalists?
Adam Davidson: “I think we got lazy as a field, and we let Mark Zuckerberg, Jack Dorsey, and, god help us, Elon Musk and their staff decide all these major journalistic questions.”
By Julia Angwin, The Markup
11 (and counting) things journalism loses if Elon Musk destroys Twitter
Goodbye to screenshotted best bits, DMs, “that tweet should be a story”…
By Laura Hazard Owen
This German news outlet is teaching people about local politics with an in-person game
“It gives you a much better view on what politics on a local level is, instead of just reading about it or going to a meeting yourself and sitting in as a guest.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
What’s the best way to deal with a flood of misinformation? Maybe it’s time for some deliberate ignorance
“It is only by ignoring the torrent of low-quality information that people can focus on applying critical search skills to the remaining now-manageable pool of potentially relevant information.”
By Joshua Benton
Meta’s layoffs make it official: Facebook is ready to part ways with the news
“Meta had the resources at its peak to do incredible things. Not just the dollars, but the encouragement to think of the best outcome possible, to make the biggest impact we could.”
By Sarah Scire
“We actually go back to the beginning”: After launching in London, the TikTok-focused News Movement comes to the U.S.
“One of our first successful TikTok videos that surpassed over a million views is our explainer of where Ukraine is on a map.”
By Marina Adami
There’s a 68 in 100 chance you’ll read this article about the audience for FiveThirtyEight-style election predictions
In other words, the odds are pretty good — but it’s far from a lock.
By Nicholas Diakopoulos
How a nonprofit media company conducted its first political poll ahead of the midterms
Futuro Media isn’t the type of news outlet that normally conducts political polling, which is why it wanted to dip its toes in.
By Hanaa' Tameez
Election coverage that shows generic “long line” images may discourage voting, new research finds
We found that Americans who see news coverage that shows generic “line” images at polling places are less likely to say they will vote in future elections.
By Kathleen Searles and Christopher Mann
The term “White Christian nationalism” is on the rise. Here’s what journalists should know about using it
“A keyword-focused ‘close enough, good enough’ approach to white Christian nationalism risks misdiagnosing problems, muddling solutions, and alienating potentially reachable readers.”
By Whitney Phillips, Mark Brockway and Abby Ohlheiser
What types of local news stories should be automated? The Toronto Star is figuring it out
In the case of break-and-enter stories, “everybody recognized that a poor execution of the idea would be a problem.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
Are journalism intermediaries getting too much foundation money?
More money should go to news organizations directly — even if that means making hard choices.
By Richard Tofel
Some midterm polls were on target, but finding which pollsters to believe can be tough
The outcomes confirmed anew that election polling is an uneven and high-risk pursuit.
By W. Joseph Campbell
Can Mastodon be a reasonable Twitter substitute for journalists?
Adam Davidson: “I think we got lazy as a field, and we let Mark Zuckerberg, Jack Dorsey, and, god help us, Elon Musk and their staff decide all these major journalistic questions.”
11 (and counting) things journalism loses if Elon Musk destroys Twitter
Goodbye to screenshotted best bits, DMs, “that tweet should be a story”…
What We’re Reading
The Guardian / Adam Gabbatt
Crime coverage on Fox News halved once the U.S. midterms were over
“It crescendoed right before election day, and then once the election was over, so was America’s crime crisis no longer the subject of maximum concern that it had been in the previous weeks.”
Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism / Federica Cherubini
61% of media leaders embrace hybrid work; 20% want to return to pre-pandemic norms
“Regardless of what rules organisations have put in place in terms of home versus office work, opinions are divided on whether staff are effectively coming back to the office. At the end of summer 2022, there were reports of other industries also battling with their employees to get them back into the workplace.”
The New Yorker / Jelani Cobb
Why Jelani Cobb quit Elon Musk’s Twitter
“On November 20th, the Mastodon handle @LauraMartinez posted, ‘I’m here because Elon broke Twitter,’ which was more of a summary of what a great many people felt about the old platform than a zealous endorsement of the buggy, complicated new one.”
The Guardian / Edward Helmore
Layoffs, low ratings and a lurch closer to the right: Is CNN in crisis?
“‘One of the biggest misconceptions about my vision is that I want to be vanilla, that I want to be centrist. That is bullshit,’ [CEO Chris Licht] said. ‘You have to be compelling. You have to have edge. In many cases you take a side.'”
Financial Times / Hannah Murphy, Alex Barker, and Arjun Neil Alim
Twitter’s ad business is in trouble
“After several waves of job cuts and departures, Twitter’s ads business team has shrunk so much that many agencies no longer have any point of contact at the company and have received little to no communication in recent weeks, according to four industry insiders.”
The Guardian / Rupert Neate
UK minister rejects measure designed to tackle legal harassment of journalists
“A cross-party coalition of MPs has been calling for the change in the law to ‘prevent the use of court processes to silence investigative journalists’ with the threat of multimillion-pound legal costs, following a rash of Slapps seeking to ‘silence investigative journalists.'”
The Washington Post / Erik Wemple
News outlets stand by their midterm debacle
“Which is to say: Major media outlets promoted an inaccurate depiction of the national political mood heading into Election Day, and they have no stated regrets about it. And if they’re holding discussions on improving the coverage, they don’t care to disclose them.”
The Washington Post / Taylor Lorenz
“Opening the gates of hell”: Elon Musk says he will revive banned accounts on Twitter
“This is the second time in a week that Musk has used a Twitter poll to seemingly make a major decision related to the platform.”
Ars Technica / Ron Amadeo
Amazon Alexa is a “colossal failure,” on pace to lose $10 billion this year
“The report says that while Alexa’s Echo line is among the ‘best-selling items on Amazon, most of the devices sold at cost.’ One internal document described the business model by saying, ‘We want to make money when people use our devices, not when they buy our devices.'”
The Present Age / Parker Molloy
“Sorry you didn’t get invited to a wedding, I guess?”
“This is the story of some DC reporters who got upset that they didn’t get invited to a wedding. Nothing more. And naturally, when faced with pushback (such as asking why Cook didn’t bother to read the photo caption), these journalists got even more defensive, arguing that people just don’t understand how journalism works.”
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