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Block Club Chicago offered two versions of the same breaking news story — with and without a horrifying video
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Block Club Chicago offered two versions of the same breaking news story — with and without a horrifying video
Readers told the nonprofit local newsroom that they appreciated the option to read an article omitting graphic video and images of 13-year-old Adam Toledo’s death.
By Sarah Scire
Substack will spend $1 million to support “up to 30” local news writers
“This is not a grants program, nor is it inspired by philanthropic intent.”
By Sarah Scire
Would you pay $34.99 a month to get news from Reuters.com? That’s their hope
Who deems Reuters.com so essential that they’ll pay more than two Netflixes a month for it?
By Laura Hazard Owen
Philanthropic support is a small but growing revenue stream for The Guardian, reaching a record-breaking $9M last year
What does it mean for other news organizations hoping to attract institutional support?
By Sarah Scire
With matrimonial ads and shoutouts, Lokal is finding new revenue in staples of Indian media
Lokal, a location-based community information app in India, experimented with monetizing shoutouts and hyperlocal classified ads. It earned them $60,000 in March.
By Hanaa' Tameez
“Maybe the kind of reform that we want comes from creators being like, ‘I’m done'”
Charlie Warzel on newsletters, platforms, reporting, editing, and luck.
By Brad Esposito
Gawker stalker: The news-and-gossip site that helped define the modern content web is coming back to life
With a former staffer in charge, the new Gawker might have a chance at sticking in a media marketplace that’s changed since its closure in 2016.
By Joshua Benton
Mel Magazine reinvented men’s media, and now it’s hoping for a second act
“It’s paramount that we don’t come back as like, a new sneakerhead website or something. I just can’t do that.”
By Luke Winkie
The Front Page, 4/9: Newsrooms still haven’t figured out what to do when their journalists are harassed online
Plus: The need for more public editors, Latinx representation in newsrooms, and “a letter to PBS from viewers like us.”
By The Objective Staff
“The idea that we can change anything, I have given up on”: NBC News’ Brandy Zadrozny on documenting the “depressing” internet
“Suddenly, the stupid stuff on the internet, the scary stuff on the internet, became just so mainstream and important. And that totally should not be.”
By Brad Esposito
Scientists need to get better at talking to the public. Why doesn’t training seem to help?
We wanted to know more about what really helps scientists talk to the public. What we found surprised us.
By Robert Wyss, Margaret Rubega, and Robert Capers
This J-school is old. Its first-ever diversity and inclusion chair is new.
“What I want is for them is to be absolutely confident. That’s what I want. Confidence in their skills and to feel confident that they will be valued both for their lived experience, and for their expertise as professionals.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
Why does so much news about the European Union still come out of London, even post-Brexit?
Even without the U.K., English is still the most widely spoken language in the EU, and that’s led to some awkward arrangements.
By Joshua Benton
Jeff Israely: Getting paid means some work for brands — and it’s O.K. to talk about that
It is only the latest, though perhaps most complicated, chapter of the marriage of convenience between advertising and news.
By Jeff Israely
Block Club Chicago offered two versions of the same breaking news story — with and without a horrifying video
Readers told the nonprofit local newsroom that they appreciated the option to read an article omitting graphic video and images of 13-year-old Adam Toledo’s death.
By Sarah Scire
Substack will spend $1 million to support “up to 30” local news writers
“This is not a grants program, nor is it inspired by philanthropic intent.”
Would you pay $34.99 a month to get news from Reuters.com? That’s their hope
Who deems Reuters.com so essential that they’ll pay more than two Netflixes a month for it?
What We’re Reading
CNN / Arnaud Siad and Eoin McSweeney
BBC received more than 100,000 complaints over its coverage of Prince Philip’s death
“Figures made available by the BBC showed 109,741 complaints had been made, as of Thursday, ‘driven by reaction to the amount of coverage given to the death of the Duke of Edinburgh.'”
The Objective / Gabe Schneider
What does movement journalism mean for journalism as a whole?
“Movement journalism represents a fissure in American journalism. It is a framework opposed to mainstream journalism practices — which still often prioritize the comfort of white male cisgender voices — in the guise of ‘objectivity.’ And many of the journalists that practice it seem unconcerned with larger legacy newsrooms that are preoccupied with stature and tradition, instead of emphasizing the importance of doing right by the communities they report with.”
New Naratif / Aye Min Thant
“Every journalist’s worst nightmare”: CNN’s Myanmar misadventure
“To add insult to injury, Ward’s participation in this nightmare of a trip produced little to no information not previously reported by local journalists. CNN endangered 11 people and their families just to pursue celebrity-driven, parachute journalism that serves no purpose other than chasing higher ratings. Ward’s in-studio colleague gave it away when the first question he asked her on air was: ‘Tell us why it’s so important for you to be there.’”
Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism
Nikki Usher on how journalists can produce work that reaches out to people outside of elite classes
“There are these ways in which exposure to local news and information in particular is drastically diminished when there’s a high bar of entry, and it’s not just about pay, it’s also about bandwidth. So there are lots of people in the United States who have really terrible internet connections, maybe because they live in rural America, maybe because their kids are using it for Zoom, and so when you’ve got the clunky loading of these horrible sort of advertising sites, people with older devices, phones or – they just can’t even handle that.”
Galaxy Brain / Charlie Warzel
A ship got stuck. So he built a website.
What happens when 70 million people visit your joke site?
WAN-IFRA / Elizabeth Shilpa
How Die Presse built its data capabilities and transitioned to a data-friendly news organization
“Behind this success is a strategy that aligns business and journalism, and unites all staff under the single goal of monetising quality journalism. This strategy evolved into a process that has helped drive them forward.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Jon Allsop
A season of turnover in the news industry
“There are many reasons for the recent turnover, from the general hellish intensity of the news cycle, to specifically personal factors, to the ongoing industry reckoning with racism and other institutional faults. The upheaval at CBS alone demonstrates this range: Zirinsky had reportedly grown tired of the bureaucratic and managerial demands of her position atop CBS News (according to Page Six, during a recent budget meeting, Zirinsky wrote “I hate my job” on a piece of paper and held it above her head).”
The Boston Globe / Linda Rodriguez McRobbie
Is parenting during the workday here to stay?
“And while the pandemic has made the children of working parents more visible than ever, it’s also made it apparent that in most hetero, two-parent homes, it’s mothers who bear a disproportionate responsibility for child care, elder care, domestic chores, and household management, even when they’re working. As Indiana University sociologist Jessica Calarco says, America’s safety net is women.”
DigBoston / Chris Faraone
A short documentary about how DigBoston weathered a pandemic year
“I wanted to compile some sort of time capsule about the struggle we have endured to continue reporting the news. Our difficulties aren’t comparable to the family and personal hardships that too many people are still living through, but we’re among the last outlets that cover those for whom basic comforts amount to luxury amenities in good times, and considering that we’ve been going extra hard on that grind all year, it seemed like a video compendium was fitting.”
Substack / Richard J. Tofel
SPACs are not a business model
“As so often is the case with faddish financial techniques, the only people who make sure returns are the financial professionals … Is there really any evidence that the sort of minimal ‘scale’ that comes from combining these relatively small companies will make them better able to compete for advertising with Facebook, Google and Amazon? Definitely not.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.