Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Votebeat will cover local election administration as a permanent newsroom
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Votebeat will cover local election administration as a permanent newsroom
“How do you produce journalism that strengthens elections? That’s the question that runs through my mind every day.”
By Sarah Scire
Hype is a weaponized form of optimism
Want to know the true value of AI, NFTs, and other much-touted technologies? Ignore the news and look at the harsh judgment of the market.
By Lee Vinsel and Jeffrey Funk
For print newspapers, one Florida retirement community is a better market than Atlanta, St. Louis, or Portland
For local newspapers, print circulation has collapsed for every audience except retirees. That’s why the daily paper in The Villages, Florida (metro population 129,752) prints as many copies as the one in Atlanta (metro population 6,930,423).
By Joshua Benton
The Tributary, covering Florida’s largest city, will be a worker-directed nonprofit
Staffers will take part in making collective decisions about the organization, from hiring and compensation to developing the budget, along with their journalistic work.
By Hanaa' Tameez
The Los Angeles Times gets a fully staffed “burner account”
The first-of-its-kind team is offering “views, vibes, and commentary.”
By Sarah Scire
The Washington Post wants to give you a good deal on a digital subscription — from now until 2072
Anyone who tells you they know what digital news will look like in 50 years is lying. But the Post — with an owner rich enough to allow a decades-long time horizon — says it’ll still only cost you $50 a year.
By Joshua Benton
Meet the fact-checkers decoding Sri Lanka’s meltdown
Using public documents and crowdsourced data, supported by shoe-leather reporting, Watchdog hopes to arm citizens with information that can effect real change.
By Nilesh Christopher
Facebook looks ready to divorce the news industry, and I doubt couples counseling will help
Out of every 1,000 times someone sees a post on Facebook, how many of them include a link to a news site? Four. No wonder Facebook doesn’t want to write publishers big checks anymore.
By Joshua Benton
“Facebook has taken over”: How residents find local info when local newspapers aren’t doing the job
“A lot of it’s trash, to be honest, but a lot of it’s very useful.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
When student loans and the housing crisis force journalists out of the business
“Is our compensation structure fundamentally unjust because we pay primarily for experience and skills, with no consideration for need?”
By Wendi C. Thomas
Loans got me into journalism. Student debt pushed me out.
“My journalism degree was more expensive than my wealthier classmates’ degrees because I couldn’t afford to pay in cash. But that’s a common theme with American systems. Poor people pay high prices. Rich people get discounts.”
By Carrington J. Tatum
Votebeat will cover local election administration as a permanent newsroom
“How do you produce journalism that strengthens elections? That’s the question that runs through my mind every day.”
By Sarah Scire
Hype is a weaponized form of optimism
Want to know the true value of AI, NFTs, and other much-touted technologies? Ignore the news and look at the harsh judgment of the market.
For print newspapers, one Florida retirement community is a better market than Atlanta, St. Louis, or Portland
For local newspapers, print circulation has collapsed for every audience except retirees. That’s why the daily paper in The Villages, Florida (metro population 129,752) prints as many copies as the one in Atlanta (metro population 6,930,423).
What We’re Reading
Literary Hub / Patrick Radden Keefe
Patrick Radden Keefe on “the art of the writearound” and why access journalism is overrated
“The obligation to work around a reluctant subject also forces you to do more reporting than you otherwise might. Most access-driven profiles involve an interview or two with the central figure, and then some secondary interviews, which are often facilitated by the subject of the story (‘Here’s a list of people who will tell you wonderful things about me. I’ve told them to expect your call.’)”
The Verge / Russell Brandom
Twitter has launched a lawsuit against the Indian government over the country’s aggressive speech laws
“The lawsuit comes after Twitter was ordered to remove a series of accounts and posts that violate Indian obscenity and defamation laws … Twitter has now removed the posts, but is seeking judicial protection from such orders in the future.”
Newsweek / Alex J. Rouhandeh
IBT Media is suing Newsweek’s CEO and demanding he return the magazine
“This case is about the rightful and legal ownership of Newsweek” … but also about a “made-up” purchase price of $5,000, a money-laundering probe, and the followers of a Korean American cleric.
Associated Press
AP has reopened its Gaza bureau, one year after the agency’s previous building was destroyed by an Israeli airstrike
“Twelve AP staffers and freelancers were inside on May 15, 2021, when the Israeli military telephoned a warning, giving occupants of the building one hour to evacuate. AP journalists rushed to a neighboring tower to capture live video of the building crumbling.”
New York Times / Katie Robertson
Stewart Bainum says he’s giving The Baltimore Banner “four or five years” to prove its value
“If at four or five years this is just a black hole, then you know there are other places to invest philanthropically.”
New York Times / Stuart A. Thompson
“They’re going to have to cheat again”: False election claims are widespread on conservative talk radio
“Republican politicians and cable outlets like Fox News have carried the torch for Mr. Trump’s conspiracy theories ever since. But the loudest and most consistent booster of these unfounded claims has been talk radio, where conservative hosts reduce the jumble of false voter fraud theories into a two-word mantra: ‘Democrats cheat.'”
Bloomberg / Matthew Bremner
Sports reporter by day, famous Uzbek political blogger by night
“Over the course of more than a decade, the Haqnazarov reports helped trigger international investigations and the seizure of almost $1 billion in what US law enforcement officials say were ill-gotten gains.”
New York Times / Terence McGinley
David Fahrenthold on why the world of nonprofits is prime for investigative reporting
“You’re always grateful as a reporter when somebody with subpoena power is looking at the same question you are”
Defector / Tom Ley
“Someone always ends up holding the bag”: On the Substack layoffs
“There is perhaps another timeline in which Substack never allowed investors like Marc Andreessen to get their hooks into it, and in that world its employees are currently enjoying the fruits of working at a modestly successful and sustainable business with no need to attempt scaling beyond its means.”
Washington Post / Erik Wemple
After Dobbs, a look at Supreme Court commentary that hasn’t aged well
“Though we’ll never be rid of erroneous predictions from pundits, we hereby put forth a pitch for obliterating puff-piece testimonials from high-flying lawyers.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.