Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
The Journalism Creators Program at CUNY teaches participants to launch their own news products, from wherever they are
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
The Journalism Creators Program at CUNY teaches participants to launch their own news products, from wherever they are
One lesson from pandemic times is that journalism education doesn’t have to happen in person, and remote learning can open up more opportunities for journalists to launch their own products.
By Hanaa' Tameez
Google releases new tools for journalists — and shares insider insight on what’s trending on the search platform
Pinpoint, which uses AI and machine learning to help reporters sift through investigative materials, is part of the recently-released Journalist Studio.
By Sarah Scire
Older people and Republicans are most likely to share Covid-19 stories from fake news sites on Twitter
The far-right site The Gateway Pundit was by far was the most-shared fake news domain; in some months, its stories were shared almost as often as stories from The New York Times, The Washington Post, and CNN.
By Laura Hazard Owen
As they shrink, are local newspapers protecting their “iron core” of local government coverage? This paper says no
Newspapers have all had to make cuts. But it doesn’t look like they’ve favored the beats that are most important to democracy — watchdog coverage of local governments — over other kinds of news.
By Joshua Benton
Keep your pants on, everyone (and quit defending the male journalists who don’t)
Plus: The SacBee wants those sweet, sweet clicks, the Dallas News Guild wins its vote to unionize, and “when bison merit 80% of the airtime afforded to Asian American history, it calls into question not only the leadership of public television but also who gets to tell these stories, and why.”
By The Objective Staff
How the Minneapolis Star Tribune made the best of a canceled state fair
Carve-your-own butter sculptures, Minnesota trivia, and cheese curd-flavored chapstick were among the Star Tribune’s virtual offerings. (Replicating the llama costume contest proved a bit too difficult.)
By Sarah Scire
Russian, Chinese, and Iranian media are turning on Trump, an analysis of foreign news outlets suggests
Two key moments from the 2020 campaign — the first debate and Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis — are particularly illustrative.
By Robert Hinck, Robert Utterback and Skye Cooley
Prism, a news site led by women of color, centers the voices of marginalized people in its reporting
“If you’re going to shift narratives in this country, you need people to actually read what you’re doing.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
Is Facebook too big to know? The Markup has a plan (and a browser) to wrap its arms around it
The Citizen Browser Project will pay 1,200 Americans to let The Markup monitor the choices that tech company algorithms are making for them. “What are they choosing to amplify? And what are they choosing not to amplify?”
By Joshua Benton
Here’s how entrepreneurial local journalists are fighting back against Alden Global Capital
“I just determined that I would rather do anything else in life than to dismantle a proud newsroom and lay off my friends and colleagues and eventually be laid off myself.”
By Dan Kennedy
The Journalism Creators Program at CUNY teaches participants to launch their own news products, from wherever they are
One lesson from pandemic times is that journalism education doesn’t have to happen in person, and remote learning can open up more opportunities for journalists to launch their own products.
By Hanaa' Tameez
Google releases new tools for journalists — and shares insider insight on what’s trending on the search platform
Pinpoint, which uses AI and machine learning to help reporters sift through investigative materials, is part of the recently-released Journalist Studio.
Older people and Republicans are most likely to share Covid-19 stories from fake news sites on Twitter
The far-right site The Gateway Pundit was by far was the most-shared fake news domain; in some months, its stories were shared almost as often as stories from The New York Times, The Washington Post, and CNN.
What We’re Reading
Protocol / Janko Roettgers
Netflix is testing an audio-only mode to compete with podcasts and audiobooks
“The feature allows users to stream just the audio track of a show or movie in the background. This would effectively allow for a listening experience that’s similar to podcasts or audiobooks, while also cutting down on data consumption.”
Election Integrity Partnership / Kate Starbird, Michael Caulfield, Renee DiResta, Jevin West, Emma Spiro, Nicole Buckley, Rachel Moran, and Morgan Wack
Uncertainty and misinformation: What to expect on Election Night and days after
“There will be efforts to deter voting with images and videos of long lines, Covid-19 dangers, and protests.”
NPR / David Folkenflik
With a late-night move, Voice of America targets its own journalists’ independence
Michael Pack, a Trump appointee who assumed leadership of the U.S. Agency for Global Media in June, eliminated a regulatory “firewall” intended to protect journalists at Voice of America and its affiliated newsrooms from political interference. Pack argued the policy interfered with his mandate “to support the foreign policy of the United States.'”
Washington Post / Margaret Sullivan
Pro-Trump voices have Mark Zuckerberg’s ear. Is that why Facebook undermines liberal news sites?
“In other words, working the refs has been highly effective.”
Deez Links / Delia Cai
Wtf re: that Nick Quah profile
“At the end of the day, I’m a little personally horrified. All I wanted was to read a profile about someone with a background and identity similar to mine who’s built an impressive niche media empire. But this profile reduced Nick to a token at best and an interloper at worst. I mean jesus christ. Is that what this industry thinks of people like us?”
Axios / Sara Fischer
Ahead of the election, tech platforms are experimenting with pre-bunking to combat misinformation
“Pre-bunking is a less polarizing way to address misinformation than trying to apply judgements to posts after they’ve been shared. ‘Research shows that the best time to give people accurate information is the first time they see or interact with a claim. By definition fact-checking is after the fact.'”
The New Yorker / Yasmine Al-Sayyad and Benedict Moran
What do foreign journalists make of the U.S. election?
“Foreigners think they know the U.S. and Americans and they really don’t. I mean, they think that someday Americans will wake up and realize that it’s not good to have all those firearms. It’s not going to happen. I reached the conclusion that we don’t understand them and they don’t understand us, which is why it’s great working in this country, because it is fun to keep being baffled by what happens.”
Digiday / Max Willens
Bloomberg Media works to break down barriers between its ads and subscriber businesses
Originally built in-house to support Bloomberg’s subscription business, an A/B testing tool called ABBA is now being used to support the ad team’s work of optimizing its products and campaigns. It’s one part of a larger effort to better merge the two business sides.
Wall Street Journal / Lukas I. Alpert
BuzzFeed expects to break even for the first time since 2014, thanks to heavy cost cutting
BuzzFeed offset a steep decline in advertising with around $30 million in cost cuts, “a mix of furloughs, pay reductions, layoffs and other changes meant to stabilize the company’s finances through the pandemic, the people said.”
Substack / Josh Sternberg
What’s a newspaper presidential endorsement worth?
As of today, there are only six publications that are endorsing Trump for reelection, including an editorial in the Spokane Spokesman Review that urges its readers to vote for Trump, even though he’s “a bully and bigot.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.