Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Evoking empathy or seeking solidarity: Which is preferable when covering people without homes?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Evoking empathy or seeking solidarity: Which is preferable when covering people without homes?
Plus: How journalists cover global infectious disease, how audiences think news organizations should improve trust, and “news minimalists and omnivores.”
By Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis
Lots of visible likes and shares on social lead people to spread more misinformation
When people saw that a questionable piece of content had been liked and shared lots of times, they were more likely to share it themselves
By Laura Hazard Owen
How much does fake coronavirus news affect people’s real-life health behavior?
And what about Trump’s hydroxychloroquine and bleach proclamations?
By Laura Hazard Owen
An open letter to the new CEO of The New York Times
Meredith Kopit Levien, everyone seems to agree, is the right person to lead the Times into the 2020s. But here’s hoping she’ll view her mission more broadly — including the state of local news in America.
By Joshua Benton
Newsonomics: The New York Times’ new CEO, Meredith Levien, on building a world-class digital media business — and a tech company
“Engineering now is the second largest functional area at the New York Times, only behind journalism, and the largest function by far on the business side.”
By Ken Doctor
South Africa’s Oxpeckers is powering up geo-journalism for investigative environmental reporting
Now, expanding beyond its home base in southern Africa, Oxpeckers has been developing new tools to cover the illegal wildlife trade.
By Gregory Francois and Shruti Kedia
A lesson in automated journalism: Bring back the humans
“We’ve found that artificial Intelligence is smart, but it’s not yet smart enough to make final decisions or avoid the robotic repetition that is an unfortunate trait of, um, robots.”
By Bill Adair and Mark Stencel
News organizations are trying something new: Peace and quiet
“We were like, ‘It’s OK, you can have some silence.'”
By Rachel del Valle
This is how FiveThirtyEight is trying to build the right amount of uncertainty into its 2020 election data analysis
Our analysis finds a 99 percent chance someone will still complain about it.
By Joshua Benton
Back to school: A new podcast trendlet is shows explaining public schools and public housing
Plus: What the Times paid for Serial, Spotify thinks that what podcasts need is more video, Headgum raises $2 million, transnational Asian podcasts, and more.
By Nicholas Quah
Evoking empathy or seeking solidarity: Which is preferable when covering people without homes?
Plus: How journalists cover global infectious disease, how audiences think news organizations should improve trust, and “news minimalists and omnivores.”
By Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis
Lots of visible likes and shares on social lead people to spread more misinformation
When people saw that a questionable piece of content had been liked and shared lots of times, they were more likely to share it themselves
How much does fake coronavirus news affect people’s real-life health behavior?
And what about Trump’s hydroxychloroquine and bleach proclamations?
What We’re Reading
The New York Times / Kashmir Hill
This tool could protect your photos from facial recognition
It “disguises photos with pixel-level changes that confuse facial recognition systems…If deployed across millions of images, it would be a broadside against facial recognition systems, poisoning the accuracy of the so-called data sets they gather from the web.” One downside: “Women get mustaches, and guys get extra eyelashes or eye shadow.”
Reuters / Yew Lun Tian and Brenda Goh
China says it will retaliate if the U.S. forces out Chinese journalists
“Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told reporters at a daily briefing that no Chinese journalist in the United States had been granted a visa extension since the United States, on May 11, limited their stay to 90 days, with an option to extend.”
Axios / Sara Fischer
Bloomberg subscribers will now be able to bundle a subscription to The Athletic
Bloomberg began a similar deal with The Information in February. “The subscription landscape is growing so competitive that news companies banding together to sell joint subscription packages may be the next big trend.”
Journalism.co.uk / Marcela Kunova
112 non-white speakers you need at your next journalism event to avoid “whanels”
“Although we have a 50:50 gender representation policy in place, which means that we want at least half of our speakers to be women and avoid ‘manels,’ we have not been equally intentional about the proportion of non-white experts. That is set to change.”
Medium / Matt 'TK' Taylor
What we learned from rebuilding our editions CMS for The Times of London
“In the previous system, editions over the course of the day were overwritten when the latest update was published. This meant throwing a lot of useful data away, a lot of which we were technically paying for in terms of journalistic decision making.”
Press Gazette / Freddy Mayhew
Remote work policies in newsrooms may become permanent post-COVID
“We envision the long-term future of work at the FT to be more flexible and involve remote working, at least part of the time.”
MediaPost / Wendy Davis
A new ad industry group will lobby Google and Apple to let them track people more
“The new Partnership for Responsible Addressable Media…says it wants to ‘advance and protect’ ad companies’ ability to serve personalized digital ads and collect data used for analytics, while also ‘safeguarding privacy and improving the consumer experience.'”
Meduza
Reporting on a coronavirus outbreak in Russia can get you in trouble with state censors
“Russia’s state censor has filed administrative cases against the independent newspaper Novaya Gazeta and its editor-in-chief, Dmitry Muratov, for supposed “fake news stories” about coronavirus outbreaks in Chechnya and inside the Russian Army.”
CJR / Amanda Darrach
Vietnam War photojournalists on how to cover COVID better
“When a guy was killed in Vietnam, there was a big hoopla as he came home. The flag-draped coffin, and the bugler playing taps. The family was given the flag, and everybody would gather around for the burial. It was a very traditional way of mourning. COVID, you take your loved one to the hospital, and you never see them again.”
Local Media Association / David Arkin
Why a newspaper in Connecticut focused on growing food content
“The effort was so successful that it was recognized as the Best New Digital Initiative in the Local Media Association’s Digital Innovation Awards, for news organizations under 750,000 unique users.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.