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How YouTube’s recommendations pull you away from news
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How YouTube’s recommendations pull you away from news
Plus: News participation is declining, online and offline; making personal phone calls could help with digital-subscriber churn; and partly automated news videos seem to work with audiences.
By Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis
Apple brings free call recording and transcription to iPhones; journalists rejoice
“There are decades where nothing happens, and there are weeks when decades happen.”
By Joshua Benton
What can The Wall Street Journal’s new ad campaign tell us about its future?
The new brand campaign is aimed at younger versions of existing Journal readers. The various “It’s Your Business” ads center some of the newsroom’s edgier and more evergreen journalism.
By Sarah Scire
“Neither feast nor famine”: In 2023, nonprofit news continued to grow — but the audience picture is more complicated
While the sector is still growing, that growth is slowing, by some metrics. And audience data for 2023 shows that across all outlets surveyed, average monthly web traffic fell.
By Sophie Culpepper
Scenes from the trial of Ozy’s Carlos Watson
Ozy’s Instagram account is calling for supporters to pack the courtroom as “Justice Watchers.”
By Joshua Benton
Does curiosity make you read more hard news? How about anxiety?
A new study finds that certain personality traits might make you exaggerate — or underestimate — how much political news you consume.
By Joshua Benton
What’s in a byline? For Hoodline’s AI-generated local news, everything — and nothing
None of the AI writers seems to have a specific beat, except possibly for what can be best described as “police exploits,” which they all cover with gusto.
By Neel Dhanesha
How YouTube’s recommendations pull you away from news
Plus: News participation is declining, online and offline; making personal phone calls could help with digital-subscriber churn; and partly automated news videos seem to work with audiences.
By Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis
Apple brings free call recording and transcription to iPhones; journalists rejoice
“There are decades where nothing happens, and there are weeks when decades happen.”
What can The Wall Street Journal’s new ad campaign tell us about its future?
The new brand campaign is aimed at younger versions of existing Journal readers. The various “It’s Your Business” ads center some of the newsroom’s edgier and more evergreen journalism.
What We’re Reading
Puck / Dylan Byers
CNN has struck a deal with the Associated Press
CNN will use AP’s copy for digital stories for the first time since CNN canceled its contract with the AP in 2010 to focus more on original reporting. “The deal would appear to portend further staff cuts, and that’s certainly how some CNN insiders are reading it.”
the Guardian / Chris Stein
D.C. crime news trackers aim to inform — but are they being used for a right-wing agenda?
“While many describe what they are doing as journalism, others in the city have accused them of insensitivity in their coverage, or exaggerations that make the region’s crime looks worse than it is. In a fraught election year, their local footprint could have widespread impact.”
The New York Times / Jack Nicas
No, a remote Amazon tribe did not get addicted to porn
“Many of the sites that distorted this detail are news aggregators, meaning their business model is largely designed around repackaging the reporting of other news organizations, with often sensationalist headlines to sell ads…To an informed internet user, their tactics are familiar. For the Marubo, however, the experience was bewildering and infuriating.”
Android Authority / C. Scott Brown
In a strange twist, a real photo just won an AI photo contest
“I feel bad about leading the jury astray, but I think that they are professionals who might find that this jab at AI and its ethical implications outweighs the ethical implications of deceiving the viewer, which, of course is ironic because that is what AI does.” – Photographer Miles Astray
WIRED / Vittoria Elliott
An AI bot is (sort of) running for mayor in Wyoming
“‘I realized that this entity is way smarter than me, and more importantly, way better than some of the outward-facing public servants I see,’ [said Victor Miller]. According to Miller, [the chatbot he created] will make the decisions and Miller will be its ‘meat puppet,’ attending meetings, signing documents, and otherwise doing the corporeal job of running the city.”
NPR / Meg Anderson
This prison newspaper has been publishing for more than a century
“The Prison Mirror is one of the oldest prison newspapers in the country, running since 1887. Publications like this aren’t common, but in an era where many journalism outlets in the free world are struggling to thrive amid scores of layoffs, journalism behind bars is actually growing.”
Pew Research Center / Elisa Shearer, Sarah Naseer, Jacob Liedke, and Katerina Eva Matsa
How Americans get news on TikTok, X, Facebook and Instagram
“Majorities of Facebook, Instagram and TikTok users say keeping up with news is not a reason they use the sites. X (formerly Twitter) is the exception to this pattern: Most X users say that keeping up with news is either a major or minor reason they use the platform, and about half say they regularly get news there.”
Axios / Cuneyt Dil
Will Lewis seems to want to bring back the Post’s local coverage
Lewis and colleagues are apparently floating an idea called “Local+,” a new offering “for readers who want to pay extra for premium local content.” This is quite a change of tune, given the Post’s Bezos-era turn towards becoming the “Everything Newspaper” and the cuts it made to the metro desk as part of last year’s buyouts.
Poynter / Amaris Castillo
How ProPublica kept focus on humanity at every stage of series on homelessness and possession loss
Pen and ink illustrations, written testimonials, ride-alongs with advocates, and dozens of interviews helped shape the first in what is going to be an ongoing series of stories about homelessness.
The Guardian / Erum Salam
Book about book bans banned by Florida school board
Alan Gratz, author of Ban This Book: “They banned the book because it talks about the books that they have banned and because it talks about book banning. It feels like they know exactly what they’re doing and they’re somewhat ashamed of what they’re doing and they don’t want a book on the shelves that calls them out.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.