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Republicans and Democrats live in “nearly inverse news media environments,” Pew finds
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Republicans and Democrats live in “nearly inverse news media environments,” Pew finds
“In the more compact Republican media ecosystem, one outlet towers above all others: Fox News. It would be hard to overstate its connection as a trusted go-to source of political news for Republicans.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
The Wuhan coronavirus is the latest front for medical misinformation. How will China handle it?
Plus: Facebook allows “rampant climate denialism” around the Australian wildfires, and female politicians in India face a disproportionate amount of trolling.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Newsonomics: Here are 20 epiphanies for the news business of the 2020s
After ten years of writing for Nieman Lab, Ken takes a big look back and ahead, defining the state of affairs for the troubled world of journalism.
By Ken Doctor
Here’s how The New York Times tested blockchain to help you identify faked photos on your timeline
“What we saw was a tendency to accept almost all images at first glance, regardless of subject area.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
Public infrastructure isn’t just bridges and water mains: Here’s an argument for extending the concept to digital spaces
“Our solutions cannot be limited to asking these platforms to do a better job of meeting their civic obligations — we need to consider what technologies we want and need for digital media to have a productive role in democratic societies.”
By Joshua Benton
Would acquiring The Ringer move Spotify to the top of the Podcast Pyramid?
Plus: new leadership coming to the BBC, a Scottish podcast network debuts, and a Public Radio Palooza.
By Nicholas Quah
What do we want? Unbiased reporting! When do we want it? During protests!
Not all protests get treated equally. Stories about women’s marches and anti-Trump protests give more voice to the protesters than those about Black Lives Matter and other anti-racism protests.
By Danielle Kilgo
Instagram is busy fact-checking memes and rainbow hills while leaving political lies alone
Plus: Emphasizing a publisher’s name on social doesn’t seem to impact readers’ misinfo radar much one way or the other.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Is this video “missing context,” “transformed,” or “edited”? This effort wants to standardize how we categorize visual misinformation
MediaReview wants to turn the mishmash vocabulary around manipulated photos and video into something structured.
By Joshua Benton
YouTube’s algorithm is pushing climate misinformation videos, and their creators are profiting from it
One-fifth of the ads on climate misinformation videos were from Greenpeace, World Wildlife Fund, or other green/environmental groups.
By Hanaa' Tameez
Putting news on stage: Bringing journalism back to the theater as a public space
Audiences want proximity and, perhaps more than ever, humanity. Telling stories in a real physical space can be an antidote to the virtual epidemic.
By Catherine Adams
Republicans and Democrats live in “nearly inverse news media environments,” Pew finds
“In the more compact Republican media ecosystem, one outlet towers above all others: Fox News. It would be hard to overstate its connection as a trusted go-to source of political news for Republicans.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
The Wuhan coronavirus is the latest front for medical misinformation. How will China handle it?
Plus: Facebook allows “rampant climate denialism” around the Australian wildfires, and female politicians in India face a disproportionate amount of trolling.
Newsonomics: Here are 20 epiphanies for the news business of the 2020s
After ten years of writing for Nieman Lab, Ken takes a big look back and ahead, defining the state of affairs for the troubled world of journalism.
What We’re Reading
Digiday / Max Willens
Newspapers are chasing philanthropic grants to fill coverage gaps

“What’s unclear is whether donations and grants will become a fixture in news publishers’ budgets and plans. For one thing, grants and donations often cover short durations. While some publications have secured support for multiyear projects, most nonprofit-funding grants support programs that last only a few months.”

Quartz / Jeremy B. Merrill
How Quartz used AI to sort through the Luanda Leaks
“We’ll be using this approach on Quartz’s investigative team to search through political Facebook ads—so we can find ads making various interesting or problematic claims, even if we don’t know any of the keywords that might be present.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Hamilton Nolan
How the Washington Post pulled off the hardest trick in journalism

“The necessary fluff of newsmaking is usually either denied outright, or swept desperately under the rug when company comes over. Since Jeff Bezos bought the Post in 2013, it has carried on with its traditional reporting while adding a fearsome clickbait machine.”

Boing Boing / Mark Fraunfelder
Happy 20th birthday to Boing Boing, a zine turned blog turned keeper of the old-web flame
“It’s incredible to me that Boing Boing still has the original band line-up. I’m always excited to see what my co-editors post every day, and Boing Boing remains my favorite place on the Web, because I love their points of view.”
Local News Initiative / Mark Jacob
The Salt Lake Tribune’s editor expects a lot of newspapers to join it in nonprofit status
“The short-term piece is to expand our reader revenue, to expand our audiences — Utah is a growing state with a booming economy. And we just need to make sure that people understand the unique role that we play in this ecosystem. But the long-term plan is to build up the endowment to throw off enough money to sustain local news, not just the Tribune but elsewhere.”
The Guardian / Gaby Hinsliff
“The BBC needs to be defended — or its opponents will destroy it”
“Barely anyone has a good word to say for the poor old Beeb, consumed as it is by accusations of supposed political bias against every political faction going; which is why whoever succeeds the outgoing director-general, Tony Hall, has their work cut out. But it’s a public good all the same, and one we will regret letting slip through our fingers.”
Global Investigative Journalism Network / Rowan Philp
“Reality Journalism” turns investigative reports into pop idol-style shows

“In Kenya, surveys show that about 4 million people watched the Top Story reality journalism show each week, while tens of thousands have viewed the Journalistic Battles series on the YouTube channel of Armenian public television.”

Quartz / Olivia Goldhill
How YouTube shields advertisers (not viewers) from harmful videos
“When it comes to prohibiting hate speech on YouTube in general, the company has a looser set of community guidelines, with a slightly narrower definition of hate speech than in advertising guidelines.”
The New York Times / Robert D. McFadden
Jim Lehrer, longtime PBS News anchor, is dead at 85

“A low-key, courtly Texan who worked on Dallas newspapers in the 1960s and began his PBS career in the 1970s, Mr. Lehrer saw himself as ‘a print/word person at heart’ and his program as a kind of newspaper for television, with high regard for balanced and objective reporting. He was an oasis of civility in a news media that thrived on excited headlines, gotcha questions and noisy confrontations.”

The Morning Context / Harveen Ahluwalia
Bloomberg TV’s Indian woes seem to have no end
“The BQ fiasco is Bloomberg’s third—and most expensive—failed attempt to build a TV brand in the country. India also remains the only market that Bloomberg TV has entered and has not been able to make a mark.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.