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Covid vaccine fact-checks have a problem: Few people are clicking
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Covid vaccine fact-checks have a problem: Few people are clicking
Fact-checks struggle to compete with disinformation on major social media networks.
By First Draft Staff
The AP’s handling of Emily Wilder is just the latest example of journalism’s longstanding weakness against partisans who cry bias
It’s like kryptonite for responsible news organizations: the stronger their piety to journalistic ethics and the ideal of objectivity, the more vulnerable they are to accusations made in bad faith.
By Matthew Jordan
A packed set of Apple announcements could have big impacts on news publishers — for good and for ill
The news alerts you send to iPhones might be about to disappear from your users’ screens. The bedrock metric of the newsletter business just got murdered. (But there’s good news, too.)
By Joshua Benton
Do journalists “hide behind” sources when they use numbers in the news?
Plus: Challenging “getting it first vs. getting it right,” data journalism for marginalized communities, and determining what news organizations cover as terrorism.
By Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis
When all else fails: An internet outage sends news publishers scrambling for a backup plan
Some options: Google Docs, Twitter, or just sitting quietly for a while while you wait for the technological gears to come unstuck.
By Joshua Benton
Ted Williams proved local news can be profitable. Now, he’ll try to replicate the success for Axios.
“As time goes on, even when you’re financially successful in media, the tendency is to do more and more stuff. If I look at media companies who are poorly run, everyone is really busy, stressed out, and they’re not making money.”
By Sarah Scire
Deplatforming works, this new data on Trump tweets shows
It’s not just the reach that a platform offers; it’s the whole package of affordances.
By Joshua Benton
Is Twitter Blue a good enough product to earn your $3 a month?
There’s one feature that could be very useful for journalists and other Twitter packrats, but otherwise, it’s kinda meh. (And no, that’s not a real edit button.)
By Joshua Benton
The Washington Post opinion section is leaning into local with “Voices Across America”
Voices Across America is looking for writers who can write about where they live with sufficient authority to be credible to their neighbors, but with sufficient altitude to be compelling to readers anywhere.
By Hanaa' Tameez
Spotting hoaxes: How young people in Africa use cues to spot misinformation online
Some college students surveyed showed substantial media literacy — but being able to recognize a fake story didn’t always deter them from sharing it.
By Chikezie E. Uzuegbunam, Dani Madrid-Morales, Emeka Umejei, Etse Sikanku, Gregory Gondwe, Herman Wasserman, Khulekani Ndlovu, and Melissa Tully
Nearly 40% of Americans already believe Covid-19 leaked from a lab. What happens if they turn out to be right?
Plus: “Media news consumption is by far the strongest independent predictor of QAnon beliefs.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
The local news crisis will be solved one community at a time
Though the collapse of community journalism is real enough, we believe that its causes are only partly understood.
By Ellen Clegg and Dan Kennedy
Body cameras help monitor police — but what do they mean for citizens’ privacy?
There are potential social costs to deploying body-worn cameras, including possible invasions of privacy when sensitive moments are recorded or made public.
By Bryce Newell
Covid vaccine fact-checks have a problem: Few people are clicking
Fact-checks struggle to compete with disinformation on major social media networks.
By First Draft Staff
The AP’s handling of Emily Wilder is just the latest example of journalism’s longstanding weakness against partisans who cry bias
It’s like kryptonite for responsible news organizations: the stronger their piety to journalistic ethics and the ideal of objectivity, the more vulnerable they are to accusations made in bad faith.
A packed set of Apple announcements could have big impacts on news publishers — for good and for ill
The news alerts you send to iPhones might be about to disappear from your users’ screens. The bedrock metric of the newsletter business just got murdered. (But there’s good news, too.)
What We’re Reading
Mashable / Jack Morse
Twitter will add a newsletter “subscribe” button to profiles
The “subscribe” button will be available to anyone with a Revue account (sorry, Substackers). Newsletters can be free or paid, and Twitter will take a 5 percent cut of any subscription revenue.
The Texas Tribune
The Texas Tribune’s Revenue Lab is hiring a new director
The training and innovation center is funded by “a generous grant” from the Facebook Journalism Project.
Washington Post / Margaret Sullivan
Only in our anti-truth hellscape could Anthony Fauci become a supervillain
“During the Trump administration, many on the right unfortunately learned the lesson that they could make up almost anything and people would believe it,” said Laura Helmuth, editor in chief of Scientific American. “But science is a challenge to that.”
Toronto Star / Jamie Irving
ESPN / Sarah Spain
“The details differ, but the story is the same”: Sexual harassment in sports media is the norm
“A common refrain in cases of athletes found guilty of sexual assault is a mourning of their lost potential. The touchdowns that might have been scored! The games that might have been won! … Our obsession with sport clouds our morality and allows us to favor the men who thrill us over the women they harass.”
The Guardian / Rachel Aroesti
Can shows like Reply All find success after scandal?
“‘We don’t know if it’s going to work,’ [new cohost Emmanuel] Dzotsi said of the show’s reboot. He is not alone in feeling that way.”
New York Times / Katie Robertson
The head of the Committee to Protect Journalists offers a warning as he prepares to step down
“When journalists get arrested at protests in the United States, those images echo around the world and they send a message to so many places that this is the way police behave even in democratic countries. And therefore, arresting journalists at protests in Moscow or covering protests in Myanmar, which we’re seeing now, is less shocking and generates less attention.”
Better News / Curtis Huber and Kati Erwert
How The Seattle Times boosted subscriber retention with longer grace periods and better credit card management
It’s not “glamorous” work but “unintentional churn is at its lowest point in our history of digital subscriptions at 9.72% annually.”
New York Times / Kashmir Hill and Daisuke Wakabayashi
Google will change its algorithm to break the “vicious cycle of online slander”
“The company plans to change its search algorithm to prevent websites, which operate under domains like BadGirlReport.date and PredatorsAlert.us, from appearing in the list of results when someone searches for a person’s name … ‘These sites are, frankly, gaming our system.'”
An open letter on U.S. media coverage of Palestine
More than 200 journalists sign an open letter calling for the U.S. media to improve its coverage of Palestine
“As journalists, we are entrusted with a profoundly important mission in a free and democratic society, the power to inform the people and guide the national conversation, from the family dinner table to Capitol Hill. We are calling on journalists to tell the full, contextualized truth without fear or favor, to recognize that obfuscating Israel’s oppression of Palestinians fails this industry’s own objectivity standards.”
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