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Airbnb’s “Home Alone” stunt is confusing me and news coverage has answered literally zero of my questions about it
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Overwhelmingly white but leaning female: See the results of the Canadian Association of Journalists’ inaugural diversity survey
Nearly 75% of Canadian newsrooms are made up of white journalists, and 80% of newsrooms have no Black or Indigenous journalists on staff.
By Shraddha Chakradhar
FTC: Let digital subscribers click to cancel. Newspapers: Hey, not so fast.
A look around the internet suggests the FTC hasn’t scared news orgs into immediately changing the options they offer online.
By Sarah Scire
How researchers used decades of Wall Street Journal articles to predict stock market returns
Based on an analysis of 763,887 Wall Street Journal articles published from 1984 to 2017, researchers found that news coverage of particular topics predicts 25% of average fluctuations in stock market returns.
By Clark Merrefield
Project Veritas and the mainstream media are strange allies in the fight to protect press freedom
If the government narrowly defines “the press” based on its political outlook or ethics, then no news organization is safe from attacks by future administrations.
By Jane Kirtley
Slow down, take small steps: OpenNews’ Sisi Wei on how little changes can lead to big ones
“We can make change together as opposed to trying to depend on one person to lead us all. When I think about making change that way, it becomes so much more accessible.”
By Janelle Salanga
He’ll keep the blue check, though: Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is stepping down
His replacement, CTO Parag Agrawal, had only tweeted 10 times in 2021 before today.
By Joshua Benton
Now nonprofit, The Salt Lake Tribune has achieved something rare for a local newspaper: financial sustainability
The Salt Lake Tribune’s transition to nonprofit status has been closely watched in the news industry. “The opportunity for us to prove that this can work is significant and so is the responsibility.”
By Sarah Scire
Address — don’t sidestep — health misinformation to debunk falsehoods, study finds
“Don’t be afraid to tackle misinformation head on. It’s important that people speak out, and you can repeat [misinformation] and then debunk it.”
By Shraddha Chakradhar
A rose is a rose is a rose, but please, please make it clear to your readers what a “subscriber” is
Do you mean “people who pay a news company hundreds of dollars a year”? Or “email addresses we have in a spreadsheet somewhere”?
By Joshua Benton
The vulture is hungry again: Alden Global Capital wants to buy a few hundred more newspapers
This time it’s Lee Enterprises in the cross-hairs. Adding it to its empire would leave two American local newspaper giants — Gannett and Alden — and everyone else far behind.
By Joshua Benton
Overwhelmingly white but leaning female: See the results of the Canadian Association of Journalists’ inaugural diversity survey
Nearly 75% of Canadian newsrooms are made up of white journalists, and 80% of newsrooms have no Black or Indigenous journalists on staff.
FTC: Let digital subscribers click to cancel. Newspapers: Hey, not so fast.
A look around the internet suggests the FTC hasn’t scared news orgs into immediately changing the options they offer online.
What We’re Reading
Columbia Journalism Review / Jacob L. Nelson
A Twitter tightrope without a net: Journalists’ reactions to newsroom social media policies
“[The report] draws on interviews with 37 reporters, editors, publishers, freelancers, and social media/audience engagement managers from throughout the U.S. about their experiences with and thoughts about their newsrooms’ social media policies.”
The Baltimore Sun / Christopher Dinsmore
Baltimore Sun Media proposes moving printing of newspapers to Delaware
“The shift, proposed to occur by the end of January, likely would result in the loss of more than 100 jobs, most of them full-time.”
The New York Times / Reid J. Epstein
Two Georgia election workers targeted by pro-Trump media sue for defamation
“Ms. Moss, who continues to work for the Fulton County elections board, and Ms. Freeman, a temporary employee during the 2020 election, were ensnared by the Trump-supporting media and Mr. Trump himself after Gateway Pundit published dozens of false stories about them, starting last December and continuing through this November. The stories called the two women ‘crooked Democrats’ and claimed that they ‘pulled out suitcases full of ballots and began counting those ballots without election monitors in the room.’”
The Verge / Makena Kelly
As tech founders resign, Congress loses its favorite targets
“Dorsey’s departure from Twitter, coming shortly after Bezos left Amazon, seemingly marks a new phase of tech skepticism in Washington, a shift away from the ‘brilliant founder’ narrative and into a more mature critique of these companies as powerful institutions. Without memeable leaders like Dorsey or Bezos to haul in for splashy, dunk-filled hearings, lawmakers will have more incentive to work on the boring stuff: actually writing policy to change these companies’ behaviors.”
Twitter / Michael Luo
Clare Malone returns to the New Yorker as a contributing writer covering media business and journalism
“This marks Clare’s return to The New Yorker, where she previously worked as a fact checker for nearly two years, starting in 2014.”
The Washington Post / Paul Farhi and Elahe Izadi
News organizations join Bannon’s battle to get Jan. 6 prosecution documents
“The legal brief submitted by The Post, the New York Times, CNN, NBC News and others creates strange bedfellows. It aligns some of the biggest news organizations with one of their harshest critics.”
Twitter / The Open Notebook
A new online course could help you better detect — and avoid — scientific B.S.
“This free course will teach you to recognize telltale signs of hype and distortion, spot the most common kinds of statistical trickery, assess the quality of scientific evidence, and recognize when sources have financial conflicts of interest.”
The Associated Press
Swift selling local media assets to Ogden Newspapers
“With the acquisition, Ogden Newspapers will publish 54 daily newspapers and a number of weekly newspapers and magazines in 18 states, according to The Aspen Times, which is owned by Swift. Terms of the deal, set to close Dec. 31, were not released.”
The New York Times / Kim Severson
Substack is expanding its food content with newsletters from Ruth Reichl and others
“Ms. Reichl has committed to producing a month’s worth of free daily newsletters as a writer in residence. If the project takes off and she likes the process, she said, she will begin a newsletter that requires a subscription. Ms. Reichl joins a collection of food writers who will debut Dec. 1 as part of what the platform is calling ‘Substack Food.’”
The Associated Press
From a world ablaze to moments of hope, see some of the images AP photographers captured in 2021
“’Some say the world will end in fire,’ wrote the poet Robert Frost — and for much of 2021, Associated Press photographers captured scenes of a world ablaze, amid rumblings of ruin.”
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