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Axios launches a premium subscription product aimed at the “dealmakers” among us
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Axios launches a premium subscription product aimed at the “dealmakers” among us
After a two-week free trial, Axios Pro costs $600/year for one newsletter or $1,800/year for all Pro newsletters. (There’s no monthly option.)
By Sarah Scire
A new report shows the impact of racial justice protests in 2020 on three local newspapers
A study of crime reporting in three major U.S. dailies found coverage included less dehumanizing language by the end of the year.
By Shraddha Chakradhar
Does having stronger local newspapers make people more likely to follow COVID safety guidelines? Er, not so much
A new study finds that the more local newspapers there were in a county, the worse it performed on a measure of social distancing in the early days of the pandemic. But take the findings with a grain of salt.
By Joshua Benton
How newsrooms are experimenting with Twitter Spaces
“We’re starting to wonder, ‘Okay, can this work as a social audio conversation? How can we get more voices on this whether from the audience or our sources?'”
By Sarah Scire
This is what it’s like to be a media company’s first-ever online safety editor
“What’s really struck me is the variety of issues I’ve seen reported in recent weeks. Not one of them has been the same.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
Fact-checking may be important, but it won’t help Americans learn to disagree better
“The more that a study looked like the real world, the less fact-checking changed participants’ minds.”
By Taylor Dotson
Can U.S. journalism truly serve global audiences? Not if it treats them like an afterthought
What would a truly global media company look like?
By Anita Zielina
“The idea and techniques of investigative reporting can be done by anyone anywhere”: How Francisco Vara-Orta wants to change IRE’s mission
“We all grew up with All the President’s Men. You don’t want to take away from the power of that moment and the press holding the administration accountable. But we have to think, why was there not a Black person or a woman on that team?”
By Janelle Salanga
KPCC and LAist are shifting the focus of their politics coverage from politicians to voters. Here’s why.
“Our goal is to reenergize demoralized readers and listeners who’ve given up on civic involvement amid all the vein-popping vitriol.”
By Tony Marcano
How old laws are being used to shut down independent journalism in Hong Kong
Hong Kong’s sedition laws were introduced in the early 20th century and had been unused since the 1970s. Now they are being used to charge Apple Daily and Stand News journalists.
By Yan-Ho Lai and Yuen Chan
How big a threat is The Athletic to local newspapers under The New York Times?
Should the combination keep local publishers up at night? Or are they different markets altogether?
By Joshua Benton
Axios launches a premium subscription product aimed at the “dealmakers” among us
After a two-week free trial, Axios Pro costs $600/year for one newsletter or $1,800/year for all Pro newsletters. (There’s no monthly option.)
By Sarah Scire
A new report shows the impact of racial justice protests in 2020 on three local newspapers
A study of crime reporting in three major U.S. dailies found coverage included less dehumanizing language by the end of the year.
Does having stronger local newspapers make people more likely to follow COVID safety guidelines? Er, not so much
A new study finds that the more local newspapers there were in a county, the worse it performed on a measure of social distancing in the early days of the pandemic. But take the findings with a grain of salt.
What We’re Reading
Politico
“Is the media doomed?” 16 “future-minded thinkers” on where they think journalism will be in 15 years
“Barring an epochal change of heart or habit on the part of the public, the flow of information will only get faster and more discordant in the years ahead.”
Politico / John F. Harris
Politico’s founding editor once predicted the end of establishment media. As Politico turns 15, he says it’s time “for the pendulum to swing back in the direction of institutional power.”
“Financial power is the indispensable prerequisite for the kind of power that interests me more: Agenda-setting power. This is where media institutions, both established ones and the relative newcomers like POLITICO, need to reclaim ground.”
NPR.org / Kelly McBride
NPR’s public editor: Nina Totenberg’s story on the Supreme Court mask controversy merits a clarification
“No one has challenged the broader focus of Totenberg’s original story, which asserts that the justices in general are not getting along well. The controversy over the anecdotal lead, which was intended to be illustrative, has overwhelmed the uncontested premise of the story.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Covering Climate Now
Uproot Project’s Monica Samayoa on climate coverage by and for communities of color
“Climate change disproportionately affects communities of color and lower-income communities, but these stories really get overlooked; because of that, the climate crisis is not seen as a crisis by everyone. By encouraging journalists of color to work on these stories, we want to make clear, ‘Hey, this is already happening. It’s not something we’re expecting in the future. The climate crisis is here.’”
The New York Times / Julie Turkewitz and Mitra Taj
In Peru, courts “used like whips” to silence journalists
“The author of a book about a powerful politician has been sentenced to two years in prison. Media advocates say the case is part of a trend in which the courts are being used to punish critics.”
TikTok / Taylor Lorenz
“TikTok is uniquely good at facilitating these mass, viral, collaborative investigations”: Taylor Lorenz on West Elm Caleb and the consequences of online harassment
“It’s also incredibly disappointing to see big media companies frame this as ‘drama’ content and basically strip this man who we know zero about(!!) of any humanity,” Lorenz said in a Twitter thread.
The Information / Mahira Dayal
TikTok is testing ways to join the paid-accounts bandwagon
“A subscription model for TikTok could mimic Instagram, but it might have to look very different because of the app’s robust For You page algorithm, which has users scrolling on the app for hours without the need to follow individual creators.”
Press Gazette / Charlotte Tobitt
Why BBC News dropped Snapchat and is avoiding TikTok
“We have to be true to our brand, true to BBC News. So what we’re not going to do is light news on TikTok. If we go onto TikTok, we’d be true to the news brand so we’d be able to report any news in the way that we’d want to… We’re only going to go on to these platforms if editorially we think they’re the right platforms to be on.”
Press Gazette / Andrew Kersley
How Bellingcat tries to stay one step ahead of Putin
“A new Russia team is being established led by Christo Grozev, the Bulgarian investigative journalist behind much of Bellingcat’s ongoing Russian reporting. The full-time team working for the organisation is set to grow too, giving it a total of 30 staff.”
The New York Times / Michael M. Grynbaum
Robert Costa is leaving The Washington Post for TV
Specifically, CBS News. “He is also the second well-known correspondent to exit The Post in recent days. David Fahrenthold, a 21-year veteran of the paper and a Pulitzer Prize winner for his investigations into the Trump family’s charitable donations, joined The New York Times earlier this month.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.