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Small steps, but: Most big American newspaper newsrooms are now led by someone other than a white man
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Small steps, but: Most big American newspaper newsrooms are now led by someone other than a white man
Among the 20 biggest dailies, nearly two-thirds of their newsrooms are run by a woman or a person of color (or both). But newsrooms still have a long way to go to be reflective of the communities they serve.
By Joshua Benton
Female video game journalists on what to do when the mob comes for you
“Remember 98% of the time the people harassing you are not attempting to engage with your work in good faith.”
By Luke Winkie
Nothing against the “Death Star,” but the LA Times thinks its new daily news podcast can go where the biggies can’t
“When you say national, usually what that means is New York or D.C. We’re trying to read that so that the gravity is really coming out of Southern California and expanding outward from that.”
By Sarah Scire
How The New York Times assesses, tests, and prepares for the (un)expected news event
Rather than hastily address issues in the months leading up to big events where we expected lots of reader traffic, we decided to take stock of our systems as a whole and enact longer term resilience measures.
By Alexandra Shaheen, Megan Araula, and Shawn Bower
I have come to bury Knewz, not to praise it
News Corp’s painfully named news aggregator promised to somehow battle “crass clickbait,” filter bubbles, media bias, and two trillion-dollar companies, all at once. It ended up being a D-minus Drudge clone and OnlyFans blog.
By Joshua Benton
If you’re not a climate reporter yet, you will be: Covid-19 coverage offers lessons for reporting on the climate crisis
The degree of interdisciplinary collaboration with the science desk is new, and it could prove a model for how news organizations cover the climate crisis.
By Wolfgang Blau
Cleveland’s Plain Dealer decided to “completely ignore” politicians’ “false statements and stunts.” It’s working.
“We were not going to quote Trump making his absurd claims about the election. We weren’t going to quote any of his many false statements. We were not going to give them oxygen.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
“White audiences who will pay” is still metro newspapers’ survival strategy
“We don’t write for white subscribers, but it ends up being white people who read us,” a Midwestern news executive told an audience earlier this year.
By Nikki Usher
On big tech and news publishers, Canada must follow Australia’s lead
The federal government should follow Australia’s lead in forcing arbitration between platforms and publishers when needed.
By David Skok
USA Today is getting a paywall. Who’s the audience for it?
The marketplace for online news has thus far rewarded (a) premium quality and (b) local connection. USA Today’s digital subscription offering seems likely, in its current form at least, to fall between those two stools.
By Joshua Benton
The New York Times is using Instagram slides and Twitter cards to make stories more digestible
Slides and cards are a good way to highlight the strongest part of a story, whether it’s a visual component or a tidbit that competitors don’t have.
By Hanaa' Tameez
Small steps, but: Most big American newspaper newsrooms are now led by someone other than a white man
Among the 20 biggest dailies, nearly two-thirds of their newsrooms are run by a woman or a person of color (or both). But newsrooms still have a long way to go to be reflective of the communities they serve.
By Joshua Benton
Female video game journalists on what to do when the mob comes for you
“Remember 98% of the time the people harassing you are not attempting to engage with your work in good faith.”
Nothing against the “Death Star,” but the LA Times thinks its new daily news podcast can go where the biggies can’t
“When you say national, usually what that means is New York or D.C. We’re trying to read that so that the gravity is really coming out of Southern California and expanding outward from that.”
What We’re Reading
WAN-IFRA
These are the winners of the 2021 European Digital Media Awards
Led by a whole bunch of Norwegians — NRK, VGTV, Amedia, Dagens Næringsliv, Verdens Gang — plus The Guardian, Ouest-France, and Euronews.
eMarketer
Total U.S. “influencer” spending is expected to pass $4 billion next year
For context, total U.S. newspaper advertising revenue was roughly $8.8 billion in 2020 — and has been dropping by an estimated $2.3 billion per year since 2015 — so Instagram #sponcon and its ilk could easily pass the entire newspaper business in a year or two.
CJR / Lauren Harris
The Local Live(s) project humanizes reporters by putting them onstage
“We work to find people in our community with stories that don’t typically get a spotlight. They’re all true stories, told casually in the first person, much like your aunt or uncle at a dinner party: taking that similar energy and putting it on stage. And we work with journalists to tell parts of the story that don’t make it to print: things that get taken out in the editing process, details that can be really evocative, that can make them feel a lot more relatable and a lot more human.”
The Guardian / Andrew Roth
Russia has labeled a Bellingcat local reporting partner a “foreign agent”
“The designation requires the outlets to label all their content and is said to scare off potential partners and advertisers. Organisations that are deemed as failing to comply with the law can be forced to shut….The Insider has been one of several new investigative websites to publish blockbuster exposes embarrassing to the Kremlin.”
The Guardian / Bradley Hope
Burner phones, fake sources and “evil twin” attacks: Journalism in the age of surveillance
“Counterintelligence in journalism used to be the domain of reporters digging into matters of national security or liaising with sensitive government whistleblowers; but increasingly those tactics are necessary across the board.”
Prospect
Alan Rusbridger has a new job, editing the monthly magazine Prospect
“Prospect is a cradle of ideas, good writing and thoughtful debate. Independent in its ownership and politics, it’s a meeting point where people can argue, agree—or simply agree to differ…As the pace of journalism speeds up — mirroring life in general — Prospect works to a different, more thoughtful, rhythm.”
The Wire / Phineas Rueckert
Pegasus: the new global weapon for silencing journalists
Azerbaijani journalist Khadija “Ismayilova is one of nearly 200 journalists around the world whose phones have been selected as [surveillance] targets by NSO clients, according to the Pegasus Project, an investigation released today by a global consortium of more than 80 journalists from 17 media outlets in 10 countries, coordinated by Forbidden Stories with the technical support of Amnesty International’s Security Lab.”
New York Post / Keith J. Kelly
Keith J. Kelly is retiring from the New York Post after almost 34 years covering media
“I know some of you were expecting a state-of-the-industry address, but we always covered media as a contact sport, with the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat. So I’d prefer to give a snapshot of the most memorable behind-the-scenes moments and the larger-than-life characters I experienced in my 23 years writing the column,” Media Ink.
Press Gazette / William Turvill
Gannett has convinced itself NFTs are a “large opportunity” for newspapers
CEO Mike Reed “said it may create a ‘new way for consumers to enjoy and experience Gannett’s award-winning coverage of historical events, monumental moments and areas of passion or special interests.'”
The Daily Beast / Maxwell Tani and Diana Falzone
Tanzina Vega, host of WNYC’s The Takeaway, leaves the show amid internal tensions
“Vega’s departure is just the latest as WNYC’s internal tensions have spilled into public view. Earlier this year, the station fired longtime On the Media co-host Bob Garfield for violating its anti-bullying policy after repeatedly warning him not to yell at members of his staff (Garfield described his firing at the time as ‘tragic’ and said he was let go for ‘yelling in 5 meetings over 20 years’).”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.