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Triangle Blog Blog aims for a sweet spot between local news and progressive politics
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Triangle Blog Blog aims for a sweet spot between local news and progressive politics
To what extent can, and can’t, a well-researched progressive civics blog serve as local news?
By Sophie Culpepper
Journalism has become ground zero for the vocation crisis
Journalists — like nurses and teachers — want to do work that’s interesting and socially beneficial. But the industry’s increasing precariousness counterbalances the appeal.
By Matthew Powers
Freelancers sue over new rules on independent contractors
“Ultimately, what we’re fighting for is the right to freelance.”
By Christina Couch
Is the news industry ready for another pivot to video?
Aggregate data from 47 countries shows all the growth in platform news use coming from video or video-led networks.
By Nic Newman
Many people don’t pay full price for their news subscription. Most don’t want to pay anything at all
Is increasing subscriber numbers by offering people rock-bottom trial prices sustainable?
By Craig Robertson
What’s in a successful succession? Nonprofit news leaders on handing the reins to the next guard
“Any organization that is dependent on having a founder around is inherently unsustainable.”
By Sophie Culpepper
Worldwide, news publishers face a “platform reset”
Some findings from RISJ’s 2024 Digital News Report.
By Nieman Lab Staff
The strange history of white journalists trying to “become” Black
“To believe that the richness of Black identity can be understood through a temporary costume trivializes the lifelong trauma of racism. It turns the complexity of Black life into a stunt.”
By Alisha Gaines
Business Insider’s owner signed a huge OpenAI deal. ChatGPT still won’t credit the site’s biggest scoops
“We are…deeply worried that despite this partnership, OpenAI may be downplaying rather than elevating our works,” Business Insider’s union wrote in a letter to management.
By Andrew Deck
How Newslaundry worked with its users to make its journalism more accessible
“If you’re doing it, do it properly. Don’t just add a few widgets, or overlay products and embeds, and call yourself accessible.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
How YouTube’s recommendations pull you away from news
Plus: News participation is declining, online and offline; making personal phone calls could help with digital-subscriber churn; and partly automated news videos seem to work with audiences.
By Mark Coddington and Seth Lewis
Apple brings free call recording and transcription to iPhones; journalists rejoice
“There are decades where nothing happens, and there are weeks when decades happen.”
By Joshua Benton
What can The Wall Street Journal’s new ad campaign tell us about its future?
The new brand campaign is aimed at younger versions of existing Journal readers. The various “It’s Your Business” ads center some of the newsroom’s edgier and more evergreen journalism.
By Sarah Scire
“Neither feast nor famine”: In 2023, nonprofit news continued to grow — but the audience picture is more complicated
While the sector is still growing, that growth is slowing, by some metrics. And audience data for 2023 shows that across all outlets surveyed, average monthly web traffic fell.
By Sophie Culpepper
Triangle Blog Blog aims for a sweet spot between local news and progressive politics
To what extent can, and can’t, a well-researched progressive civics blog serve as local news?
By Sophie Culpepper
Journalism has become ground zero for the vocation crisis
Journalists — like nurses and teachers — want to do work that’s interesting and socially beneficial. But the industry’s increasing precariousness counterbalances the appeal.
Freelancers sue over new rules on independent contractors
“Ultimately, what we’re fighting for is the right to freelance.”
What We’re Reading
Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone has a new album rating system. (It’s the old rating system.)
“Turns out, the Hear This/Instant Classic gambit was an instant-classic example of an experiment that didn’t really work. Having only two ratings turned out to be way too limiting. A clear, well-defined system that lets readers know what we think about a record — from the greatest masterpiece to the duddiest dud — worked perfectly well.”
Poynter / Amaris Castillo
L.A. Taco was forced to furlough its staff. Reader support brought them back within 24 hours.
“We understand not everybody can jump on a membership. Not everybody can afford a monthly payment. That’s totally understandable, but even those who donated, those who bought merch, or those who simply shared our membership, we are forever grateful to them.”
The New York Times
One debate. Two candidates. No audience. 60 New York Times reporters.
“The New York Times will livestream the debate, and 60 Times journalists will be on hand Thursday night to offer context, insight, photos, reactions and fact-checking as part of our live coverage beginning around 8 p.m.”
The Guardian / Harry Davies
“The gray zone”: How the IDF views some journalists in Gaza as legitimate targets
“An investigation by the Guardian suggests that amid a loosening of the Israel Defense Force’s interpretation of the laws of war after the deadly Hamas-led attacks on 7 October, some within the IDF appear to have viewed journalists working in Gaza for outlets controlled by or affiliated with Hamas to be legitimate military targets.”
Variety / Todd Spangler
MTV News website goes dark as its archives were pulled offline
“The now-unavailable content includes decades of music journalism comprising thousands of articles and interviews with countless major artists, dating back to the site’s launch in 1996. Perhaps the most significant loss is MTV News’ vast hip-hop-related archives, particularly its weekly “Mixtape Monday” column, which ran for nearly a decade in the 2000s and 2010s and featured interviews, reviews and more with many artists, producers and others early in their careers.”
Rest of World / Adi Renaldi
Indonesia is trying to block LGBTQIA content from the internet
“The new law would apply to social media and other digital platforms, as well as TV networks, with violations — including hosting creators such as Kai Mata — resulting in fines and cancellation of license. The bill, which also places curbs on the broadcast of investigative journalism, is expected to be passed before outgoing president, Joko Widodo, leaves office this year.”
Reuters / Alasdair Pal
WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange set to be freed after pleading guilty to US espionage charge
“WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is due to plead guilty on Wednesday to violating U.S. espionage law, in a deal that will set him free after a 14-year British legal odyssey and allow his return home to Australia. Assange, 52, has agreed to plead guilty to a single criminal count of conspiring to obtain and disclose classified U.S. national defence documents, according to filings in the U.S. District Court for the Northern Mariana Islands.”
WIRED / Makena Kelly
Unwelcome at the debate, RFK Jr.’s star shines on TikTok Live
“The TikTok town halls are not unlike the town halls many candidates participate in along the IRL campaign trail. But instead of answering questions in pizza shops and Veterans halls, they operate more like a giant Zoom call with technical difficulties and all. And unlike televised town halls with news networks, it’s the creators vetting questions and moderating the conversation, instead of journalists.”
Press Gazette / Charlotte Tobitt
UK fact checkers are spending more time on verifying claims made by politicians than on fake AI-generated content
“The fact checks are produced by a full-time team of four journalists partly seconded from elsewhere within PA for the duration of the election. Also chipping in are some of PA’s specialist journalists – for example its health correspondent helping out with checking health-related claims – and head of production Wesley Johnson and his deputy.”
AP News / Dave Collins
A bankruptcy trustee is planning to shut down Alex Jones’ Infowars and liquidate assets
“A U.S. bankruptcy court trustee is planning to shut down conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ Infowars media platform and liquidate its assets to help pay the $1.5 billion in lawsuit judgments Jones owes for repeatedly calling the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting a hoax.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.