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How Finland’s Helsingin Sanomat has built digital success through “diamonds” in the rough
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How Finland’s Helsingin Sanomat has built digital success through “diamonds” in the rough
HS is the only subscription national newspaper in Finland. Here’s how it gets readers to subscribe.
By Hanaa' Tameez
Vox Media has built a visual way to experience podcasts. It’s accessible to deaf audiences — and gorgeous.
The podcast More Than This had a challenge. How could they recreate the emotions, pacing, and atmosphere of their episodes without using any audio?
By Sarah Scire
More mice, fewer breakthroughs: How to avoid bad headlines on stories about health and medical research
“‘Breakthrough’ is the one that leaps out to me because there so rarely is a breakthrough.”
By Denise-Marie Ordway
It’s time to create an alternative path into a journalism career
American journalists look less and less like the country they cover — in terms of race, class, and background. We need to expand the pool of people who can enter the industry, and an idea from K-12 education might help.
By Joshua Benton
The New York Times hopes to hook listeners on audio. Will a new standalone app do the trick?
“You could spend hours a day on our home page and read seemingly everything that our newsroom produces and not come across much of our audio. That has increasingly felt odd to us.”
By Sarah Scire
Lauded “local news co-op” shuts down without warning, leaving its co-owners in the dark
The Devil Strip’s board of directors said on Tuesday that the site had run out of money and needed to raise $75,000 to rehire staff — but didn’t explain how things got so bad in the first place.
By Laura Hazard Owen
“Think of it as a Kickstarter tote bag but much, much better”: Dirt, an entertainment newsletter, is funding itself with NFTs, not subscriptions
“NFTs are the newest form of digital content. Structurally, that fits with Dirt’s scope.”
By Brian Ng
Travel writer Sarah Khan’s next destination is a top editing job in Dubai — and making travel media more inclusive
“At the end of the day travel journalism is service journalism and so you need to do a service to your readers who are very diverse.”
By Hanaa' Tameez
How A/B testing can (and can’t) improve your headline writing
“We found, surprisingly, that no single feature of a headline’s writing style makes much of a difference in forecasting success.”
By Nick Hagar and Nicholas Diakopoulos
Apple is becoming a bigger player in digital advertising, risking antitrust action and its image
Kneecapping Facebook and adtech companies in the name of privacy just happens to have tripled a key part of Apple’s ad business.
By Joshua Benton
Higher ed and public radio are enmeshed. So what happens when the culture wars come?
With higher education at the crossroads of the culture war, public media is vulnerable to growing political interference over its operations.
By Nikki Usher
The view from here: Rethinking what local news can and should be
“Your newsroom should match the community. It’s the easiest thing to say, it’s very difficult to do.”
By Connor Goodwin, ProPublica
How Finland’s Helsingin Sanomat has built digital success through “diamonds” in the rough
HS is the only subscription national newspaper in Finland. Here’s how it gets readers to subscribe.
By Hanaa' Tameez
Vox Media has built a visual way to experience podcasts. It’s accessible to deaf audiences — and gorgeous.
The podcast More Than This had a challenge. How could they recreate the emotions, pacing, and atmosphere of their episodes without using any audio?
More mice, fewer breakthroughs: How to avoid bad headlines on stories about health and medical research
“‘Breakthrough’ is the one that leaps out to me because there so rarely is a breakthrough.”
What We’re Reading
Protocol / Anna Kramer
Twitter’s research shows its algorithms amplify right-leaning political content more than left-leaning
“We can see that it is happening. We are not entirely sure why it is happening.”
New York Press Room
New York magazine is looking for a writer to spend one year eating their way around NYC
“You can apply by sending us a resume, relevant clips, and, in lieu of a traditional cover letter, 800 words describing one recent night out somewhere unforgettable to show us why we must hire you for this frankly insane opportunity.”
HuffPost / Lautaro Grinspan
“This has destroyed my family”: How Spanish-language radio helped radicalize a generation of Miami abuelos
“Misinformation targeting Latinos comes from different sources, from chats on popular messaging platforms like WhatsApp to Facebook pages and Latin American YouTube channels. Many of these platforms translate conspiracy theories that originated in English into Spanish. But when that misinformation — from unsupported claims about election fraud to anti-vaccine propaganda and everything in between — makes the leap onto Miami Spanish-language radio (a space dominated by Cuban Americans, a key Republican constituency in Florida), it receives a mainstream stamp of approval from stations that have, in some cases, been a part of people’s daily routines for decades.”
Washington Post / Bryan Pietsch
Trump plans to launch a social media platform called “Truth Social” as part of a larger “non-woke” media company
“The site was briefly accessible to the public on Wednesday night, allowing people to create accounts and claim usernames. One account under the handle ‘donaldjtrump’ posted a photo of a pig defecating.”
The Guardian / Jim Waterson
The Evening Standard’s top editor will leave after 15 months. She cut 40% of editorial staff during her tenure.
Outgoing editor Emily Sheffield is the sister-in-law of the former U.K. prime minister David Cameron. Although the Standard is a regional paper, “its large print distribution and proximity to power means many politicians in Westminster treat it as a national outlet.”
Bloomberg / William Turton
An “infamous Russian cybergang” has been linked to the Sinclair Broadcasting hack
The cybergang is called “Evil Corp.” (Really.) Sinclair, which owns or operates 185 television stations in 86 markets, was hit with a ransomware attack earlier this week.
Washington Post / Paul Farhi
When local reporters resist vaccination mandates, everyone in town hears about it
“These journalists aren’t much different from other workers who have opposed employee vaccination mandates, whether in health care, law enforcement, education or any other field — except for one thing: They’re among the best-known people in their communities as a result of beaming into homes for years or even decades.”
AP / Lauren Easton
The Associated Press will bring economic, sports, and election facts to blockchain
“Q: What’s the significance of AP news and information being used on the blockchain? A: Trust. The core purpose of a blockchain is to be a publicly accessible, safe and secure record of verified information.” The AP will work with Chainlink for the project.
Bloomberg / Philip Glamann, Zheping Huang, Colum Murphy, and Ishika Mookerjee
China has banned Caixin, one of the few news outlets willing to criticize government officials, from being republished
“The ouster of Caixin — a financial news organization that has reported on official corruption, pollution issues and public anger at the government — means its articles cannot appear on the internet platforms such as Sina.com that are popular ways for the Chinese public to consume news.”
New Statesman / Ian Burrell
The New York Times has expanded its London-based newsroom to 70 journalists, rivaling national U.K. titles
“It is a signal that the ‘Gray Lady’ of American publishing, which has amassed 900,000 overseas subscribers with aggressive marketing, is not content with simply reporting the UK through the distanced perspective of a silver-haired foreign correspondent addressing the folks back home.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.