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June 5, 2014, 12:51 p.m.
Business Models
LINK: www.nytimes.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Caroline O'Donovan   |   June 5, 2014

The Upshot has gone chart crazy today, with a new project featuring 255 visualizations of how job markets were influenced by the recession. In the words of New York Times developer and Upshot team member Derek Willis:

Graphics editors Jeremy Ashkenas and Alicia Parlapiano — who used data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics for this project — found that, although Internet publishing was relatively unscathed, gains there did not make up for the loss of nearly half a million jobs in publishing. (Click through to take advantage of the neat interactive features, obv. The scrolling is a little slow but most of Twitter agrees this “metagraphic” is a feat, even for the Times.)

Digital Revolution, NYT (small)

Interestingly, their findings suggest that, in addition to all print-related industries, radio, TV, and broadcast have also failed to recover from the losses of the recession thus far.

Media, NYT Upshot Recession (small)

Based on the media breakdown, newspaper publishing were second hardest hit salary-wise — dropping around $5,000 — better only than telecom resellers, while software publishing, data processing, and Internet publishing, broadcast, and search (lumped together) were the only three media subsets to experience growth. (The numbers use a rather broad definition of “media” that includes your local Verizon store salesman.)

Publishing and media joins manufacturing, housing, and construction among the industries hardest hit by the recession. Of course, even 255 charts leave some questions unanswered:

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