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Truth Goggles are back! And ready for the next era of fact-checking
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Dec. 9, 2008, 6:43 a.m.

Morning Links: December 9, 2008

— Frédéric Filloux sees flickers of hope for a business model for news. But first:

…before going any further, I want to make sure readers…have fully abandoned all hope for any turnaround whatsoever in newspaper business. Let’s face it: our beloved trade is spiraling down. We’ll see many fatalities and, of course, a few survivors.

— David Sullivan writes a defense of Tony Ridder and a requiem for a better day.

— Adrian Monck wonders if newspapers can grow their way out of their problems by boosting online audience share.

— Mark Luckie has buying hints for those shopping for journalists. In many cases, rent money would also be welcome.

POSTED     Dec. 9, 2008, 6:43 a.m.
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