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Articles by Joshua Benton

Joshua Benton founded Nieman Lab in 2008 and served as its director until 2020; he is now the Lab’s senior writer. Before spending a year at Harvard as a 2008 Nieman Fellow, he spent a decade in newspapers, mostly at The Dallas Morning News. His reports on cheating on standardized tests in the Texas public schools led to the permanent shutdown of a school district and won the Philip Meyer Journalism Award from Investigative Reporters and Editors. He has reported from a dozen foreign countries, been a Pew Fellow in International Journalism, and three times been a finalist for the Livingston Award for International Reporting. Before Dallas, he was a reporter and occasional rock critic for The Toledo Blade. He wrote his first HTML in January 1994.
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Local TV stations have huge audiences on Facebook, but they’ll need new ways to reach younger Americans who associate the app with their parents.
At their best, they talk explicitly about reader trust — how it gets earned and lost. They lay out their standards and where they fell short. They make opaque newsroom processes transparent. And they show their work.
They quote more scientists and cite more peer-reviewed studies, a new study finds. So maybe don’t cut your newsroom’s training budget to the bone?
It wasn’t hard to see this day coming on the day CNN+ was announced. It didn’t take blowing hundreds of millions of dollars to figure it out.
“In instances when content touches on sensitive topics but does not cross the threshold which would require removal under our Platform Rules, we may take steps to restrict and limit its reach.”
“Tweet less, tweet more thoughtfully, and devote more time to reporting,” says executive editor Dean Baquet. Is that a wise redirection of attention or a mistaken view of reporting circa 2022? (Both, a little.)
A new beta version would add significant friction to forwarding messages more than once — the latest in a line of structural changes meant to reduce how often misinformation goes viral.
Its new app, FT Edit, will feature “a curated selection” of eight “deep-dive articles” each weekday morning at a price almost all of its readers can afford. But the ghost of NYT Now looms ominously nearby.
“Corporations continue to control access to materials that are in the library, which is controlling preservation, and it’s killing us.”
A new study of social media about a climate change conference found journalists’ negative tweets gained far more traction with users than positive ones. That’s one of the findings in this new collection of research into climate journalism.