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Articles by Joshua Benton

Joshua Benton founded Nieman Lab in 2008 and served as its director until 2020; he is now the Lab’s senior writer. Before spending a year at Harvard as a 2008 Nieman Fellow, he spent a decade in newspapers, mostly at The Dallas Morning News. His reports on cheating on standardized tests in the Texas public schools led to the permanent shutdown of a school district and won the Philip Meyer Journalism Award from Investigative Reporters and Editors. He has reported from a dozen foreign countries, been a Pew Fellow in International Journalism, and three times been a finalist for the Livingston Award for International Reporting. Before Dallas, he was a reporter and occasional rock critic for The Toledo Blade. He wrote his first HTML in January 1994.
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Kneecapping Facebook and adtech companies in the name of privacy just happens to have tripled a key part of Apple’s ad business.
After announcing Ozy’s closing Friday, Carlos Watson now seems to believe there are still advertisers, investors, and partners who just can’t wait to do it all again.
Does the site’s “signature ahead-of-the-curve coverage” really uncover “the new, the next, rising stars, new trends, that kind of stuff”? Or does it “discover” stars already discovered?
A healthy chunk of Facebook users say they don’t get much news there any more — an outcome to be both expected and desired.
Genius (née Rap Genius) wanted to “annotate the world” and give your content a giant comment section you can’t control. Now it can’t pay back its investors.
But its recommendations to reduce polarization don’t target the people who might have the most direct influence.
Is a defamatory comment left on your Facebook page more like graffiti on a wall, a streaker on live TV, or a hand-delivered telegram? Whatever your metaphor, Australian courts now say publishers are legally liable for words they neither wrote nor published.
Which means they’ll no longer have to give Apple a big cut of the subscription revenue they generate — and publishers can truly own the relationship with their customers.
For the vast majority of news outlets, Apple’s cut of a subscription sold on an iPhone will now drop from 30% to 15%. Will that change any publishers’ minds?