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For COVID-19, as with everything else, Americans on the right and left live in different universes when it comes to trusting the media
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Articles by Joshua Benton

Joshua Benton is director of the Nieman Journalism Lab. Before spending a year at Harvard as a 2008 Nieman Fellow, he spent a decade in newspapers, most recently at The Dallas Morning News. His reports on cheating on standardized tests in the Texas public schools led to the permanent shutdown of a school district and won the Philip Meyer Journalism Award from Investigative Reporters and Editors. He has reported from 10 foreign countries, been a Pew Fellow in International Journalism, and three times been a finalist for the Livingston Award for International Reporting. Before Dallas, he was a reporter and occasional rock critic for The Toledo Blade. He wrote his first HTML in January 1994.
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A new study looks at how people in seven countries view the motives of the news media in covering the pandemic. Only in the United States is that a profoundly partisan question.
Slow news has been pitched as a way to break through the noise and reach audiences exhausted by the daily headlines. But it’s still fast-news junkies who are most attracted to it, this new research finds.
A new paper argues that the “26 words that created the internet” should remain in force — but only for companies that agree to certain new regulations and restrictions.
Apple now won’t kneecap the ad tech industry — for all the good and bad that implies — until early 2021. Publishers should use the extra time to get their data houses in order.
“Many of our interviewees had little direct experience with news, yet they ‘knew’ they could not trust it, or found it boring, or that it was part of a shady system intended to hide important matters from them.”
For more than a decade, handing 30 percent of subscription revenues to the tech giants has just been the cost of doing business. A gaming fight could unlock new ways to pay.