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Solidarity eclipses objectivity as journalism’s dominant ideal
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Articles by Joshua Benton

Joshua Benton founded Nieman Lab in 2008 and served as its director until 2020; he is now the Lab’s senior writer. Before spending a year at Harvard as a 2008 Nieman Fellow, he spent a decade in newspapers, mostly at The Dallas Morning News. His reports on cheating on standardized tests in the Texas public schools led to the permanent shutdown of a school district and won the Philip Meyer Journalism Award from Investigative Reporters and Editors. He has reported from a dozen foreign countries, been a Pew Fellow in International Journalism, and three times been a finalist for the Livingston Award for International Reporting. Before Dallas, he was a reporter and occasional rock critic for The Toledo Blade. He wrote his first HTML in January 1994.
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His replacement, CTO Parag Agrawal, had only tweeted 10 times in 2021 before today.
Do you mean “people who pay a news company hundreds of dollars a year”? Or “email addresses we have in a spreadsheet somewhere”?
This time it’s Lee Enterprises in the cross-hairs. Adding it to its empire would leave two American local newspaper giants — Gannett and Alden — and everyone else far behind.
“Understanding the root problems of information disorder requires understanding hard-wired human behaviors, economic and political policy, group psychology and ideologies, and the relationship to people’s sense of individual and community identity.”
Google “streamlined” its audio news offerings by ending its algorithm-customized briefing. Who’ll figure out the best way for listeners to discover short audio news?
Glance, which partners with manufacturers to come preinstalled on phones, keeps a light news diet only a tap away from its users — all 115 million of them.
Cambridge, Massachusetts — a rich, educated city home to some of the world’s most powerful institutions — is at least for now without its last full-time local newspaper reporter.
“It will be a flash in the pan. Some legislators will get pissy. And then in a few weeks they will move onto something else. Meanwhile we are printing money in the basement, and we are fine.”
American journalists look less and less like the country they cover — in terms of race, class, and background. We need to expand the pool of people who can enter the industry, and an idea from K-12 education might help.
Kneecapping Facebook and adtech companies in the name of privacy just happens to have tripled a key part of Apple’s ad business.