Donate Now       Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
The Christian Science Monitor is betting big on constructive, non-depressing (but paid-for) news
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Jan. 26, 2009, 5:27 p.m.

Last call for Nieman Fellowships

This’ll be my final reminder, as the deadline creeps closer than a B-movie villain, but you’ve got one last chance to apply for a Nieman Fellowship. You may know it by its alternate name, The Sweetest Deal in the Universe: You get to spend an academic year away from your newsroom, studying the subjects of your choice here at Harvard or down the road at MIT. And we pay you to do it — at least $65K, plus more if you’ve got kids. And your husband/wife/significant other gets to come along and take classes, too. Trust me when I tell you that it’s a pretty nice way to spend a year, even if there’s a big slab of winter smack in the middle of it. (That’s our home, Lippmann House, above in less frozen days.)

The deadline for your application to be postmarked is this Saturday. The thing you’d need to move on most quickly is getting your four letters of recommendation, but beyond that there are two short essays, a sampling of your work, and some paperwork. If you start now, there’s still time, but it’s running short. If you’ve got any questions, get in touch with my man John Breen or drop me a line.

POSTED     Jan. 26, 2009, 5:27 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
The Christian Science Monitor is betting big on constructive, non-depressing (but paid-for) news
The 109-year-old publication’s digital future will be based around a voice that is “calm and fact-based and fundamentally constructive, and assumes that our readers are looking to have a fundamentally constructive approach to the news.”
Axios goes live, with a Trump interview (in 19 bullet points and a bunch of little posts)
Who needs a ton of words?
This is The New York Times’ digital path forward
“For all the progress we have made, we still have not built a digital business large enough on its own to support a newsroom that can fulfill our ambitions.” This new internal report outlines how the Times aims to improve its journalism to help do just that.