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Aug. 10, 2009, 9:04 a.m.

Gina Chen and Jim Barnett join the Nieman Journalism Lab

I’m very pleased to announce two new additions to the blogging voices here at the Nieman Journalism Lab. Starting today, you’ll occasionally see the bylines of Gina Chen and Jim Barnett appearing on these pages.

You may know Gina from her blog Save the Media, which we’ve pointed to regularly. She spent 20 years in newspapers, most of them at The Post-Standard in Syracuse, N.Y. and most of them as an editor. She just left newspapers to start a Ph.D. program at Syracuse University.

Jim Barnett has been blogging about nonprofit models for news organizations at The Nonprofit Road. He too spent 20 years in newspapers, the last 10 of them as a Washington correspondent for The Oregonian. He’s currently pursuing an M.P.A. in nonprofit management at George Washington and working as a copy editor at The Los Angeles Times-Washington Post News Service.

Please join me in welcoming them aboard, and I hope you’ll enjoy what they bring to the Lab.

POSTED     Aug. 10, 2009, 9:04 a.m.
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