Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
These national journalists are building a local site to bring a different kind of news to East Texas
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Aug. 26, 2011, 6 p.m.

The NYT launches a Twitter feed for live coverage of breaking news

Creating a separate space for covering big events is a way to avoid flooding the feeds of @nytimes’ 3.6 million followers.

As Hurricane Irene storms its way toward the Eastern seaboard — and as news organizations scramble to cover it — The New York Times has launched @NYTLive, a Times-run account featuring “in-depth Twitter curation of major news stories by New York Times editors.”

In the hour since the feed’s been live, it’s served as a hurricane-tweet clearinghouse, sharing tweets from the Times’ Metro desk, @NYTMetro, as well as — quite interesting from the whole individual-vs.-institutional-brand perspective — Times reporters Thomas Kaplan and Brian Stelter. (The latter, who’s currently in North Carolina covering the storm, also had a link to his Twitter feed featured on the Times’ homepage earlier today.)

The paper’s main account, @NYTimes, has over 3.6 million followers; the brand new @NYTLive has only 2,200. Not at all shabby for an hour-old account, but why wouldn’t the Times use its biggest Twitter megaphone? First, it solves a problem faced by many news organizations, the small and especially the big, that use Twitter to share stories across several topics and coverage areas. By breaking out the breaking news from the everyday news — the you-care-about-it-now from the comparatively evergreen — @NYTLive gives the Times the flexibility to live-tweet big stories without flooding its main account and overwhelming the other stories that are sent out on its feed. You may recall that Andy Carvin recently met some criticism for over-tweeting, the main complaint being that his uber-curation drowns out the other Twitter feeds users follow; to the extent that Andy Carvin is a one-man news organization, he’s dealing with the same problem. Stelter himself used a separate account, @brianstelternyt, to livetweet a tech conference earlier this year, but the account seems to have gone dormant.

@NYTLive is also interesting, though, because it allows the Times to be much more cavalier — in the best sense of the term — about including conversation in its Twitter feed. While @NYTLive still very much lives under the umbrella of the Times, it’s not the outlet’s grand, uber-branded, multi-million-follower-strong feed. (Again, its current follower count: 2,000+.) The fact that it’s a subsidiary account gives @NYTLive more freedom to be experimental and responsive. (“This feed is not active every day,” @NYTLive’s intro text notes. “Follow it as a supplement to @nytimes.”) And it’s also interesting to note, along those lines, that the feed’s tweets so far seem to have been sent from Tweetdeck, a publishing tool that lends itself especially well to conversation and social interaction, rather than to the simple publishing of links, on Twitter. (Tweets posted to @NYTimes, on the other hand, are sent “via The New York Times.”) And @NYTLive tweets (again, so far) seem to be more invested in using hashtags like #irene and #ireneqanda than the Times’ big account is — another indication of conversation.

POSTED     Aug. 26, 2011, 6 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 35,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
These national journalists are building a local site to bring a different kind of news to East Texas
The Tyler Loop fashions itself as a data-savvy, digital alt-weekly for the growing, increasingly diverse city of Tyler.
With its Amazon-inspired pilot project, Panoply used listener feedback to help decide its new shows
“We’re basically asking [listeners]: Are we way off base? Are we a little off base? You tell us before we make a whole season of something drive you away.”
This is how The New York Times is using bots to create more one-to-one experiences with readers
“I’m not worried about this technology driving the humanity out of journalism. I’m really excited about the promise of technology bringing more humanity to journalism.” Also: a Michael Barbaro bot.