Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
What Scribd’s growing pains mean for the future of digital content subscription models
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Oct. 12, 2012, 10 a.m.
lippmann-house-700

International journalists, it’s time to apply for a Nieman Fellowship

The application deadline for non-U.S. journalists is December 1. (Americans have until January 31.)

It’s starting to feel downright autumnal in Cambridge, which means it’s time to start talking about the Nieman Fellowships — our 75-year-old program that brings around 24 journalists to spend an academic year at Harvard studying, researching, and building around a study plan or project of their choice. The fellows are half U.S. citizens and half non-U.S., and the first deadline to approach is for those internationals — December 1. (Americans have until January 31.)

You can read much more about the fellowship on the Nieman Foundation website: the program at a glance, eligibility information, types of fellowships, and maybe most practically, how to apply.

But another way to get a handle on the fellowship is to read the bios of our current class of fellows and see the kind of person we’ve selected in the past. It’s a diverse group, including international fellows from Germany, France, Tunisia, South Korea, China, Spain, Israel, Chile, Canada, South Africa, and Vietnam. (A few of them are international enough that they could be considered a credit to several different nations.) Those bios include a brief summary of how they’re spending their year at Harvard, which will give you some insight to the kinds of ideas we like. (And it’s worth mentioning that it’s not just Harvard: MIT and the rest of Cambridge and Boston are also open to you.)

It’s really a tremendous opportunity; I’ve been able to observe the past five classes of fellows and see what kind of an impact it can have on a journalist’s career and life.

What does applying entail? Again, read the full details, but the basics are a personal statement, a proposed course of study, some samples of your work, and some recommendations.

One note: If you’re a resident of Canada, South Korea, South Africa, or the Philippines, there’s a special application process for you. Click your country’s name on the how-to-apply page to get the details.

And a second note: We’ll have more information about the Nieman-Berkman joint fellowships soon.

And a third note: If you have any questions about the fellowship itself, I’m happy to answer questions. If you have any questions about the application process and requirements, best to reach out to our fellowship administrator John Breen.

POSTED     Oct. 12, 2012, 10 a.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
What Scribd’s growing pains mean for the future of digital content subscription models
It turns out that ebook subscription models don’t work very well when people read too much. So what happens next?
How research (and PowerPoints) became the backbone of National Journal’s membership program
“We no longer look at National Journal simply as a news source, but as a collection of resources, as well as a collection of experts we can turn to on occasion.”
Added value: How Harvard Business Review thinks it can add subscribers while getting more expensive
By creating new products and taking advantage of its extensive archives, HBR’s plan is to both offer more to and ask more of subscribers.
What to read next
2843
tweets
A blow for mobile advertising: The next version of Safari will let users block ads on iPhones and iPads
Think making money on mobile advertising is hard now? Think how much more difficult it will be with a significant share of your audience is blocking all your ads — all with a simple download from the App Store.
1763For news organizations, this was the most important set of Apple announcements in years
A new Flipboard-clone with massive potential reach, R.I.P. Newsstand, and news stories embedded deeper inside iOS — it was a big day for news on iPhones and iPads.
762Newsonomics: 10 numbers that define the news business today
From video to social, from mobile to paywalls — these data points help define where we are in the “future of news” today, like it or not.
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
The Bay Citizen
Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism
Seattle PostGlobe
The Times of London
Storify
Journal Register Co.
Wikipedia
Center for Public Integrity
The Daily
Facebook
The Boston Globe
Publish2