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The newsonomics of MLB’s pioneering mobile experience
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Dec. 21, 2012, 12:37 a.m.

So long, editorials

“They can be a leader in their communities by engaging audiences, moderating forums, holding events and curating round table discussion.”
  • Newspapers will start to taper off writing editorials. They’ll find that they can be a leader in their communities by engaging audiences, moderating forums, holding events and curating round table discussion — while avoiding the pitfall of alienating a significant percentage of their audience by telling people what to think.
  • Traditional media will increasingly look to forge partnerships with nonprofit news operations — and even broaden their direct relationships with nonprofit foundations to help fund specific parts of their journalistic operations.
  • Some smart media company is going to realize that tablets, rigged a specific way, can be the new cable TV box — loaded with news apps and bundled premium content, then leased monthly to subscribers who don’t want to pay hundreds of dollars to buy one.
  • Forget the second-screen experience. 2013 will be about maximizing the third-screen experience.
Mark Katches is the editorial director for the Center for Investigative Reporting, which includes California Watch and The Bay Citizen. Previously, he built and ran investigative teams at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and The Orange County Register.
POSTED     Dec. 21, 2012, 12:37 a.m.
PART OF A SERIES     Predictions for Journalism 2013
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