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Aug. 27, 2013, 2:35 p.m.
LINK: chronicle.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   August 27, 2013

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a Middle West journalism school in possession of open skies must be in want of a drone journalism program. Megan O’Neil at the Chronicle of Higher Education:

Two fledgling programs created to teach journalism students how to use drones in their reporting are applying for permits so they can resume operating unmanned aircraft outdoors, their directors said this week. Both programs received cease-and-desist letters from the Federal Aviation Administration last month.

Matt Waite, of the Drone Journalism Lab at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln’s College of Journalism and Mass Communications, and Scott Pham, of the Missouri Drone Journalism Program at the University of Missouri’s School of Journalism, said on Monday that they were in the early stages of what will probably be a process taking months to obtain a certificate of authorization, or COA. Public agencies, such as police departments, that want to fly drones outdoors are required to apply for the FAA permits.

While they pursue permission to work outdoors, Matt’s thinking about testing drones inside the Nebraska Cornhuskers’ indoor practice facility. which looks kind of awesome.

Update, 6:55 p.m.: Matt rightfully notes that I linked to a photo of the wrong one of Nebraska football’s two indoor practice facilities:

Nieman Lab regrets the error.

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