Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Facebook enters the news desert battle, trying to find enough local news for its Today In feature
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Sept. 29, 2014, 2:52 p.m.
LINK: next.theguardian.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   September 29, 2014

The Guardian has a new setup for its liveblogs that aims to fix some of their eternal problems — chief among them that they’re great for in-the-moment following along, but cryptic and unnavigable after the fact:

Paul Owen, who is responsible for the Guardian’s UK live blogs, said: “Once live blogs have been going for more than an hour or two, it becomes difficult for a new reader to start reading; by that point the live blog has often become rather long and unwieldy.

“For a while we have asked the live bloggers to periodically add bullet-point summaries of key events – say at the beginning of the blog, half way through the day, and when wrapping up. But these only really help if the new reader starts reading the blog soon after a summary has been published.

“So we hope pulling up key events into a clickable list at the top or top left of each live blog will now help readers navigate through a live blog at whatever point they choose to join it. Summaries will remain too, though.”

You can see an example of the new look here. I rather like it; the commenters under that post don’t.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 50,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Facebook enters the news desert battle, trying to find enough local news for its Today In feature
Starting in May, Facebook will also solicit ideas for ways to build community through local news, looking for around 100 participants to receive funding and mentorship.
Is the business model for American national news “Trump plus rolling scandals”? And is that sustainable?
An interview with researcher C.W. Anderson: “You do have to wonder how long we can keep up before people have a nervous breakdown.”
Can our corrections catch up to our mistakes as they spread across social media?
Even the best reporters eventually get something wrong. This experiment tried to use the tools we use to spread our stories to spread our mea culpas.