Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Newsonomics: Will Michael Ferro double down on newspapers or go digital?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Feb. 17, 2016, 11:50 a.m.
Reporting & Production
LINK: money.cnn.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Shan Wang   |   February 17, 2016

Last October the Internet bid a sad farewell to Grantland, the sports and culture website Bill Simmons started for ESPN in 2011. On Wednesday, it learned the name of the new digital venture from Simmons that will attempt to fill the Grantland void: The Ringer.

At the moment, the barebones landing page includes only a newsletter signup, for readers interested in receiving “Ringer updates, riffs from our writers, and the occasional Russell Westbrook GIF.” The trademark filings for The Ringer offer a little window into the breadth of what’s planned for the site: “Downloadable podcasts, webcasts and electronic publications in the fields of entertainment, sports, sports and social commentary, pop culture, movies, music, television, technology, electronics, celebrities, current events, news, politics, lifestyle, and topics of general interest…downloadable mobile applications including for the transmission of audio and video content, messages, and information…”

A full site “will debut sometime this late spring or early summer,” a spokesman told CNNMoney, and will feature sports and culture coverage from a new staff that includes half a dozen former Grantlanders.

The email newsletter-to-website rollout strategy is everywhere: The New York Times is launching a new film and TV recommendation site that helps readers figure out what to (binge)watch, and is starting first with a newsletter, followed by a full website sometime this summer. Crain’s is relying on personalized newsletters as entry points into cities where the Detroit-based publishing company doesn’t currently run a dedicated magazine, newspaper, or website.

Simmons, who still bristles over the nature of his breakup with ESPN, is doing just fine for himself, with an aptly named BSPN podcast network already launched (and apparently flourishing) and a deal with HBO that includes a weekly show for the network.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 45,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Newsonomics: Will Michael Ferro double down on newspapers or go digital?
Does he really want to take on becoming the great consolidator of the American press, conquering once-mighty Gannett? Or will he exit the field — richer, but his ambitions humbled?
With audience engagement and live events, Finimize is finding new ways to boost readers’ financial literacy
“Publications like the Financial Times and Wall Street Journal assume a lot of things about what their readers know. If the price of oil goes up, what happens to the dollar? They assume you know that. We assume our readers don’t.”
With a year of guides to a better life, The New York Times hopes to convert more readers to subscribers
“This is all about how we can provide subscribers with the type of content that makes them feel like they’re getting insight they’re not getting anywhere else.” It’s also a bet on keeping some content subscriber-only, not subject to its five-articles-a-month metered paywall.