Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
For news nonprofits, the tax overhaul is bringing new uncertainty about future donations
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Feb. 16, 2016, 11:21 a.m.
LINK: www.statnews.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   February 16, 2016

At the end of 2015, Stat’s global health reporter (and former Nieman Fellow) Helen Branswell named Zika as a global health story to watch. At the time, the mosquito-borne virus wasn’t yet grabbing headlines in the United States. Beginning in January, though, the topic began to rise and trend on Google and social media.

Stat’s reporting on the virus has been “ahead of the curve,” Stat executive editor Rick Berke told me Tuesday. Stat, the health, life sciences, and medical news site launched in partnership with The Boston Globe in November, has already sent reporters to Colombia, Haiti, and Brazil to cover Zika and is now placing correspondents in other regions.

While Zika is obviously only a piece of what Stat covers, Berke, the former New York Times and Politico editor, said the issue is critical to the site’s mission. “It’s a major public health concern. We want to make it accessible to a wide international audience, and already, a quarter of our readers are international,” he said. (Many of those international readers are from the U.K. and Canada, but China, Japan, and Singapore are also significant.) “We see an obligation to break stories on this and go deep, doing it in context and in a sober-minded, but accessible, way.” Stat’s explainers and multimedia efforts around Zika have been especially popular with readers.

A couple of weeks ago, Stat launched a running news tracker called “Zika in 30 seconds,” and this week it began offering up those updates as daily emails.

Stat already has a daily email update called Morning Rounds; this is its first additional “added-value signup,” according to Berke.

“We’ll keep it going as long as there’s interest and as long as we feel the story’s important,” he said. “What’s fun about a startup is that we can experiment and change course whenever we want, and try new things.”

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 45,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
For news nonprofits, the tax overhaul is bringing new uncertainty about future donations
“For us, it’s rare that someone cites the tax deductibility as a reason for giving. People are supporting us because they’re passionate about what we’re doing. People want to be a part of the community thats supporting us.”
Who needs video? Slate is pivoting to audio, and making real money doing it
Plus: WBEZ tries to turn a podcast into a franchise, Science Friday joins WNYC Studios, and Gimlet opens up the HBO playbook.
If Facebook stops putting news in front of readers, will readers bother to go looking for it?
The idea that the value of a piece of news is defined by likes and comments — that taking in information without getting into a back-and-forth with your uncle about it is somehow unworthy — is actually a profoundly ideological statement.