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If you’re poor in the UK you get less, worse news — especially online, new research suggests
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Sept. 17, 2018, 11:33 a.m.
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LINK: www.vulture.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   September 17, 2018

The best house, in my opinion, is a house where books are everywhere: not just on a single shelf in the living room, but on kitchen counters, in bathroom vanities, in bedside table stacks, in baskets on the floor, in backpacks and shopping bags. The same concept can be extended to the digital world. Why should books be siloed off on one section of a website, in a vertical, when you can think of them as a “horizontal” — putting them everywhere, threading them through everything you do?

That’s what New York Media has decided to do with its books coverage. It’s named Boris Kachka as its books editor, and he’ll be in charge of tripling book coverage across New York Media properties — the print magazine, Vulture, The Cut, Daily Intelligencer, The Strategist, and Grub Street. The expansion kicks off this week with a “a premature attempt at the 21st century canon,” on Vulture.

Vulture will also have more coverage of audiobooks, genre (like YA and horror), and new releases; it already runs a real-life monthly book club at The Strand. The Cut will run more book excerpts and author profiles, as well as a series called “Yesterday’s Women,” in which essayists will write about overlooked women writers. Daily Intelligencer will run weekly Q&As with authors of important nonfiction books. The Strategist will run (and link to) best-of lists, and Grub Street will publish new cookbook roundups and excerpts from chef and restaurant memoirs.

“We haven’t really had someone overseeing books and it fell between the cracks too often,” Kachka said. “Books aren’t like a lot of other media; there’s the opportunity to seed them through lots of different sections,” all being overseen under one person. (The New York Times, last year, similarly consolidated its books team under one desk.)

“Books have for years been pretty big areas of interest in our universe and on the site, according to all the metrics we have,” said New York Magazine editor-in-chief Adam Moss. “We thought this was an area we could do a great deal more in, and now we are.”

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