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Key links:
Primary website:
byliner.com
Primary Twitter:
@thebyliner

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

Byliner is a publishing start-up that publishes narrative nonfiction e-books and showcases long-form journalism.

Founded in summer 2011 by John Tayman, Byliner has billed itself as a way for long-form journalism to get the attention it deserves. It typically publishes stories longer than typical magazine pieces but shorter than books.

Its publishing arm, Byliner Originals, inked a deal with the New York Times to publish a dozen e-books from its content in 2013, and has also partnered with New York Magazine to publish New York Magazine’s Most Popular.

In 2014, Byliner told its contributors it was struggling financially and was looking to sell.

The Byliner site organizes other works of long-form journalism by author and includes the headlines, source, and first 300 words of the articles it links to, though it has been scrutinized for allowing readers to largely bypass the ads around the original articles.

Recent Nieman Lab coverage:
Oct. 16, 2017 / Laura Hazard Owen
Not a revolution (yet): Data journalism hasn’t changed that much in 4 years, a new paper finds — When you hear the words “data journalism,” you also often hear words like “revolution” and “future.” But — according to a new paper that looks at a couple hundred international data journalism projects ...
Oct. 16, 2017 / Binoy Prabhakar
One of India’s most famous newspapermen is turning to digital with a political journalism platform — In 2014, when Shekhar Gupta stepped down as CEO and editor-in-chief of The Indian Express, speculation swirled around his next move. Gupta is one of India’s most famous journalists, arguably the last of a tribe of cele...
Oct. 13, 2017 / Joshua Benton
The New York Times released new staff social media guidelines, so phew, thankfully that’s settled — Last night, in an event at George Washington University, New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet talked about his frustration with the social media profiles of some of the Times’ reporters and editors: “I’v...
Oct. 13, 2017 / Laura Hazard Owen
Even smart people are shockingly bad at analyzing sources online. This might be an actual solution. — Many smart people are still very bad at evaluating sources. Stanford’s Sam Wineburg and Sarah McGrew observed “10 Ph.D. historians, 10 professional fact checkers, and 25 Stanford University undergraduatesR...
Oct. 13, 2017 / Shan Wang
As news organizations around the world struggle with advertising, more are prioritizing the individual reader — Journalism is going through a moment of self-reckoning. News organizations around the world are trying to repair or improve readers’ perceptions of their work, while also trying to figure out how to make real money...

Recently around the web, from Mediagazer:

Primary author: Sarah Darville. Main text last updated: June 12, 2014.
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WyoFile is a nonprofit news site that covers public-interest news in Wyoming. The site was founded in 2008 and is funded by grants and donations, led by a Community Information Challenge grant from the Knight Foundation. As of January 2010, the site had raised about $250,000. It had a budget of about $250,000 in 2012,…

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