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Primary website:
cpb.org
Primary Twitter:
@CPBmediaroom

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting is an organization that distributes the federal government’s money to public media organizations.

Founded in 1967, CPB is the main funding source for more than 1,000 public radio and television stations. Its funding supports well-known PBS, NPR, and PRI shows, including PBS NewsHour, Frontline, All Things Considered, and Marketplace.

CPB is also a funding source for future-of-journalism experiments and collaborative projects, like NPR’s Project Argo, which received $2 million from CPB, and Localore, a series of local multimedia projects that received $1.25 million from CPB. NPR’s Code Switch and a number of multi-station Local Journalism Centers have also been funded by CPB.

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Primary author: Sarah Darville. Main text last updated: July 12, 2015.
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The Globe and Mail is a Canadian national newspaper based in Toronto. The Globe and Mail is Canada’s second-largest newspaper by print circulation. Its roots trace back to the founding of the Globe in 1844, and its current majority owner is The Woodbridge Co., a private Canadian media holding company that also holds a majority share…

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The Nieman Journalism Lab is a collaborative attempt to figure out how quality journalism can survive and thrive in the Internet age.
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