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Welcome to GDPR: Here are the data privacy notices publishers are showing their Europe-based readers
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Welcome to GDPR: Here are the data privacy notices publishers are showing their Europe-based readers
We’re seeing what publishers have decided to implement on their websites as of May 25 — whether they’ve decided to block European Union and European Economic Area-based traffic outright, set up buckets of consent for readers to click through, or done something simpler (or nothing new at all).
By Shan Wang and Christine Schmidt
What is it that journalism studies is studying these days? A lot about newsrooms, less about everybody else in the news ecosystem
Also, has the “fake news” moment already passed for academics?
By Rasmus Kleis Nielsen
Is your fake news about immigrants or politicians? It all depends on where you live
Plus: Facebook is accepting proposals for fake news research, and fake news was growing as a topic of media discussion even before the U.S. presidential election.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Media change deniers: Why debates around news need a better evidence base — and how we can get one
“If we let media change deniers drive the conversation, the result will be dumber journalism, less-informed public debate, and ineffective and counterproductive public policy. Even if what they say sometimes ‘feels right.'”
By Rasmus Kleis Nielsen
Who’s creating the top Facebook videos? “Not people you’ve necessarily heard of”
Babies and puppies continue to rule the day, and only 2% of the most engaged Facebook videos were posted by traditional publishers.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Vox’s new Netflix series is really good, but it doesn’t get us any closer to figuring out what news on streaming platforms looks like
The real revolution in video news will be when someone, someday, figures out a way to make timely, high-quality, democratically useful news work natively on a streaming platform.
By Joshua Benton
From Bible study to Google: How some Christian conservatives fact-check the news and end up confirming their existing beliefs
“I think that when people go to Google, they think about Google weighing facts instead of ranking results.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
After crowdfunding success, Swiss magazine Republik charts a course to “reclaim journalism as a profession”
“We believe people don’t pay for articles anymore. They pay to be part of the community.”
By Christine Schmidt
“We have built the world that they told us existed”: Did the rise of young, white “Internet reporting” bolster the alt-right?
“Nothing has been better for alt-right trolling (whatever that word even means) than establishment journalism.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Flush with spectrum-sale dollars, a Pennsylvania PBS station is doubling down on a different kind of local news
“Our goal is a newscast that is complementary to the commercial news”: Think important local issues, not car crashes and sports scores.
By Christine Schmidt
Can signing a “pro-truth pledge” actually change people’s behavior online?
Plus: Fake audio on WhatsApp in India, and do paywalls lead to increased polarization?
By Laura Hazard Owen
What a 2004 experiment in hyperlocal news can tell us about community voices today
Can a community news platform serve as “technology that protects our minds and replenishes society”?
By Amedeo Tumolillo and Rich Gordon
Welcome to GDPR: Here are the data privacy notices publishers are showing their Europe-based readers
We’re seeing what publishers have decided to implement on their websites as of May 25 — whether they’ve decided to block European Union and European Economic Area-based traffic outright, set up buckets of consent for readers to click through, or done something simpler (or nothing new at all).
By Shan Wang and Christine Schmidt
Is your fake news about immigrants or politicians? It all depends on where you live
Plus: Facebook is accepting proposals for fake news research, and fake news was growing as a topic of media discussion even before the U.S. presidential election.
What We’re Reading
CNN Money / Michael Kaplan
Facebook and Google are already facing lawsuits under GDPR
“There is no grace period,” James Dipple-Johnstone, the deputy commissioner of the UK’s data protection authority. “We will be looking at the algorithms they use to profit off data to make sure they are fair,” he added.
Poynter / David Beard
The New York Times’ Showtime series shows how the journalism sausage is made
“Director Garbus effectively creates a screen within a screen for the tweets that drive the news — and frequently cuts to the CNN broadcasts of Times scoops to a broader world. Like director Alan Pakula in ‘Presidents,’ Garbus also showcases juxtapositions, beginning the first episode with newsroom reactions during Trump’s ‘American Carnage’ inauguration speech. She ends the episode with one of the strangest juxtapositions ever, Trump at the Easter Egg Hunt while reporters finish a story that settles on the most contentious word of this administration: collusion.”
Lenfest Institute / Joseph Lichterman
How local publisher Whereby.Us is building an email newsletter referral program
“We knew that so much of our growth was happening just by word of mouth and we wanted to find a way to systematize that process, but creating a referral program is a really big tech lift.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Jared Schroeder
Are bots entitled to free speech?
“All of this requires us to identify what is human about journalism — and what is fundamental about it. Could a bot programmer invoke a journalistic shield law to protect her program’s code, including the sources it used to construct a report, from compelled disclosure? If a bot files FOIA requests, should it be exempt from fees because it intends to scrape the data and publish it in tweets or on a blog?”
Media Nation / Dan Kennedy
The Boston Globe announces another round of downsizing
“We are optimistic that the buyout, the first in two years, will result in the savings we need to create a sustainable Globe. If we do not get enough takers, we’ll have to consider all other options, including layoffs.”
Digiday / Lucia Moses
Some publishers stop Facebook ad spending over policy that treats publishers as political advertisers
At least two publishers — The Financial Times and New York Media — have suspended their paid media spending on Facebook out of fear that their news articles will be treated as political advocacy ads. Facebook “executives have said Facebook recognizes that news about politics is different and was committed to finding a way to distinguish news from non-news content in the archives, but didn’t give specifics or a timeline.”
Poynter / Alexios Mantazarlis
Four serious questions about Elon Musk’s silly credibility score
“The vision that one easy hack can fix media bias and massive online misinformation is pervasive among certain quarters. But it’s fatally flawed.”
Medium / Karen Rundlet
Who is watching local TV news? New research provides some surprises
“New Knight research published today shows that the TV audience is largely 55+ years and shrinking, albeit slowly, as more Americans get their news from social media and smartphones.”
The Coral Project
The Coral Project, after being “incubated” by Mozilla, is looking for a new home
“Over the coming year, we will be offering hosting options for our open-source software, and also looking for a new home for The Coral Project — either as a standalone organization or by partnering with an existing nonprofit or for-profit organization in a related sector.”
ProPublica
ProPublica launches a short-term email newsletter on blood splatter analysis
“Think of this material as being similar to episodes of a podcast. These stories will give you insight into [Pamela] Colloff’s investigation, her reporting process and how she pieced together the narrative.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.