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A new proposed law would turn drone journalism into a swarm of lawsuits and make it easy to sue over news photography
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A new proposed law would turn drone journalism into a swarm of lawsuits and make it easy to sue over news photography
Imagine if a news photographer at a football game had to get permission from every single person in the stadium before taking a single shot — or else face hundreds of civil lawsuits. That’s what new model legislation wants to bring to public airspace.
By Judd Slivka
Three multi-billion-dollar companies dominate the Chinese internet landscape, from news media to AI
Plus: WeChat now has 1.04 billion monthly active users, shortform video is booming, and a few other significant numbers out of a recent report on the state of the Chinese internet landscape.
By Shan Wang
Facebook might downrank the most vile conspiracy theories. But it won’t take them down.
Plus: (Some) researchers can now get access to (some) Facebook data, WhatsApp is funding misinformation research too, and susceptibility to fake news may have more to do with laziness than partisanship.
By Laura Hazard Owen
In Alabama, a small-town paper is figuring out digital advertising — and they’re doing it live
A bet on live video, a busy news year, and maximizing staff talents let the Alexander City Outlook increase its digital ad revenue 80 percent in a year’s time.
By Marlee Baldridge
What kind of information — not just content — do you need as a news consumer?
Pulse, a project launched by Sarah Alvarez and Andrew Haeg, aims to help news organizations text their communities to find out.
By Christine Schmidt
Several people are typing: The good, the bad, and the mansplaining of WikiTribune
“‘Leadership structure’ isn’t a very Wiki phrase.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
54 newsrooms, 9 countries, and 9 core ideas: Here’s what two researchers found in a yearlong quest for journalism innovation
“Our angle on the current state of journalism is this: The crisis of journalism and legacy news media is structural, and not just a matter of technological challenges or broken business models.”
By Per Westergaard and Søren Schultz Jørgensen
The promises and pitfalls of reporting within chat apps and other semi-open platforms: A journalist’s guide
News organizations’ audiences are increasingly moving from public social media to closed or semi-closed platforms like WhatsApp, Discord, and Facebook Groups. But there are still opportunities for good reporting on the communities we cover.
By Mark Frankel
The Washington Post wants to figure out the best places to put ads in your favorite podcasts
Plus: Crooked Media goes audio doc, Maximum Fun goes scripted fiction, and The Pub goes the way of all flesh.
By Nicholas Quah
More than 11,000 people are paying (yes, paying) for email newsletters on Substack’s platform
On average, they’re paying just under $80 per year. About 40 or so indie publishers with paid offerings are making what Substack calls “meaningful money.”
By Shan Wang
A couch to crash on: PressPad aims to tackle one small part of journalism’s class diversity problem
It’s a longstanding quandary for aspiring journalists: How can I get housing in the big city for just a few weeks, while I’m paid nothing or close to it? PressPad wants current journalists to help out the next generation.
By Marlee Baldridge
A new proposed law would turn drone journalism into a swarm of lawsuits and make it easy to sue over news photography
Imagine if a news photographer at a football game had to get permission from every single person in the stadium before taking a single shot — or else face hundreds of civil lawsuits. That’s what new model legislation wants to bring to public airspace.
By Judd Slivka
Three multi-billion-dollar companies dominate the Chinese internet landscape, from news media to AI
Plus: WeChat now has 1.04 billion monthly active users, shortform video is booming, and a few other significant numbers out of a recent report on the state of the Chinese internet landscape.
Facebook might downrank the most vile conspiracy theories. But it won’t take them down.
Plus: (Some) researchers can now get access to (some) Facebook data, WhatsApp is funding misinformation research too, and susceptibility to fake news may have more to do with laziness than partisanship.
What We’re Reading
Digiday / Jessica Davies
Layered consent? Legitimate interest? A guide to speaking fluent GDPR
“Here’s a refresher on the most common terms you can throw around to establish your GDPR street cred.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Justin Ray
In Vermont, an unlikely ombudsman spurs review of domestic violence coverage
“In the future, all Times Argus stories involving a loss of life will pass through additional editors, says Mitchell. The paper will also develop a checklist for reporting on domestic violence incidents. Finally, Mitchell says the paper is reconsidering its standards for stories in other beats to see if there is room for improvement.”
The Splice Newsroom / Victoria Milko
India’s fight against fake news has a problem: Fact-checking needs to reach the regional languages
Fake news in India isn’t going unchallenged. But fact-checking operations often produce most of their content in English — a language only spoken by about 10 percent of India’s population. Some websites have also set up dedicated Hindi pages, extending their fact-checking news to the more than 60 percent of the population. But even with these efforts, 20 other official languages are still be excluded, which these sites don’t have resources to tackle.
Poynter / Taylor Blatchford
The “jobs before journalism” threads revealed the importance of skills that come from outside of a newsroom
“These jobs are more than bullets at the end of a resume, though — there’s a lot to learn from taking a non-journalism summer job instead of, or in addition to, an internship, which is a financial necessity for many.”
CNN Money / Tom Kludt and Oliver Darcy
The last vestiges of Gawker.com have been sold to Bryan Goldberg, the founder of Bustle and co-founder of Bleacher Report
“You are probably wondering what happens next. The short is this — not much. We have no immediate plans to re-launch Gawker. For now, things will stay as they are. I’m very excited about the possibilities for the future of Gawker. I will share more in the months ahead.”
CNBC / Christine Wang
The Department of Justice surprise-appeals the Time Warner and AT&T merger
“Since announcing its bid in October 2016, AT&T has maintained that buying Time Warner would help the company compete against tech companies like Amazon and Netflix. AT&T, the No. 2 wireless carrier in the U.S., said the deal would help the company attract customers by bundling entertainment with mobile service.”
Financial Times / Emily Feng
How Chinese state media spreads its message around the globe — via 200 “independent” publications
“A Financial Times investigation found that party-affiliated outlets were reprinting or broadcasting their content in at least 200 nominally independent Chinese-language publications around the world. Under such agreements, these publications now reach millions of readers outside China each year, rivalling the subscription pools for all of the world’s largest newspapers.”
Wired / Emily Dreyfuss
Judd Legum is leaving ThinkProgress to launch a one-man, paid political newsletter
“Popular Information will be free for everyone for the first six to eight weeks in order to gain an audience; after that, the Monday edition will be free, and the other three days accessible only to paying members.”
Medium / Freia Nahser
Hi Alexa! Is the monetization conversation moot?
“Social media had a disruptive effect on our business models, on our relationships with our audiences, and on society and democracy. It’s worth thinking about this technology in an expansive way: on the one hand it’s exciting and the barriers to entry are low, but it’s also worth being deeply aware of the quite rapid pace that it might pick up.”
Fast Company / Aileen Kwun
Michael Bierut on how to reinvent a legacy magazine brand
“Designers are like doctors: You’re an authority, and people are trusting you to make them well. But in able to understand how to remedy them, you have to be very empathetic and have good bedside manner in order to diagnose the problem.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.