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Who’s who in local news: A guide to the biggest brains and bank accounts in the fight for local journalism
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Who’s who in local news: A guide to the biggest brains and bank accounts in the fight for local journalism
Local news consortiums, labs, associations, and more.
By Christine Schmidt
Newsonomics: Still another Tronc drama, as John Lynch re-enters the business
As much of Tronc’s turbulence looks to be clearing, new questions are emerging about who will next lead the big metro chain.
By Ken Doctor
How do HomePod’s meh sales affect Apple’s place in the podcast ecosystem?
Plus: Atlanta Monster racks up downloads, Google wants to double the podcast market, and Caliphate is absolutely amazing.
By Nicholas Quah
Wellness apps, but for news: Can Neva Labs build a news reading experience that feels healthy?
“If you took away advertising from the platforms we have currently, if you took away the need to addict people and harvest their data and keep them refreshing their pages, what would that experience look like?”
By Shan Wang
Saying “I can just Google it” and then actually Googling it are two different things
Plus other findings from a new study’s interviews with that increasingly common creature, the “news avoider.”
By Christine Schmidt
Combine an “editorially responsible” algorithm + political news, and you have Current Status
“I see my role as a sort of reinforcement editor, ensuring that the good stuff is always percolating to the top. Sometimes the news isn’t as neat as an algorithm wants to make it.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Can Facebook beat back the fake news in Ireland’s upcoming vote on abortion?
Plus: What people who like fact-checking are like, a new “digital deception” newsletter, and Facebook expands its fact-checking partnerships beyond the West.
By Laura Hazard Owen
R Vision, a digital news outlet by and for Rohingya people, aims to shed light on crisis
R Vision is run entirely by an ethnic Rohingya staff of about 25 and uses local citizen journalists to get news out from areas where media is denied access.
By James Rose
Should you design for addiction or for loyalty?
That depends on whether you want users or an audience.
By Michelle Manafy
From Nieman Reports: Reinventing local TV news might require going over the top
To attract young viewers, stations are going digital-first, crowdsourcing reporting, experimenting with augmented reality, and injecting more personality into the news.
By Eryn Carlson and Sara Morrison
Who’s who in local news: A guide to the biggest brains and bank accounts in the fight for local journalism
Local news consortiums, labs, associations, and more.
By Christine Schmidt
Newsonomics: Still another Tronc drama, as John Lynch re-enters the business
As much of Tronc’s turbulence looks to be clearing, new questions are emerging about who will next lead the big metro chain.
How do HomePod’s meh sales affect Apple’s place in the podcast ecosystem?
Plus: Atlanta Monster racks up downloads, Google wants to double the podcast market, and Caliphate is absolutely amazing.
What We’re Reading
TechCrunch / Frederic Lardinois
Say hello to the new Gmail with self-destructing messages, email snoozing and more
“The other major new feature in this update is “confidential mode.” The idea here is simple: When you write an email, you can select for how long the recipient will be able to read the email. Recipients will not be able to forward, copy and paste, download or print the content. You can’t stop anybody from taking a picture of the screen of course, but what’s maybe more important here is that if anybody ever hacked the recipient’s account, that email with your confidential information will be long gone.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Ricardo Gandour
As election looms, Brazil braces for fake news
How Brazil is preparing for misinformation in its election.
Reporters Without Borders
U.S. falls to #45 in Reporters Without Borders’ World Press Freedom Index (from #43)
“The climate of hatred is steadily more visible in the Index, which evaluates the level of press freedom in 180 countries each year. Hostility towards the media from political leaders is no longer limited to authoritarian countries such as Turkey (down two at 157th) and Egypt (161st), where “media-phobia” is now so pronounced that journalists are routinely accused of terrorism and all those who don’t offer loyalty are arbitrarily imprisoned. More and more democratically-elected leaders no longer see the media as part of democracy’s essential underpinning, but as an adversary to which they openly display their aversion.”
TechCrunch / Ingrid Lunden
Travel writing site Culture Trip, which uses a contributor model, raises $80M
“The startup works with some 300 paid contributors globally, who write light stories, take pictures and make videos on everything under the bigger umbrella of local culture, just no politics and current affairs…There have been some 75,000 articles published since 2011, with the rate currently at 3,000 articles per month.”
The Chronicle of Higher Education / Dan Bauman and Chris Quintana
Drew Cloud, a student loans expert quoted in papers like the Boston Globe and Washington Post, is not a real person
“After The Chronicle spent more than a week trying to verify Cloud’s existence, the company that owns The Student Loan Report confirmed that Cloud was fake. ‘Drew Cloud is a pseudonym that a diverse group of authors at Student Loan Report, LLC use to share experiences and information related to the challenges college students face with funding their education,’ wrote Nate Matherson, CEO of LendEDU. Before that admission, however, Cloud had corresponded at length with many journalists, pitching them stories and offering email interviews, many of which were published. When The Chronicle attempted to contact him through the address last week, Cloud said he was traveling and had limited access to his account. He didn’t respond to additional inquiries.”
Digiday / Lucia Moses
After years of chasing Facebook traffic, Mic goes for “deliberate distribution”
“Before, we would have said to a platform, ‘What do we need to do?’ Now, we’ll experiment, but less so.”
the Guardian / Mark Sweney
Guardian on track to break even as company halves its losses
“Guardian News & Media reported a £19m loss in the year to the end of March, in the previous financial year. The publisher, which is now in the final year of a three-year plan to break even, has cut losses to a third of the £57m reported when the drive to reshape the business began.”
Wall Street Journal / Jonathan Randles
Peter Thiel agrees not to buy Gawker
“Mr. Thiel has agreed to withdraw from the sale process and to provide the eventual buyer a legal release for articles in the Gawker archive.”
The New York Times / Daisuke Wakabayashi and Adam Satariano
Will looming privacy regulations only strengthen Google and Facebook?
Europe’s GDPR laws, which “require tech companies to ask for users’ consent for their data, are likely to hand Google and Facebook an advantage. That’s because wary consumers are more prone to trust recognized names with their information than unfamiliar newcomers. And the laws may deter start-ups that do not have the resources to comply with the rules from competing with the big companies.”
Business Insider
Bloomberg is planning to launch a paywall
“Bloomberg is finalizing plans to roll out a paid subscription offering for its Bloomberg.com property, according to people familiar with the matter. The paywall is set to roll out in May, according to the people, though the launch date could change. The launch of the paywall is set to coincide with a relaunch of the Bloomberg.com website, according to the people.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.