Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Consumers love smart speakers. They don’t love news on smart speakers. (At least not yet.)
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Consumers love smart speakers. They don’t love news on smart speakers. (At least not yet.)
People are still much more likely to use smart speakers for music and weather than news. But that could change as news organizations design news briefings specifically for the speakers.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Newsonomics: Can The Correspondent “unbreak news” in the United States?
Ad-free, member-funded, and Dutch: The team behind the breakout success De Correspondent is translating its ideas into English (and Judd Apatow is on board).
By Ken Doctor
25 newsrooms have attempted to bridge divisions — in person. Here’s what they’ve learned
“Whenever you have an individual interaction, a lot of the bluster, a lot of the generalizations, a lot of the group identifications fall away,” one participant in Pennsylvania said.
By Christine Schmidt
So some people will pay for a subscription to a news site. How about two? Three?
New York magazine and Quartz both now want readers to pay up. How deep into their pockets will even dedicated news consumers go for a second (or third or fourth) read?
By Joshua Benton
Pandora wants to map the “podcast genome” so it can recommend your next favorite show
Plus: SNL pokes fun, Conan O’Brien tackles a new medium, and why we need more podcast transcripts.
By Nicholas Quah
The New York Times is digitizing more than 5 million photos dating back to the 1800s
“Ultimately, this digitalization will equip Times journalists with useful tools to make it easier to tell even more visual stories.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Facebook Groups are “the greatest short-term threat to election news and information integrity”
Plus: How “junk news” differs from “fake news,” and LinkedIn gets less boring (but not in a good way).
By Laura Hazard Owen
This Spanish data-driven news site thinks its work goes past publishing stories — to lobbying the government and writing laws
“You feel all this knowledge would be useful for something, for trying to change something.”
By Christine Schmidt
Why are some women “news avoiders”? New research suggests one reason has to do with emotional labor
“News avoidance appeared to be a strategic choice to conserve both emotional energy and time, in order to better fulfill demanding responsibilities, especially caretaking.””
By Laura Hazard Owen
In cities across America, this morning’s newspaper told you there was an election yesterday — but nothing about it
To save money on newsprint and late press runs, Gannett told its newspapers not to bother printing results and to direct the curious online. Here’s how that played out.
By Joshua Benton
Can this network of lit-to-be-local newsletters unlock younger civic engagement?
6AM runs six sites in four states across the Southeast, in areas “where they are not big enough to have multiple daily papers, yet they are big enough to have a huge life force and a huge heart.”
By Christine Schmidt
YouTube helps a majority of American users understand current events — but 64 percent say they see untrue info
When a one-hour outage on the platform can result in a 20 percent net hike in traffic to publishers’ websites, YouTube’s got a special share of the attention economy.
By Christine Schmidt
Consumers love smart speakers. They don’t love news on smart speakers. (At least not yet.)
People are still much more likely to use smart speakers for music and weather than news. But that could change as news organizations design news briefings specifically for the speakers.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Newsonomics: Can The Correspondent “unbreak news” in the United States?
Ad-free, member-funded, and Dutch: The team behind the breakout success De Correspondent is translating its ideas into English (and Judd Apatow is on board).
25 newsrooms have attempted to bridge divisions — in person. Here’s what they’ve learned
“Whenever you have an individual interaction, a lot of the bluster, a lot of the generalizations, a lot of the group identifications fall away,” one participant in Pennsylvania said.
What We’re Reading
CNN Business / Brian Stelter and David Shortell
The Department of Justice argues the White House can choose which journalists get its permanent press passes
“‘The President and White House possess the same broad discretion to regulate access to the White House for journalists (and other members of the public) that they possess to select which journalists receive interviews, or which journalists they acknowledge at press conferences,’ lawyers say in the filing…. Judge Timothy J. Kelly, a Trump appointee, has scheduled a hearing for Wednesday at 3:30 p.m.”
Variety / Brian Steinberg
Fox News signs onto CNN’s White House lawsuit
“In 2009, CNN supported Fox News’ right to take part in a White House event during the Obama administration. Earlier this year, Fox News anchor Bret Baier stood up when CNN correspondent Kaitlan Collins was excluded by the Trump White House from an event taking place at the Rose Garden.”
Axios / Sara Fischer
LinkedIn expects its media business to bring in $2 billion (thanks to ad revenue) by the end of this fiscal year
“LinkedIn has been hesitant to reveal specific revenue numbers around its media efforts since it was acquired by Microsoft in 2016, but is doing so now to highlight the growth of its ad business, which can be in part attributed to user engagement.”
Digiday / Tim Peterson
Facebook is having a hard time breaking into TV — not only with Facebook Watch
“Two years after Facebook extended its Audience Network ad network to the connected-TV market, Facebook is shutting down the connected-TV side of its ad network and will stop selling ads inside publishers’ OTT apps by January 2019…. In the last month, publishers using Audience Network began to notice that Facebook had stopped filling their OTT apps’ inventory.”
BBC Africa Eye / Yemisi Adegoke
Facebook’s fact-checking partners in Africa have just four workers in Nigeria, where 24M use the platform monthly
“In the US, Asia, and Europe, Facebook has come under intense scrutiny for its role in the circulation of ‘fake news’. But what happens when viral misinformation is allowed to spread through areas of Africa that are already in the midst of ethnic violence? And what is Facebook doing to ensure its platform is not being used to disseminate lies, spread fear, and foment hatred in Nigeria’s troubled heartland? … Lai Mohammed, Nigeria’s minister of communications, spoke at the launch of the initiative in June. ‘In a multi-ethnic and multi-religious country like ours,’ he said, ‘fake news is a time bomb.'”
Better News
How the Bay Area News Group used Slack to improve internal communication during breaking news
“For really big stories such as a major earthquake, we would use threads as sub-channels to keep conversations together and from overlapping. So for instance, we would create the following sub-channels: PLANNING TODAY, WHO’S WHERE, LOGISTICS, BUDGET, PLANNING AHEAD, WHAT’S HAPPENING NOW. We could always create newer sub-channels as needed.”
Poynter / Daniel Funke
WhatsApp is paying researchers $1 million for misinformation research
Selected projects include “WhatsApp Vigilantes? WhatsApp messages and mob violence in India”, “Misinformation Vulnerabilities among Elderly during Disease Outbreaks”, and “WhatsApp Group and Digital Literacy Among Indonesian Women.”
TechCrunch / Jon Russell
Netflix is testing a mobile-only subscription to make its service more affordable
” The first reports are from Malaysia, where Netflix quietly rolled out a mobile-only tier priced at RM17, or around $4, each month. That’s half the price of the company’s next cheapest package — ‘Basic’ — which retails for RM33, or around $7.90, per month in Malaysia.”
Baseball Prospectus
Baseball Prospectus has been bought by its senior staff
“Baseball Prospectus was one of the early examples of the subscription model of [online] publication, and with sites like The Athletic, the rest of the sportswriting world is slowly coming around to our point of view. Quality baseball writing and analysis depends on an environment where consumers pay for their content, just as it always has.”
Associated Press / Lauren Easton
The AP says its new election projection system worked well
“In races for Senate and governor, AP VoteCast correctly projected the winner in 92 percent of races at 5 p.m. In the others, AP VoteCast had two as a tossup, with a projected difference between the candidates of less than one percentage point; three races remain too close to call a week after Election Day; and one incorrect winner was projected.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.