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The rise of bridge roles in news organizations
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The rise of bridge roles in news organizations
“In 2018, it’s important we start seriously thinking about how these roles — and the people in them — can evolve. These jobs are not easily categorized and are difficult to explain not only during a dinner party or in conversations with our parents — even colleagues battle to grasp their peculiarities.”
By Federica Cherubini
VR reaches the next level
“2018 is the year we all need to stop making excuses and jump head first into the unknown. We must embrace these technologies and understand the future of media will not be driven by what we’re already comfortable with.”
By Ray Soto
The Snapchat scenario and the risk of more closed platforms
“For those who see the relationship between platforms and publishers as a zero-sum game, having a platform like Facebook or YouTube stepping away from news might seem like a win.”
By Rasmus Kleis Nielsen
The year local media gets conservative
“2018 will be the year that every media market in the country gets its own Fox News-style voice at the local level.”
By Will Sommer
Social and media will split
“As users migrate to these closed systems, they’re also shifting away from the type of broad-based algorithmic feeds packed with news and media content that were the hallmark of first-generation social media.”
By Taylor Lorenz
Better design helps differentiate opinion and news
“Readers see articles posted on social media or shared by friends via email or messaging apps. It needs to be immediately obvious to the reader whether that content is news or opinion, and that’s something the industry is sorely failing at. “
By Rachel Schallom
The platforms’ power demands more reporters’ attention
“It is increasingly clear that the operation of the platforms, both from an antitrust perspective and even more importantly from the perspective of democratic governance, has received remarkably little scrutiny.”
By Richard J. Tofel
Women come back
“I am tired of seeing the same old faces dominate news and politics. I want to hear and see young, sensitized, informed, and clever people, from all perspectives and backgrounds, populate my infoscape.”
By Zizi Papacharissi
Peak push
“Push notifications can feel intrusive and I suspect many complaints about the editorial choices for push alerts are triggered by annoyance at being interrupted rather than their subject matter.”
By Nathalie Malinarich
Apple, off-Apple, and adaptations: These were the most important podcast trends of 2017
“I am struck by a distinct sense that we’re smack dab in the middle of a really slow but considerable change. Where we’ll be this time next year, I have no idea. But I can’t shake the feeling that it won’t look much like today.”
By Nicholas Quah
Former Gawker employees are crowdfunding to relaunch a Gawker.com that’s owned by a nonprofit and funded by readers
A Kickstarter campaign aims to raise $500,000 before January 8 to try to buy back and relaunch Gawker.com, which will be owned by a newly established nonprofit Gawker Foundation.
By Shan Wang
A growing turn to philanthropy
“In 2018, more nonprofit newsrooms will be launched than North Korean test missiles.”
By Bill Keller
Scooped by AI
“I’m not talking about computer-generated stories about earthquakes, earnings reports, or sports scores. These will be stories on your beat, written by humans who understand how to use machine learning to aid their reporting.”
By John Keefe
Retailers move into content
“The challenge to Internet users will be the same challenge we face in all aspects of journalism these days: How do you decide who to trust, and which takes seem authentic?”
By Jacqui Cheng
Apple, off-Apple, and adaptations: These were the most important podcast trends of 2017
“I am struck by a distinct sense that we’re smack dab in the middle of a really slow but considerable change. Where we’ll be this time next year, I have no idea. But I can’t shake the feeling that it won’t look much like today.”
By Nicholas Quah
Former Gawker employees are crowdfunding to relaunch a Gawker.com that’s owned by a nonprofit and funded by readers
A Kickstarter campaign aims to raise $500,000 before January 8 to try to buy back and relaunch Gawker.com, which will be owned by a newly established nonprofit Gawker Foundation.
With “My WSJ,” The Wall Street Journal makes a personalized content feed central to its app
“We don’t have to ask you anything. We just know, by virtue of you being a Journal reader, what you’d like to read and what you should read. You don’t have to tell us anything.”
What We’re Reading
Washington Post / JK Trotter
If you miss Gawker, don’t let Peter Thiel buy its archives
“What remains of Gawker now, following Thiel’s successful effort to ruin it after it published a story declaring that he was gay, is a corporate estate under the supervision of a bankruptcy court. Six of the websites that made up Gawker Media were purchased at auction by Univision last year, but Gawker.com and its published stories were left behind as assets for future liquidation. That leaves the possibility that someone will buy the site’s archive, delete it and use copyright law to force the removal of any remaining copies online.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Meg Dalton
Q&A: Jezebel’s new EIC on its legacy of fearless feminist reporting and what’s next
“In this climate where survivors are being believed and white men are losing their jobs and professional standing, I’m seeing Jezebel reporting from five years ago, six years ago, seven years ago re-circulating on Twitter. We’re seeing traffic from reporting that Jezebel alumni did several years ago. It’s really gratifying that large swaths of the Internet, they remember. They remember reading those allegations first on Jezebel.”
Axios / Sara Fischer
Former Mashable editor Jim Roberts joins Cheddar as EIC
“The company is also launching ‘Cheddar Scoops,’ an exclusive-news reporting unit. Business Insider’s Alex Heath is the first Cheddar Scoops hire.”
The New York Times / Kevin Roose
The “alt-right” created a parallel Internet. It’s an unholy mess.
“What I found on these sites was more pitiful than fear-inspiring. Sure, some alt-tech platforms were filled with upsetting examples of Nazi imagery and bigoted garbage. But most were ghost towns, with few active users and no obvious supervision. As technology products, many are second- or third-rate, with long load times, broken links and frequent error messages. A few had been taken offline altogether.”
Storify
Storify is shutting down
“Storify will no longer be available after May 16, 2018.”
Twitter
Twitter makes it easier to thread tweets and spot tweet threads
“We’ve made it easy to create a thread by adding a plus button in the composer, so you can connect your thoughts and publish your threaded Tweets all at the same time. You can continue adding more Tweets to your published thread at any time with the new ‘Add another Tweet’ button. Additionally, it’s now simpler to spot a thread — we’ve added an obvious ‘Show this thread’ label.”
Press Gazette / Dominic Ponsford
The first robot-generated stories from the Press Association’s automated news service have made it into print
“RADAR – the automated news service set up by PA (the Press Association) and Urbs Media – has begun trialling computer-generated data-driven content. The project is funded by a €700,000 grant from Google’s Digital News Initiative. The plan is for the project to create 30,000 localised stories a month from data using Natural Language Generation software to write them automatically.”
BuzzFeed / Charlie Warzel and Remy Smidt
YouTubers made hundreds of thousands off of bizarre and disturbing ‘family-friendly’ content
According to screenshots from one YouTuber’s account reviewed by BuzzFeed News, this father of two made more than $100,000 on his videos featuring his young kids — after YouTube’s 45% cut. Emails obtained by BuzzFeed News also show that twelve videos from the channel — videos that included “suspenseful” scenarios — were manually deemed “suitable for all advertisers” in November.
The New York Times / Mike Ives
Eluding censors, a magazine covers Southeast Asia’s literary scene
“The quarterly review aspires to be for Southeast Asia what Minh Bui Jones, Mekong Review’s founding editor and publisher, said the New York Review of Books and The London Review of Books had been since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Mekong Review is a long shot on many levels, not least because it covers a region where English literacy is patchy, postal systems are unreliable and newspapers that are not controlled by governments tend to struggle against censorship and chronic financial constraints.”
Variety / Todd Spangler
Bloomberg’s 24-hour news network for Twitter is called TicToc
The network goes live Dec. 18. TicToc will be supported by a team of about 50 reporters, editors, producers and social-media analysts, overseen by M. Scott Havens, Bloomberg’s global head of digital, and Mindy Massucci, who is the editorial lead of TicToc.
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.