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Americans say greater access to news sources is actually making it harder to stay informed
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Americans say greater access to news sources is actually making it harder to stay informed
But they’re evenly split on whether or not the news selection algorithms on sites like Facebook and Twitter should be regulated.
By Ricardo Bilton
For news nonprofits, the tax overhaul is bringing new uncertainty about future donations
“For us, it’s rare that someone cites the tax deductibility as a reason for giving. People are supporting us because they’re passionate about what we’re doing. People want to be a part of the community thats supporting us.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Who needs video? Slate is pivoting to audio, and making real money doing it
Plus: WBEZ tries to turn a podcast into a franchise, Science Friday joins WNYC Studios, and Gimlet opens up the HBO playbook.
By Nicholas Quah
If Facebook stops putting news in front of readers, will readers bother to go looking for it?
The idea that the value of a piece of news is defined by likes and comments — that taking in information without getting into a back-and-forth with your uncle about it is somehow unworthy — is actually a profoundly ideological statement.
By Joshua Benton
Facebook drastically changes News Feed to make it “good for people” (and bad for most publishers)
News publishers that have relied on Facebook for traffic will suffer.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Maybe the science and psychology of “post-truth” can’t explain this moment at all
Plus: A French law against fake news during elections; Facebook meets with its fact-checkers; fake news jeans.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Newsonomics: Can a new management team soothe the roiled Los Angeles Times newsroom?
New hires from The New York Times and The Washington Post bring new faces to a news organization that has been in flux under Tronc management.
By Ken Doctor
Global unhappiness with the news media is high. In the U.S. (surprise!) partisanship drives what people think about the media
In the U.S., supporting the party in power correlates with thinking the media does a terrible job. The opposite is true in nearly every other country surveyed.
By Shan Wang
It’s not “citizen journalism,” but it is “citizens taking notes at public meetings with no reporters around”
Chicago’s City Bureau is betting on local residents doing this sort of low-key not-quite-journalism at meetings, and now it’s expanding the model to Detroit.
By Christine Schmidt
China’s news agency is reinventing itself with AI
“We saw lots of interest in AI in China, and the sector is moving so fast in the country…The U.S. still has the best AI talent, but there are many good engineers and AI researchers in China as well.”
By Christine Schmidt
With its new newsletter director, The New Yorker wants to experiment with standalone and international-focused products
“Email is kind of like a living room. It’s a very personal space. You let in your friends, the coworkers you like, and a couple of brands you really trust — like this one.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Newsonomics: Can cross-subsidy (and nursing homes) help revive the Singapore Press?
“In the past one or two years, I’ve been reminding colleagues that we are not a newspaper company — we are a media company. The frame of change of mind is very important.”
By Ken Doctor
What the rise of the smart speaker might mean for podcasts (and on-demand audio in general)
Plus: In-car podcasts, Apple commissions an original TV show about a true crime podcast gone viral, and what’s going on with Podtrac?
By Nicholas Quah
From microplastics to mega-stories: Journalism nonprofit Orb works the global-local angle
“These commons — the air, the water, the soil, our food, our health — these are things we share, and they are deeply linked across countries. We need to start seeing them that way.”
By Christine Schmidt
Americans say greater access to news sources is actually making it harder to stay informed
But they’re evenly split on whether or not the news selection algorithms on sites like Facebook and Twitter should be regulated.
By Ricardo Bilton
For news nonprofits, the tax overhaul is bringing new uncertainty about future donations
“For us, it’s rare that someone cites the tax deductibility as a reason for giving. People are supporting us because they’re passionate about what we’re doing. People want to be a part of the community thats supporting us.”
Who needs video? Slate is pivoting to audio, and making real money doing it
Plus: WBEZ tries to turn a podcast into a franchise, Science Friday joins WNYC Studios, and Gimlet opens up the HBO playbook.
What We’re Reading
The Awl / The Awl
The Awl is shutting down at the end of the month
April 20, 2009- January 31, 2018.
The Cut / Madeleine Aggeler
What Is Babe.net, the website behind the Aziz Ansari story?
“It is a spinoff of the Tab, a news site that was founded by Cambridge University students in 2009, and whose content comes largely from student reporters at universities across the U.S. and U.K. It was founded by Eleni Mitzali, Amanda Ross, and other Tab editors, and its headquarters are at Tab Media’s U.S. offices in Brooklyn.”
Adage / Garett Sloane
Vice may risk losing cool cachet with brands over sexism concerns
Vice may be cool “but running a boys’ club culture is pretty counter to the values [our brands] are supposed to represent,” said one ad agency executive.
Adweek / David Cohen
Facebook’s News Feed bombshell shouldn’t have caught anyone off-guard
“We’ve been openly discussing the decline in organic reach for a long time—almost four years. I know it’s still surprising to many, but it certainly wasn’t a secret.”
Wired / Zeynep Tufekci
It’s the (democracy-poisoning) golden age of free speech
“Here’s how this golden age of speech actually works: In the 21st century, the capacity to spread ideas and reach an audience is no longer limited by access to expensive, centralized broadcasting infrastructure. It’s limited instead by one’s ability to garner and distribute attention. And right now, the flow of the world’s attention is structured, to a vast and overwhelming degree, by just a few digital platforms: Facebook, Google (which owns YouTube), and, to a lesser extent, Twitter.”
Journalism.co.uk / Caroline Scott
‘More views, angles and perspective’: Why community journalism may be the future of news
“We will see the movement evolve from communities producing shaky, hand-held footage to everybody being able to make content that is effectively as good as the broadcaster’s.”
Medium / AJ Labs
How Al Jazeera used gamification to conduct audience research.
The project doubled as news quiz and as a way for AJ Labs to gain some insights about some of its most loyal readers.
Digiday / Max Willens
How the Texas Tribune is enlisting the newsroom to grow membership revenue
By moving its membership operations out of its development department and into editorial, the Texas Tribune wants to better align the priorities of its membership program with reader interests.
Digiday / Lucia Moses
‘We’re pivoting to words’: Slate says podcasts are now 25 percent of revenue
Slate, which avoided the Facebook video gold rush that gripped the industry last year, has invested in video — to great success. In 2018, it plans to double its podcasting team to 10 people and increase its writing staff by 20 percent.
Digiday / Jessica Davies
Spiegel Online CEO Jesper Doub on the pivot to consumer revenue, the duopoly, and privacy regulations
“The issue is, how can [platforms] identify a credible journalistic source? Who makes that decision? If you look at the U.K., Germany, France, Spain, it’s easier as there’s a common sense of what professional journalism is. But if you look at a country like Turkey where the government has a totally different view on what proper journalism is, how do you handle that as a platform? Do you adhere to what the government view is in that country? It’s a difficult thing to do.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.