Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
With Reported.ly vets, NowThis wants to make social reporting core to its original content ambitions
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
With Reported.ly vets, NowThis wants to make social reporting core to its original content ambitions
NowThis’s success with its short newsy clips and distributed content ambitions gave it a model worth emulating. Now it’s looking beyond the format as it invests in longform video, investigative journalism, and other original content.
By Ricardo Bilton
“Media is broken,” so Medium’s launching a $5/month member program that offers small upgrades
“Let’s stop relying on ad buyers and social media echo chambers to determine what we put in our brains —  which is just as important, or more so, than what we put in our bodies,” Ev Williams says.
By Laura Hazard Owen
From coal to broadband to Trump’s budget, The Daily Yonder reports on rural life for the people actually living it
“Rural is like good art — you know it when you see it.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Want a calmer place to discover and discuss The Washington Post’s reporting? Try this Facebook group
“There’s a reason the group’s called PostThis — we want people to take stories we share there and actually post them to their own networks.”
By Shan Wang
Word up! This is the story behind The New York Times’ most famous tweet (which is 10 years old today)
“Once a month or so, that damn tweet would resurface.”
By Joseph Lichterman
Get ready to binge-listen to Serial’s new spinoff S-Town: All 7 episodes will drop at once next week
Plus: Panoply invests in audio fiction, Rookie links up with MTV, and Missing Richard Simmons wraps up its controversial run.
By Nicholas Quah
Avoiding articles from “the creep”: People trust news based on who shared it, not on who published it
“When people see news from a person they trust, they are more likely to think it got the facts right, contains diverse points of view, and is well reported.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
To slow the spread of false stories on WhatsApp, this Colombian news site is enlisting its own readers
Have a WhatsApp chain message you want factchecked? La Silla Vacía’s WhatsApp Detector first wants you to commit to spreading the factcheck to your friends.
By Carlos Serrano
As refugees resettle across Europe, four news organizations partner to tell the still-unfolding stories of integration
The outlets — El País, the Guardian, Le Monde, and Spiegel Online — represent four countries that are each their own case study for the next chapter of the migration story, on the changing face of Europe, and how these newcomers are welcomed.
By Shan Wang
Harvard Library gets slammed for its earnest fake news guide: Updates from the fake news world
Plus: The science of why we spread stories, Russian propaganda gets into fake news, and a “satirical” fake news site pulls the plug after Whoopi Goldberg calls it out.
By Laura Hazard Owen
“My goal in public media”: How 16 producers worked to create more community-focused journalism
New reports look at the impact of AIR’s Localore Finding America project, which embedded independent producers at public media stations around the country.
By Joseph Lichterman
This is what could happen if Donald Trump’s plan to eliminate funding for public broadcasting is enacted
“Ultimately, the system itself would be at serious risk of collapse.”
By Joseph Lichterman
With DCReport, David Cay Johnston — the man with Trump’s 1040 — wants to give readers a way to act on the stories they read
“That’s one of the reasons people have turned away from newspapers. They’re full of richly reported, detailed, and useless information. We want people to reacquire a sense that this is their government.”
By Ricardo Bilton
With Reported.ly vets, NowThis wants to make social reporting core to its original content ambitions
NowThis’s success with its short newsy clips and distributed content ambitions gave it a model worth emulating. Now it’s looking beyond the format as it invests in longform video, investigative journalism, and other original content.
By Ricardo Bilton
“Media is broken,” so Medium’s launching a $5/month member program that offers small upgrades
“Let’s stop relying on ad buyers and social media echo chambers to determine what we put in our brains —  which is just as important, or more so, than what we put in our bodies,” Ev Williams says.
What We’re Reading
The Verge / Casey Newton
Twitter is being unbundled before our eyes
“The two most resilient aspects of Twitter have been its real-time, public broadcasts, and the network of celebrities, politicians, athletes, and journalists who use it as their primary tool for starting public discussions. But now some well-funded companies are coming after those aspects of the service — and this time, they may succeed.”
Sports Illustrated / Tim Rohan
24 hours with ESPN NFL reporter Adam Schefter
“This will continue all day, Schefter texting and calling his sources, gossiping and trading information, building his own stockpile until he has enough to break a story. Then Schefter will send the news to his 6 million Twitter followers, or announce it on TV or radio or any of the other ESPN outlets he’ll appear on throughout the day. The majority of the league will get the news all at once, straight from Schefter’s mouth or from his Twitter account.”
Philly.com / Jeff Gammage
Philadelphia Media Network guild members vote down contract offer that would end seniority
“The contract between the Newspaper Guild and Philadelphia Media Network, owner of the three publications, expires in July, by which time the guild Health and Welfare Fund is projected to have run out of money. In that case, the company said in a letter to guild members, the owners will have to provide health insurance ‘at rates that cannot be predicted today.'”
WAN-IFRA / Simone Flueckiger
How Germany’s Zeit Online is bonding with millennials
“Thanks to its broad offer for students, it’s become a go-to source for those wanting to find out more about, among other things, what university is right for them, which courses and subjects they should take, and what life after graduation is going to be like.”
Journalism.co.uk / Caroline Scott
Norwegian weekly newspaper Kommunal Rapport uses data journalism to build its digital presence
“In 2010, we had one paper-based product which we hoped people would subscribe to once a year,” said Ole Petter Pedersen, news editor. “In 2017, we have eight digital products, seven of which are digital-only, and they are a fantastic source of income for us and a great opportunity for good, important journalism.”
Digiday / Lucinda Southern
How the Financial Times gets people to share more videos
“We need to ensure we are giving people the option to share video in the manner which they want to,” said Kayode Josiah, head of commercial development, video and audio at the FT. One sharing option the FT is exploring is an auto-populate email containing text about why this FT video is relevant to the recipient. “This isn’t hitting a share button on Facebook.”
HoldTheFrontPage.co.uk / Steve Dyson
Here’s a snapshot of regional media in the U.K. in 11 pie charts
“In summary, this suggests Trinity Mirror is out-performing the regional media in total website and social media audiences, with Archant hot on its heels in terms of ‘fastest growth’. (Post-publication note: Not all of Newsquest’s and Johnston Press’ websites and none of their social media followers are ABC audited.)”
Poynter / Kristen Hare
The Texas Tribune is using a Facebook Messenger bot to reach new audiences
“Unlike many bots, which simply connect Facebook messenger to content management systems maintained by news organizations, Paige is curated and has a different rhythm, [Amanda] Zamora said, delivering a look ahead on Mondays and a look back on Fridays.”
The Huffington Post / Michael Calderone
Trump escaped ‘wiretap’ and Russia questions in local TV interviews
“The White House made it clear the president would not answer questions about wiretapping or the investigation into Russia’s role in the election,” Lawrence Smith, a reporter at Louisville Fox affiliate WDRB in Louisville, said on air. “So we stuck to issues most directly important to Kentucky.”
TheStreet / Ken Doctor
Tronc investor Soon-Shiong ups stake again, as battle with Ferro crescendoes
“On Monday, Tronc Vice Chairman, would-be Friend of Trump, Los Angeles Lakers part-owner and anti-cancer crusader Patrick Soon-Shiong bought another 2 million shares of America’s second-largest public newspaper company. Soon-Shiong paid $30 million to HG Vora, a $15 a share payday for the activist investment firm, which pocketed the same per-share price from Tronc Chairman Michael Ferro’s Merrick Media in December as he bought 2.5 million shares of its Tronc stake.”
To close out 2016, we asked some of the smartest people we know to predict what 2017 will bring for the future of journalism. Here’s what they had to say.
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.