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Vox’s video about Chechen leader accused of torturing gay people is being spammed with dislikes
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Vox’s video about Chechen leader accused of torturing gay people is being spammed with dislikes
As of noon on Friday, the video had 8,453 likes and 4,703 dislikes. The typical ratio of likes to dislikes on a Vox video is 10:1.
By Shan Wang
You can now get a few additional features on Nuzzel for $100 a year
The news aggregator this week launched Nuzzel Pro, which is ad-free, lets users filter stories, and use a dark mode.
By Joseph Lichterman
Want to stop a spreading fake news story? Choose one of these four points of attack to fight back
Plus: The faces of a Russian botnet, an alt-right newsletter to subscribe to, and “falsehoods in a forest of facts.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Facebook will let publishers convert Instant Articles to Google AMP and Apple News formats
The move comes after a number of high-profile publishers have stepped back from Facebook’s distributed-content offering, preferring to direct Facebook mobile users to their websites.
By Joseph Lichterman
With its Special Projects Desk, Univision is keeping Gawker’s spirit alive at Gizmodo Media Group
The investigative unit, now at eight people, is dedicated to covering the inner workings of our most powerful institutions.
By Ricardo Bilton
Americans don’t really like the media much — unless it’s their go-to news outlets you’re asking about
Just 24 percent of Americans said they regard “the news media” as “moral,” but that number jumps to 53 percent for the media they consume often.
By Shan Wang
How The Washington Post plans to use Talk, The Coral Project’s new commenting platform
“By outlining and making clear what your expectations are for the space, you’re already creating a greater likelihood of success.”
By Joseph Lichterman
“Complementary, not competitive”: Philly’s NBC 10 is using web exclusives to find new viewers
“Storytelling is a differentiator. I wish we did more of it on the air, but since we don’t, we’re doing it in digital.
By Ricardo Bilton
Now you can take a 24-hour Trump news “snooze” on the Quartz app
(Want the break to be longer? Sorry.)
By Laura Hazard Owen
What an academic hoax can teach us about journalism in the age of Trump
From the “hermeneutics of quantum gravity” to the “conceptual penis,” attempted hoaxes tell us that our contemporary problems around truth are both cultural and structural.
By C.W. Anderson
Scribd says it has over 500,000 subscribers paying $8.99/month for ebooks, audiobooks, and now news
The content subscription site is adding content from newspapers like The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Vox’s video about Chechen leader accused of torturing gay people is being spammed with dislikes
As of noon on Friday, the video had 8,453 likes and 4,703 dislikes. The typical ratio of likes to dislikes on a Vox video is 10:1.
By Shan Wang
You can now get a few additional features on Nuzzel for $100 a year
The news aggregator this week launched Nuzzel Pro, which is ad-free, lets users filter stories, and use a dark mode.
Want to stop a spreading fake news story? Choose one of these four points of attack to fight back
Plus: The faces of a Russian botnet, an alt-right newsletter to subscribe to, and “falsehoods in a forest of facts.”
What We’re Reading
The Irish Times / Andrew Mangan
How a soccer site became more than just a daily blog
“The daily blog remains the centrepiece, but around it we have a seven-day-a-week news site, two podcasts a week, live events, books, videos, social media and lots more. And while a very large proportion of our audience is understandably UK based, 25 per cent of it is now from the USA and we have visitors from almost every country in the world.”
Storybench / Jeff Howe, Aleszu Bajak, Dina Kraft, and John Wihbey
What we learned from three years of interviews with data journalists, web developers and interactive editors at leading digital newsrooms
“There are a bunch of lessons we’ve learned through our interviews – published today in this working paper – that might help chart the way forward, especially for journalism schools. They boil down to three key areas of emphasis: 1) highly networked, team-based collaboration; 2) an ethos of open-source sharing, both within and between newsrooms; 3) and mobile-driven story presentation.”
BuzzFeed / Matthew Zeitlin
The media’s best-kept secret was a free Wall Street Journal login, and now it’s gone
“For years, one of the best/worst kept secrets in media circles was a login that unlocked the Wall Street Journal’s formidable paywall. Username: media. Password: media.”
Reddit
David Fahrenthold’s Reddit AMA
“That’s not the metric — that our stories are useless unless they cause the public to turn immediately and unanimously on the people write about. That’s not the point of them.”
Mashable / Jason Abbruzzese
How Lawfare became “a must-read destination for anyone trying to understand the news”
“In 2014, Lawfare did about 1.5 million visitors. It almost hit that number in just the first month of 2017. Lawfare has already set a new monthly record in May with 1.7 million visitors.”
The Information / Tony Haile
The trouble with news bundles
“Scroll CEO Tony Haile argues that the best way to put together a subscription bundle of news content is to guarantee readers an ad-free ‘experience’ across a range of premium sites without access to all the content. That would eliminate the problem of slow-to-load pages. And it wouldn’t cannibalize single-site subscriptions.”
Washingtonian / Andrew Beaujon
Has Washington DC’s WAMU solved public radio’s diversity problem?
“In 2014, about 45,000 weekly listeners were African-American and 49,000 Latino. By early this year, those audiences had leapt to about 106,000 apiece, almost a quarter of listeners. That’s far from reflecting the region as a whole, where blacks and Latinos account for about 40 percent of the population, but for a public-radio station it’s unusual.”
The New York Times / Stuart Emmrich
This 15-year-old writes a daily political newsletter with more than 2,000 subscribers
“In some ways, Wake Up is the anti-Skimm. It doesn’t dumb-down the daily political news for its audience and it occasionally highlights events that could challenge the interest of even the most-obsessive political fans.”
BuzzFeed / Maged Atef
Egyptian journalists say the government blocked websites to silence unfavorable coverage
“We are used to facing troubles with the regime since we have always chosen to write the stories they don’t like to hear. We are used to being arrested or have cases filed against us, but blocking us is a new thing.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.