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Newsonomics: Michael Ferro’s creeping privatization of Tronc
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Newsonomics: Michael Ferro’s creeping privatization of Tronc
Will his attempt to sideline investor Patrick Soon-Shiong lead to consolidated control, or will legal action push back? And did we ever figure out what a Tronc is, anyway?
By Ken Doctor
Is it still fake news if it makes you feel good? (Yes, yes it is): Updates from the fake news world
Plus: LinkedIn claims it doesn’t have a fake news problem, Facebook’s “disputed story” alerts are spotted in the wild, and middle schoolers get trained to be skeptical.
By Laura Hazard Owen
With Reported.ly vets, NowThis wants to make social reporting core to its original content ambitions
NowThis’s success with its short newsy clips and distributed content ambitions gave it a model worth emulating. Now it’s looking beyond the format as it invests in longform video, investigative journalism, and other original content.
By Ricardo Bilton
“Media is broken,” so Medium’s launching a $5/month member program that offers small upgrades
“Let’s stop relying on ad buyers and social media echo chambers to determine what we put in our brains —  which is just as important, or more so, than what we put in our bodies,” Ev Williams says.
By Laura Hazard Owen
From coal to broadband to Trump’s budget, The Daily Yonder reports on rural life for the people actually living it
“Rural is like good art — you know it when you see it.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Want a calmer place to discover and discuss The Washington Post’s reporting? Try this Facebook group
“There’s a reason the group’s called PostThis — we want people to take stories we share there and actually post them to their own networks.”
By Shan Wang
Word up! This is the story behind The New York Times’ most famous tweet (which is 10 years old today)
“Once a month or so, that damn tweet would resurface.”
By Joseph Lichterman
Get ready to binge-listen to Serial’s new spinoff S-Town: All 7 episodes will drop at once next week
Plus: Panoply invests in audio fiction, Rookie links up with MTV, and Missing Richard Simmons wraps up its controversial run.
By Nicholas Quah
Avoiding articles from “the creep”: People trust news based on who shared it, not on who published it
“When people see news from a person they trust, they are more likely to think it got the facts right, contains diverse points of view, and is well reported.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
To slow the spread of false stories on WhatsApp, this Colombian news site is enlisting its own readers
Have a WhatsApp chain message you want factchecked? La Silla Vacía’s WhatsApp Detector first wants you to commit to spreading the factcheck to your friends.
By Carlos Serrano
As refugees resettle across Europe, four news organizations partner to tell the still-unfolding stories of integration
The outlets — El País, the Guardian, Le Monde, and Spiegel Online — represent four countries that are each their own case study for the next chapter of the migration story, on the changing face of Europe, and how these newcomers are welcomed.
By Shan Wang
Harvard Library gets slammed for its earnest fake news guide: Updates from the fake news world
Plus: The science of why we spread stories, Russian propaganda gets into fake news, and a “satirical” fake news site pulls the plug after Whoopi Goldberg calls it out.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Newsonomics: Michael Ferro’s creeping privatization of Tronc
Will his attempt to sideline investor Patrick Soon-Shiong lead to consolidated control, or will legal action push back? And did we ever figure out what a Tronc is, anyway?
By Ken Doctor
Is it still fake news if it makes you feel good? (Yes, yes it is): Updates from the fake news world
Plus: LinkedIn claims it doesn’t have a fake news problem, Facebook’s “disputed story” alerts are spotted in the wild, and middle schoolers get trained to be skeptical.
With Reported.ly vets, NowThis wants to make social reporting core to its original content ambitions
NowThis’s success with its short newsy clips and distributed content ambitions gave it a model worth emulating. Now it’s looking beyond the format as it invests in longform video, investigative journalism, and other original content.
What We’re Reading
Digiday / Sahil Patel
6 reasons why Snapchat Discover is getting overrun by bland viral fare
“[Hearst’s] Sweet, which launched as a Snapchat Discover-only publication with a focus on long-form profiles and smarter content, has recently been asked to be more like Cosmo and make lighter fare.”
The Ringer / Kyle Chayka
The new leftist media wants more than to take down Trump
A look at outlets like Jacobin, Current Affairs, Chapo Trap House, and The Baffler.
Digiday / Lucia Moses
These two MIT grads are having their 15 minutes of programmatic fame
It’s apparently not a stock photo: The women in that ubiquitous ad are Laura Zhang (with the ponytail) and Denise Tang, both 24 and quantitative SEO analysts at the Massachusetts-based company EverQuote.
TechCrunch / Josh Constine
Facebook finally tests a GIF button for comments
“At first this GIF comment button will only be available to a small percentage of Facebook users, but it could roll out to everyone if it proves popular. It will work similarly to the GIF button in Facebook Messenger, allowing users to both browse trending GIFs and search for specific reactions in-line. Users still won’t have the ability to select and share GIFs as News Feed posts, but comment GIFs could lay the groundwork for that.”
The New York Times / Erin Geiger Smith
Welcome to the podcast. First, a word from our celebrity.
“How many start-up meal-delivery companies can get Alec Baldwin to read their menus aloud in his deep, recognizable voice? That’s precisely what Baldwin does for Blue Apron on his podcast ‘Here’s the Thing’: ‘He definitely romances our ingredients.'”
HoldTheFrontPage / David Sharman
Christchurch Times revived almost 35 years after closure
“The first issue features a masthead first used by the Advertiser 100 years ago in 1917, as well as local news, nostalgia, sport, and its traditional back page vox pop.”
Journalism.co.uk / Madalina Ciobanu
Piqd is combining expertise from academics, journalists, and professionals to curate news
“Piqd has a website and a newsletter that recommends ‘outstanding pieces of journalism in an accessible way’ to readers, curated by journalists, academics and professionals in a number of fields.”
Tech in Asia / Steven Millward
The News Lens in Taiwan is on track to go from startup to media empire
The site, founded in 2013, has now grown to six million readers across four editions of the site in Chinese and English, and is staffed by 70 people. This week the site hired away from cable TV a major Taiwanese news anchor.
Poynter / Benjamin Mullin
Campbell Brown on filter bubbles, fake news, and Facebook’s role in the news industry
“Brown acknowledged that, with so many people consuming news on Facebook every day, the company has a responsibility to make sure information is thorough and accurate. And because news draws users, it’s in Facebook’s best interests to ensure that there’s a wealth of quality information, she said.”
Journalism.co.uk / Catalina Albeanu
How Le Monde aims to reflect a range of voices ahead of the French election
“We have beat reporters covering political parties, but a lot of people just don’t care about this.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.