HOME
          
LATEST STORY
The Upshot uses geolocation to push readers deeper into data
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
The Upshot uses geolocation to push readers deeper into data
The New York Times story changes its text depending on where you’re reading it: “It’s a fine line between a smarter default and being creepy.”
By Justin Ellis
Elise goes East: How NPR’s new Seoul bureau chief is using Tumblr to complement her reporting
Since moving to South Korea in March, Elise Hu has been using Tumblr to document everything from the serious to the silly — and expand her voice beyond the NPR airwaves.
By Joseph Lichterman
When disgusting goes viral: Strong negative emotions can push social sharing through the roof
In this excerpt from his new book, Alfred Hermida explores the connection between moral violation and Facebook likes.
By Alfred Hermida
Circa, the buzzed-about mobile news app, is running out of money
Its core ideas have always been compelling, but Circa has been unable to find an audience large enough to attract new investment.
By Joshua Benton
Newsonomics: The Guardian is trying to swing Google’s pendulum back to publishers
With two major partnership moves, The Guardian’s Andrew Miller is trying to find a stronger position for premium publishers in a Google/Facebook-dominated world.
By Ken Doctor
In earthquake-ravaged Nepal, the BBC is using messaging app Viber to share information and safety tips
The broadcaster is following up on an experiment using WhatsApp to provide updates on the fight against Ebola in West Africa.
By Joseph Lichterman
The State of the News Media 2015: Newspapers ↓, smartphones ↑
The annual omnibus report from Pew outlines a story of continued trends more than radical change.
By Joseph Lichterman
Here’s how BuzzFeed is thinking about its international growth
Mexico is the viral giant’s latest target for expansion. Will it continue leading with listicles and nostalgia, or is there more room for news in how it introduces BuzzFeed to new territories?
By Joseph Lichterman
Collaborating across borders: European journalists band together to track the migrant crisis
Language barriers make cross-border work tricky, but for complex multinational topics, it can one of the only ways to get the true measure of a story.
By Melissa Bailey
What are the boundaries of today’s journalism, and how is the rise of digital changing who defines them?
In a new book, a group of academics look at how the big defining questions of the field — what is journalism? who is a journalist? who decides? — are changing.
By Matt Carlson & Seth C. Lewis
Esquire has a cold: How the magazine is mining its archives with the launch of Esquire Classics
“We’re continuing our experiments with seeing what kinds of great archival stories people want to read and what formats seem to be most popular.”
By Joseph Lichterman
The Atlantic redesigns, trading clutter and density for refinement
It wants to be a “real-time magazine” on the web, connected to its print heritage. But stripping out the visual noise won’t please everyone.
By Joshua Benton
The Upshot uses geolocation to push readers deeper into data
The New York Times story changes its text depending on where you’re reading it: “It’s a fine line between a smarter default and being creepy.”
By Justin Ellis
Elise goes East: How NPR’s new Seoul bureau chief is using Tumblr to complement her reporting
Since moving to South Korea in March, Elise Hu has been using Tumblr to document everything from the serious to the silly — and expand her voice beyond the NPR airwaves.
When disgusting goes viral: Strong negative emotions can push social sharing through the roof
In this excerpt from his new book, Alfred Hermida explores the connection between moral violation and Facebook likes.
What We’re Reading
Chartbeat / Tony Haile
Chartbeat raises $15 million in new investment and releases new products
“We want those in the business of content to succeed by appealing to their readers’ minds more than their index fingers, and to know that the quality of their content affects the value of the page.”
The New York Times / John Koblin
Al Jazeera America, its newsroom in turmoil, is now the news
“Almost two years later, the ratings have not come, nor have the profits. The station has been a nonfactor in news, drawing about 30,000 viewers a night. To make matters worse, in the last week, a lawsuit and an exodus of top executives have brought to the surface a series of grievances that employees say reflects a deep dysfunction in management of the newsroom, undermining the network’s mission.”
Recode / By Peter Kafka
Twitter has a short-term Periscope problem. And a long-term media mess.
“No matter how hard it tries to deny it, Twitter is a media company. And the bigger Twitter gets, the more likely that its media partners — the ones it wants to buy advertising and provide Twitter with engaging content — will eventually see it as competition.”
Capital / Ken Doctor
New York Times CTO Rajiv Pant leaves to join a startup
In four years at the Times, Pant played a role in improving the paper’s paywall, rolling out the NYT5 redesign, and creating the first data science team.
Poynter / Rick Edmonds
R.I.P. six-month newspaper circulation reports
The Alliance for Audited Media is now requiring papers to supply quarterly circulation figures. Offering digital readership numbers on a monthly basis is optional.
Politico / Dylan Byers
The New York Times continues to refine its editorial meetings to focus on digital
“Our large and growing mobile readership is coming to us early in the day and we need to continue to find ways to better serve that audience, as well as the many readers who find us on their desktops during the day.”
The Verge / Ben Popper
Reddit launches a video division to create original content
“One of our first projects will be taking the authenticity and connection created by our Ask Me Anything interviews and translating that into video.”
The Guardian / Helene Sears
How The Guardian built its Apple Watch app
How do you think about designing an app for a brand new device?
NPR / Demian Perry
The NPR One API is now open to select developers
In case you’re building a connected car or a fridge with Internet radio.
Twitter / Michael Sippey
Google wants to send Android users notifications from apps they don’t even use
Example: “An amusement-park goer should see the top rides’ wait times on their phone automatically.” Potential implications for news apps (an, if implemented poorly, increasing net human annoyance).
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.
What to read next
900
tweets
The State of the News Media 2015: Newspapers ↓, smartphones ↑
The annual omnibus report from Pew outlines a story of continued trends more than radical change.
579What USA Today Sports learned covering the Final Four on Periscope and Snapchat
These new platforms are optimized for realtime news on phones, but there are lots of questions for news organizations — from what content to share to how to measure their effectiveness.
410Journalists shouldn’t lose their rights in their move to private platforms
The shift to distributed content means concepts like fair use are increasingly in the hands of private companies — like SoundCloud.
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Fuego is our heat-seeking Twitter bot, tracking the links the future-of-journalism crowd is talking about most on Twitter.
Here are a few of the top links Fuego’s currently watching.   Get the full Fuego ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
Time
New West
Arizona Guardian
OpenFile
Demand Media
Grist
Newsweek
Storify
Franklin Center
Financial Times
Voice of San Diego
USA Today