Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Will Vox’s new section on effective altruism…well, do any good?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Will Vox’s new section on effective altruism…well, do any good?
“It came out of a sense that there were some really important topics with impacts on human beings that didn’t get as much coverage in traditional journalism sections and pieces.”
By Christine Schmidt
Chasing leads and herding cats: How journalism’s latest job title — partner manager — works in ProPublica’s newsroom
“In short, we came to think that the collaboration itself was something that needed editing.”
By Rachel Glickhouse
What have tech companies done wrong with fake news? Google (yep) lists the ways
Plus: A woman-oriented fact-checking initiative, and possible problems with California’s media literacy bill.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Trump’s USA Today op-ed demonstrates why it’s time to unbundle news and opinion content
“At a time when both the public and algorithms are trying to understand what journalism means and how to distinguish between news and opinion, publishers should make it more clear what makes journalism special.”
By Eli Pariser
The Outline built itself on being “weird.” But is it weird enough to survive?
“We’re not the enemy. This is a really shitty industry for writers.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
A Chorus of publishers: Vox Media onboards the Chicago Sun-Times as its first licensee since launch
“The joke in the industry is everybody doesn’t like the CMS or they write in some other tool.” Vox Media aims to change that punchline for other publishers.
By Christine Schmidt
Venture philanthropy for local news might not be as scary as it sounds
The American Journalism Project, led by two top nonprofit news veterans, aims to propel $1 billion in annual investments to mission-driven local news outlets.
By Christine Schmidt
What is up with Apple’s screwy (and seemingly scammy) podcast charts?
Plus: Spotify opens up its podcast section to everyone, Google bets on small producers, and The New York Times goes roundtable.
By Nicholas Quah
Stat, with subscriptions nearing 50 percent of revenue, looks to big companies for more members
“We’ve become focused a little more on the paying subscribers.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Here’s how much Americans trust 38 major news organizations (hint: not all that much!)
About 13 percent of Americans don’t trust any news outlet at all. (They went 2-to-1 for Trump in 2016.)
By Joshua Benton
A new study provides some dispiriting evidence for why people fall for stupid fake images online
Plus: A U.K. report calls for governments to tread cautiously when it comes to fake news, as some other governments seem prepared to do the opposite.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Will Vox’s new section on effective altruism…well, do any good?
“It came out of a sense that there were some really important topics with impacts on human beings that didn’t get as much coverage in traditional journalism sections and pieces.”
By Christine Schmidt
Chasing leads and herding cats: How journalism’s latest job title — partner manager — works in ProPublica’s newsroom
“In short, we came to think that the collaboration itself was something that needed editing.”
What have tech companies done wrong with fake news? Google (yep) lists the ways
Plus: A woman-oriented fact-checking initiative, and possible problems with California’s media literacy bill.
What We’re Reading
CNN Business / Hadas Gold
The New York Times shuts down its $11,995 guided Saudi Arabia tours
“‘In light of the uncertainty surrounding the disappearance of the Washington Post’s Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi consulate in Turkey, The New York Times has decided to cancel all upcoming Times Journeys departures to Saudi Arabia,’ a New York Times spokesperson said in an email… The journey to Saudi Arabia was advertised as ‘Saudi Arabia and the Emirates: The Past and Future of Oil.'”
The Atlantic / Taylor Lorenz
Instagram, with a goal “to be the safest platform online,” has a massive harassment problem
“‘When you’re hanging out on Instagram it’s easy to feel part of a big friendly happy group,’ said Zoe Fraade-Blanar, author of the book Superfandom. ‘But being part of an angry mob with those same people is also a lot of fun, and that’s why you get these huge uprisings.'”
Global Editors Network / Freia Nahser
How BuzzFeed is using automation
“For example, if the team were trying to identify what kind of content to adapt from the English-speaking to the Portuguese market, the model would go through data, including performance split by country, all historical articles, and all articles that have been translated from English to Portuguese in the past, and a ‘hotness score’ would be generated based on the output of the logistic regression. The higher the hotness score, the more likely it is that the article will be a success.”
Brian Stelter and Dianne Gallagher
Florida newsrooms turn to Facebook Live and sister stations after Hurricane Michael pummels the newsrooms
“The morning assignment meeting on Friday was held in a circle in the parking lot. The staff produced another newscast from the parking lot on Friday night. The backdrop was a giant chunk of roof that flew off a nearby building.”
Medium / Heather Bryant
“What would journalism be if we actually changed all the things we say we want to change?”
“The future of journalism is and always will be people. The thing that will save journalism is people. The ones in our newsrooms and the ones outside our newsrooms. People from all kind of backgrounds and perspectives. People who seek to use their voice to empower others. People who work together. Our future depends on how we treat them, how we include or exclude them, how we represent and serve them and how we invest in them.”
Wired / Rossalyn Warren
Egypt is using the country’s “fake news” law to imprison women who share their sexual harassment experiences on social media
“It’s not uncommon for women to turn to Twitter and Facebook to speak out against harassment, particularly in the #MeToo era. But Mona faced a different problem. Her arrest came at a time when Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi approved new legislation aimed at targeting people guilty of spreading ‘false news’ about Egypt.”
CBS News / 60 Minutes
Trump vows “severe punishment” if Saudi Arabia killed Jamal Khashoggi
“‘There’s a lot at stake,’ Mr. Trump continued. ‘And, maybe especially so because this man was a reporter. There’s something, you’ll be surprised to hear me say that, there’s something really terrible and disgusting about that if that were the case. We’re going to get to the bottom of it and there will be severe punishment.'”
New York Post / Josh Kosman and Keith J. Kelly
McClatchy is allegedly worried Patrick Soon-Shiong won’t come through in a Tribune Publishing deal
“Now, however, McClatchy is approaching [billionaire Leon] Black’s Apollo [Management, a buyout firm] for debt financing, rather than asking it to become a co-owner, according to sources. It’s not yet clear whether Black — known to be friendly with former Tronc Chairman Michael Ferro — will do a deal, and if so on what terms, sources said.”
Talking Points Memo / Josh Marshall
Talking Points Memo is launching a super-premium tier called TPM Inside
A level above its current paid product, TPM Prime. “Think of Inside like a running conversation we’re going to hold with the most interesting and knowledgable people in the world of politics, public policy and elections, which we’re inviting you to be a part of.”
White House Watch / Dan Froomkin
“Good luck separating ‘journalism’ and ‘opinion’ in the age of Trump”
A response to Eli Pariser’s Nieman Lab piece: “Especially in this day and age, you need a heavy does of context and analysis to make sense of what’s being said and done. ‘Straight’ stenography, in contrast, is the opposite of journalism.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.