Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
With in-article chat bots, BBC is experimenting with new ways to introduce readers to complex topics
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
With in-article chat bots, BBC is experimenting with new ways to introduce readers to complex topics
“For us, this is a way to let people read and ask questions at their own pace, instead of having them read through long screens of text. Often people aren’t engaged in stories because they haven’t had the right context.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Can we keep media literacy from becoming a partisan concept like fact checking?
Plus: Screen time debates, and what the data says about kids and smartphones.
By Laura Hazard Owen
After years of testing, The Wall Street Journal has built a paywall that bends to the individual reader
Non-subscribers visiting WSJ.com now get a score, based on dozens of signals, that indicates how likely they’ll be to subscribe. The paywall tightens or loosens accordingly: “The content you see is the output of the paywall, rather than an input.”
By Shan Wang
This TV station took a “marvelous” Facebook fast — and thinks other media companies should too
“What we took away was that we can easily live without Facebook.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Newsonomics: Will Michael Ferro double down on newspapers or go digital?
Does he really want to take on becoming the great consolidator of the American press, conquering once-mighty Gannett? Or will he exit the field — richer, but his ambitions humbled?
By Ken Doctor
With audience engagement and live events, Finimize is finding new ways to boost readers’ financial literacy
“Publications like the Financial Times and Wall Street Journal assume a lot of things about what their readers know. If the price of oil goes up, what happens to the dollar? They assume you know that. We assume our readers don’t.”
By Ricardo Bilton
With a year of guides to a better life, The New York Times hopes to convert more readers to subscribers
“This is all about how we can provide subscribers with the type of content that makes them feel like they’re getting insight they’re not getting anywhere else.” It’s also a bet on keeping some content subscriber-only, not subject to its five-articles-a-month metered paywall.
By Christine Schmidt
Will moving to radio put a strain on what makes The Daily work so well as a podcast?
Plus: The daily news podcast space gets a little more crowded, The Guardian experiments with an augmented player, and Amazon wants to turn your blog into a podcast.
By Nicholas Quah
Are news publishers directly liable for embedding tweets that contain images not created by that tweeter?
A New York federal judge ruled that when publishers from The Boston Globe to Vox Media to Breitbart “caused the embedded tweets to appear on their websites, their actions violated plaintiff’s exclusive display right.”
By Shan Wang
What strategies work best for increasing trust in local newsrooms? Trusting News has some ideas
“It’s not so much about gaming Facebook’s algorithm or working with the Facebook changes as much as it is taking advantage of Facebook as a truly social platform.”
By Christine Schmidt
With in-article chat bots, BBC is experimenting with new ways to introduce readers to complex topics
“For us, this is a way to let people read and ask questions at their own pace, instead of having them read through long screens of text. Often people aren’t engaged in stories because they haven’t had the right context.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Can we keep media literacy from becoming a partisan concept like fact checking?
Plus: Screen time debates, and what the data says about kids and smartphones.
After years of testing, The Wall Street Journal has built a paywall that bends to the individual reader
Non-subscribers visiting WSJ.com now get a score, based on dozens of signals, that indicates how likely they’ll be to subscribe. The paywall tightens or loosens accordingly: “The content you see is the output of the paywall, rather than an input.”
What We’re Reading
TechCrunch / Sarah Perez
Anchor relaunches its app with more of a focus on podcast creation
“While in the past, Anchor was carving out a niche for itself in the short-form, social audio space, the new version – Anchor 3.0 – aims to be everything you need to record, edit, host, publish, and distribute a podcast of any length, as well as track how well the podcast is performing.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Pete Brown
RIP, Facebook Live: As subsidies end, so does publisher participation
“The number of Facebook Live videos produced by paid partners more than halved by the end of 2017 — and in one case fell by as much as 94 percent — as once guaranteed payments ended and Facebook deprioritized the product, new Tow Center research suggests.”
The Outline / Paris Martineau
Medium suspends the accounts of alt-right leaders Mike Cernovich, Jack Posobiec, and Laura Loomer
Medium changed its rules: “We do not allow posts or accounts that engage in on-platform, off-platform, or cross-platform campaigns of targeting, harassment, hate speech, violence, or disinformation. We may consider off-platform actions in assessing a Medium account, and restrict access or availability to that account.”
BuzzFeed / Charlie Warzel
Why can everyone spot fake news but the tech companies?
“How is it that the average untrained human can do something that multibillion-dollar technology companies that pride themselves on innovation cannot? And beyond that, why is it that — after multiple national tragedies politicized by malicious hoaxes and misinformation — such a question even needs to be asked?”
Marketing Land / Ginny Marvin
Facebook is removing 20 outdated, redundant ad metrics
“The changes come after the company admitted a series of measurement problems in a span of nearly two years and has heard from advertisers that they want more clarity around how its metrics are calculated.”
Wired / Issie Lapowsky
A consortium of public radio stations is bringing back Gothamist, LAist, DCist, and DNAinfo
The stations include WNYC in New York, WAMU in Washington, DC, and KPCC in Southern California. “The deal was spearheaded by Gothamist founders Jake Dobkin and Jen Chung, and is being funded by two anonymous donors who have contributed an undisclosed sum to acquire the brands. As part of the deal, the archives of those sites will remain online, and Gothamist, led by Dobkin and Chung, will begin publishing new stories this spring.”
Bloomberg / Justina Vasquez
In one tweet, Kylie Jenner wiped out $1.3 billion of Snap’s market value
“sooo does anyone else not open Snapchat anymore? Or is it just me… ugh this is so sad.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Mathew Ingram
Fake news is part of a bigger problem: automated propaganda
“This ability to have mass distribution at extremely low cost enables propaganda at an entirely different scale, one we’ve never seen before. And it uses all of the information that we as users are consciously and unconsciously providing, to produce individualized propaganda.”
Twitter / Yoel Roth
Twitter cracks down on some automation across multiple accounts
“Today, we’re also introducing changes to TweetDeck’s multiple account functionality to reflect this guidance. Users of TweetDeck will no longer be able to select multiple accounts through which to perform an action such as Tweeting, Retweeting, liking, or following.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.