Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Facebook’s attempts to fight fake news seem to be working. (Twitter’s? Not so much.)
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Facebook’s attempts to fight fake news seem to be working. (Twitter’s? Not so much.)
Plus: How YouTubers spread far-right beliefs (don’t just blame algorithms), and another cry for less both-sides journalism.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Public or closed? How much activity really exists? See how other news organizations’ Facebook Groups are faring
We analyzed the data of groups as large as 40,000 members and as small as 300, from international organizations to local publishers. How does yours fit in?
By Christine Schmidt
Here’s what the Financial Times is doing to get bossy man voice out of (okay, less prominent in) its opinion section
“She wrote a fabulous piece that did incredibly well and I think there’s no way on earth that (a) she would have submitted or (b) it would have run, before we started this stuff. It got more than double the usual number of pageviews for an opinion piece.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
How to buy into journalism’s blockchain future (in only 44 steps)
Blockchain-and-journalism startup Civil aims to build a decentralized infrastructure for news, and you can invest in their vision. It just might take you a while.
By John Keefe
How the Broke in Philly collaboration is focusing local media’s attention on poverty and economic mobility
“As journalists, we’re taught to be competitive and territorial. On the other hand, things are changing dramatically, so don’t assume other people in your local market don’t want to collaborate.”
By Christine Schmidt
How France beat back information manipulation (and how other democracies might do the same)
“French success resulted from a combination of structural factors, luck, as well as the effective anticipation and reaction of the Macron campaign staff, the government, and civil society, especially the mainstream media.”
By Christine Schmidt
The Guardian is getting into the daily news podcast game — here’s what it learned the last time it tried
“If you didn’t read The Guardian or know anything about it, you should be able to listen to that podcast and get an idea of the stories we thought were important. We certainly tried to reflect The Guardian’s values.”
By Caroline Crampton
The New York Times Magazine wants to send you on an audio “voyage,” featuring bats, rats, and volcanos
Plus: The real-world impact of true-crime shows, Serial prepares its return, and an NBC podcast built around an Instagram account.
By Nicholas Quah
Cataclysm looming or a business maturing? How to interpret all the recent shakeups in the podcast industry
The past few years marked a period of unchecked experimentation on a large scale. Now, the tests have been run, the results have come in, and the time has come to shift resources based on what was found.
By Nicholas Quah
Newsonomics: Could a McClatchy-Tronc merger help local newspapers transition to digital?
One’s a family-controlled, century-plus-old newspaper chain, known for believing in its civic mission but not for its digital strategy. The other is, well, Tronc. With an assist from L.A.’s richest man, could this be a path forward?
By Ken Doctor
“The cure lies within us, if we have the will and the imagination to develop it”
“Because journalism is not The New York Times, or BuzzFeed, or the Miami Herald. When you strip everything down to its essential function, journalism is a system for collecting, synthesizing, verifying and distributing news. Everything else is just form.”
By Heather Chaplin
$20 million is heading toward local news from the Lenfest Institute and Knight Foundation
“It’s not just an initiative — it’s an opportunity for others to join to address these challenges for local news, around the country and in Philadelphia.”
By Christine Schmidt
Facebook’s attempts to fight fake news seem to be working. (Twitter’s? Not so much.)
Plus: How YouTubers spread far-right beliefs (don’t just blame algorithms), and another cry for less both-sides journalism.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Public or closed? How much activity really exists? See how other news organizations’ Facebook Groups are faring
We analyzed the data of groups as large as 40,000 members and as small as 300, from international organizations to local publishers. How does yours fit in?
Here’s what the Financial Times is doing to get bossy man voice out of (okay, less prominent in) its opinion section
“She wrote a fabulous piece that did incredibly well and I think there’s no way on earth that (a) she would have submitted or (b) it would have run, before we started this stuff. It got more than double the usual number of pageviews for an opinion piece.”
What We’re Reading
The Verge / Russell Brandom
PayPal bans Infowars for promoting hate
“Infowars had used PayPal to process transactions for its on-site store; the site will have ten days to find new payment processors.”
Wall Street Journal / Benjamin Mullin
Mic is reportedly running out of money, considering an acquisition offer
“Mic executives believe that, within the next year, the company will have to sell or consider other options to raise capital or cut expenses, the people said.”
White House Watch / Dan Froomkin
Press coverage of Trump’s tweet fails to explain what’s wrong with it
“Stories about Trump’s tweets shouldn’t be simply about the fact that he tweeted them. And they shouldn’t just assume that readers can understand what’s so wrong about them. Journalism requires context, here more than ever.”
Poynter / Daniel Funke
How The New York Times, Mother Jones, and others are asking readers to help them cover election misinformation
“What we hope to do in the coming days and weeks is target voters and use Facebook’s own technology and use paid promotion to reach voters.”
The New Yorker / Mark O'Connell
The deliberate awfulness of social media
“Lanier has coined a term for this process: he calls it bummer, which stands for ‘Behaviours of Users Modified, and Made into an Empire for Rent.'”
TechCrunch / Eric Peckham
Old media giants turn to VC for their next act
“Of the traditional media companies that have committed to corporate venturing, there are two distinct strategies: those whose investing seems to be about replacing the historic classifieds section of newspapers and diversifying into a range of consumer-facing marketplaces, and those whose investing is concentrated on capturing an early glimpse (and early equity stake) in startups reshaping media.”
Digiday / Lucinda Southern
Quartz forges ahead with 360-degree video while others scale back
“While Quartz has had a 360-degree mobile player in some form for the last two and half years, newer handsets and operating systems have made a big improvement to data-heavy operations like video. It took two engineers and designer spending most of their time over 10 weeks to get the mobile player to the point that Quartz felt comfortable selling it into clients.”
Motherboard / Joseph Cox and Jason Koebler
Facebook is reviewing its policy on white nationalism
“Leaked internal documents show that Facebook’s content moderators are explicitly instructed to allow ‘white separatism’ and ‘white nationalism’ on the platform, but note that ‘white supremacy’ is banned. Facebook makes this distinction because it argues in those documents that white nationalism ‘doesn’t seem to be always associated with racism (at least not explicitly.)'”
American Society of News Editors
Only 234 out of 1,700 newspapers and digital media outlets have filled out the ASNE diversity survey (aka DO IT NOW)
The Ford Foundation, News Integrity Initiative, Lenfest Institute, Democracy Fund, Logan Family Foundation, Knight Foundation, and McCormick Foundation released a joint statement urging newsroom leaders to complete the survey. If your newsroom needs a link to the survey, then contact lead researcher Dr. Meredith Clark, assistant professor of the University of Virginia’s Department of Media Studies, at mdc6j@virginia.edu, or ASNE Executive Director Teri Hayt at thayt@asne.org.
Press Gazette / Charlotte Tobitt
The Times of London is putting its free politics email newsletter behind the paywall
“I’m glad you’re still enjoying Red Box, but you are not getting the most out of it without a full subscription to read the stories, columns, interviews, reviews, obituaries and letters which I link to every day. So from next week Red Box will only be available to Times subscribers.” (We wrote about the email’s underlying tech back in 2015.)
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.