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Quartz is using Apple’s new AR tech to “help people understand objects in the news” on iPhones
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Quartz is using Apple’s new AR tech to “help people understand objects in the news” on iPhones
Apple’s new augmented-reality tools will open up new ways to illustrate stories: “It’s not quite drag-and-drop for producers, but it’s super close to that when it comes to the backend.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Report for America wants to place (and help pay for) young reporters in local newsrooms that need them
“This was once something that a whole generation of journalists got to do to start their careers. Sadly, we’ve seen it disappear. We want to restore that tradition.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Media in the Middle East: A new study shows how the Arab world gets and shares digital news
Two-thirds of respondents in the countries studied said they get news from social media every day.
By Everette E. Dennis and Robb Wood
This former hedge fund guy is a one-man nonprofit investigating some of America’s shadiest companies
“You can’t stop these guys from getting rich as hell and doing things, but I can at least have a marker laid out there in the cyber world saying: Hey, take a hard look.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
The future of news is humans talking to machines
That’s the argument of the BBC’s Trushar Barot, who believes voice AI is the biggest technology revolution that the news industry is missing — and that it’s not too late to do something about it.
By Trushar Barot
BuzzFeed’s strategy for getting content to do well on all platforms? Adaptation and a lot of A/B testing
Multiple versions of articles — with different headlines but also of different lengths and using different thumbnail art — are shown to BuzzFeed.com visitors until a winning combination emerges after a couple of hours.
By Shan Wang
You could change your mind. Or maybe (comforting thought!) you could just let Facebook do it for you
Plus: “The year’s most consequential storylines have collided,” the differences between “observational” and direct correction, and one more trip to Macedonia.
By Laura Hazard Owen
With scripted comedy videos, The Washington Post wants to provide “new entry points to the news”
“[The] very difficult task is to figure out how we get people to think of us as a video destination, and that destination does not have to be Washingtonpost.com.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Stopping fake news on social can feel like playing whack-a-mole. This tiny fact-checking operation in India thinks it’s making a small dent
“The impact we’ve made has been noticeable on people in powerful positions, whether it’s politicians or mainstream media. We’ve opened them up, to see that you can’t ignore this, and that’s a good first step.”
By Shan Wang
Small pieces, loosely joined (oh, and a new iPhone): These are today’s key Apple updates for publishers
Apple steps a little closer toward the constellation of devices that follow the smartphone.
By Joshua Benton
Adding a “disputed” label to fake news seems to work, a little. But for some groups, it actually backfires
Labeling only some fake news stories as fake can make some people more likely to believe other fake news that aren’t labeled.
By Shan Wang
Quartz is using Apple’s new AR tech to “help people understand objects in the news” on iPhones
Apple’s new augmented-reality tools will open up new ways to illustrate stories: “It’s not quite drag-and-drop for producers, but it’s super close to that when it comes to the backend.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Report for America wants to place (and help pay for) young reporters in local newsrooms that need them
“This was once something that a whole generation of journalists got to do to start their careers. Sadly, we’ve seen it disappear. We want to restore that tradition.”
Media in the Middle East: A new study shows how the Arab world gets and shares digital news
Two-thirds of respondents in the countries studied said they get news from social media every day.
What We’re Reading
BuzzFeed / Alex Kantrowitz
Twitter now has its own Nuzzel copycat
“Twitter, long an underdog in the social media world, appears to be learning from its much larger rival Facebook, a company that has ruthlessly copied competitors like Snapchat and Houseparty, leading to its informal internal slogan: ‘Don’t be too proud to copy.'”
Poynter / Kristen Hare
Does ‘the business side’ have to be a separate side?
“As we begin talking about what journalists need to learn about the business of journalism, it’s interesting to look at the language we use to describe our non-news colleagues. “The business side” implies there’s more than one side.”
Google Cloud Platform Blog / Apoorv Saxena
Google’s offering some new text-analysis tools publishers might find interesting
“Through predefined content classification, Cloud Natural Language can now automatically sort documents and content into more than 700 different categories, including Arts & Entertainment, Hobbies & Leisure, Law & Government, News, Health, and more. This makes it ideal for industries like media and publishing who’ve traditionally had to manually sort, label and categorize content. Through machine learning with Cloud Natural Language, these companies can now automatically parse the meaning of their articles and content to organize them more efficiently.”
The Drum / Lisa Lacy
How Amazon is becoming the third force in advertising, making the duopoly an oligopoly
“In addition, Hartley noted that advertising is a means to an end for Amazon, which wants to sell more products. For Google, however, advertising is the end ‘because, with few exceptions, they don’t sell anything or make any money off the goods they direct people to via searches.'”
The Guardian / Alex Hern
Apple blocking ads that follow users around web is “sabotage,” says industry
“iOS 11, the latest version of Apple’s operating system for mobile devices…will include a new default feature for the Safari web browser dubbed ‘intelligent tracking prevention,’ which prevents certain websites from tracking users around the net, in effect blocking those annoying ads that follow you everywhere you visit.”
Twitter / glennthrush
The New York Times’ Glenn Thrush has left Twitter
“Too much of a distraction.” He is survived by 348,000 followers, 32,000 tweets, and 7,772 likes.
Columbia Journalism Review / Priyanjana Bengani
What iOS 11 means for news publishers and readers
A look at some of the changes coming to iOS with today’s update.
Axios / Sara Fischer
Live sports audiences are getting older
“The good news: Regional sports networks have had better luck retaining viewers competitor to their national network competitors, reinforcing the importance for fans to see their local teams.”
Google / Simon Rogers
51 percent of news organizations in the U.S. and Europe have a dedicated data journalist
The Google survey also found that 42 percent of reporters use data to tell stories twice or more per week.
Digiday / Jessica Davies
‘We are not going to give up’: German publishers continue war with ad blockers
“It’s one thing if you have users circumventing your idea of how your business works; it’s another thing entirely to have a professional organization earning off that. It’s something we thought as a principle we should do more to address ad blocking now.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.