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After crowdfunding success, Swiss magazine Republik charts a course to “reclaim journalism as a profession”
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After crowdfunding success, Swiss magazine Republik charts a course to “reclaim journalism as a profession”
“We believe people don’t pay for articles anymore. They pay to be part of the community.”
By Christine Schmidt
“We have built the world that they told us existed”: Did the rise of young, white “Internet reporting” bolster the alt-right?
“Nothing has been better for alt-right trolling (whatever that word even means) than establishment journalism.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Flush with spectrum-sale dollars, a Pennsylvania PBS station is doubling down on a different kind of local news
“Our goal is a newscast that is complementary to the commercial news”: Think important local issues, not car crashes and sports scores.
By Christine Schmidt
Can signing a “pro-truth pledge” actually change people’s behavior online?
Plus: Fake audio on WhatsApp in India, and do paywalls lead to increased polarization?
By Laura Hazard Owen
What a 2004 experiment in hyperlocal news can tell us about community voices today
Can a community news platform serve as “technology that protects our minds and replenishes society”?
By Amedeo Tumolillo and Rich Gordon
Is there a big enough global audience interested in China to sustain the South China Morning Post’s ambitious new sites?
With its new verticals Abacus and Inkstone and another on the way, the century-old newspaper is trying to use Alibaba money to build products that both reach a global audience and feel mobile-native.
By Shan Wang
Pear Video produces hundreds of news videos a day across China — with no full-time video journalists
The startup maintains a network of about 30,000 videographers to help source roughly 1,500 videos a day.
By Paloma Almoguera
This program made people better at identifying disinformation. (They still weren’t great at knowing what to trust.)
“Skill for analyzing objective news needs to be developed on its own…it likely needs to be coordinated with the skill for analyzing disinformation-based news.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
What is innovation in local TV news? Andrew Heyward’s new mission is to find out
“It’s a great question because I don’t think we’re suddenly going to come up with some great gimmick and Millennials are going to flock to their TV to watch traditional newscasts.”
By Christine Schmidt
News stories in Europe are predominantly by and about men. Even photograph sizes are unequal.
Across 11 countries studied, 41 percent of bylines were male, 23 percent female.
By Laura Hazard Owen
After crowdfunding success, Swiss magazine Republik charts a course to “reclaim journalism as a profession”
“We believe people don’t pay for articles anymore. They pay to be part of the community.”
By Christine Schmidt
“We have built the world that they told us existed”: Did the rise of young, white “Internet reporting” bolster the alt-right?
“Nothing has been better for alt-right trolling (whatever that word even means) than establishment journalism.”
Flush with spectrum-sale dollars, a Pennsylvania PBS station is doubling down on a different kind of local news
“Our goal is a newscast that is complementary to the commercial news”: Think important local issues, not car crashes and sports scores.
What We’re Reading
Digiday / Max Willens
Publishers try to use mobile ad annoyance as a lure to subscribers
“Publishers hunting for subscribers like to say they’re delivering an experience worth paying for. Increasingly, that’s starting to mean ‘one that has no mobile ads.'”
Bloomberg.com / Gerry Smith
The hard truth at newspapers across America: Hedge funds are in charge
“The evolving ownership picture has sparked fresh questions over whether investment firms can really help save local newspapers by making them profitable again — or if they’ll starve them to the point that they collapse instead.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Pete Vernon
“The Fourth Estate” shows how far The New York Times has come
“There’s a much more upbeat sense, partly because our economics are better, partly because — remarkably — the newsroom is actually a little bigger than it was in 2010.”
TechCrunch / Sarah Perez
Reese Witherspoon’s Hello Sunshine teams with Amazon’s Audible on audiobooks and originals
“The collaboration will initially see the launch of a showcase of Audible audiobooks as selected by Reese’s Book Club, which focus on strong but complex female characters. However, the two companies said that further down the line Hello Sunshine Witherspoon and Amazon-owned Audible will work together on original audio productions, details of which will be announced later in the year.”
The New York Times Company
The New York Times is launching a parenting product with Jessica Grose as editor-in-chief
“We’ve shown that we can create non-news products that add significant value to our business. Cooking and Crosswords are both fast-growing stand-alone subscription businesses, contributing a large number of new subscribers to The Times each quarter. Cooking and Crosswords are also included in our highest priced subscription option. When we added these valuable offerings to our bundle last year, we saw a jump in people subscribing at higher price points.”
Digiday / Lucia Moses
Why The New York Times likes short-run newsletters
“People like signing up for them because it’s a short-term commitment, and it’s something they’re passionate about right now.”
The Guardian / Alex Hern
Most GDPR consent renewal emails are unnecessary, and some even illegal, experts say
“The first question to ask is: which of the six legal grounds under the GDPR should you rely on to process personal data? Consent is only one ground. The others are contract, legal obligation, vital interests, public interest and legitimate interests. Even if you are relying on consent, that still does not mean you have to ask for consent again. Recital 171 of the GDPR makes clear you can continue to rely on any existing consent that was given in line with the GDPR requirements, and there’s no need to seek fresh consent. Just make sure that your consent met the GDPR standard and that consents are properly documented.”
Bloomberg.com / Leonid Bershidsky
How media paywalls work in authoritarian countries
“The reach of paid independent news sites is dwarfed by Putin’s state-owned propaganda media and the websites owned by businesspeople who are loyal to the Kremlin. The main page of RIA Novosti, the state propaganda agency, had an average of 4 million unique visitors a day in April. Outlets like this don’t need subscription revenue to survive.”
Wall Street Journal / Lukas Alpert
Politico is partnering with South China Morning Post to expand its Asia coverage
“The venture will start as a content-sharing partnership involving joint projects between the editorial operations of each publication. If all goes well, the companies intend to further develop editorial ties and business initiatives with the possibility of deeper financial investment on both sides. Initially, Politico doesn’t plan to hire any additional staff.“
The New York Times / Sridhar Pappu and Jay Stowe
The Last Days of Time Inc.
“An oral history of how the pre-eminent media organization of the 20th century ended up on the scrap heap.”
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