Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
The Information’s new Briefing is a continuous update of opinionated takes on other people’s articles
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
The Information’s new Briefing is a continuous update of opinionated takes on other people’s articles
Briefing is meant to be more Politico Playbook than Techmeme. It’s updated around the clock, but is also being sent out as a daily email newsletter for subscribers.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Gabfest, explainer, local, The Daily: A taxonomy of news podcasts
Plus: Edison offers up more podcast listener data, DeRay Mckesson teams up with Crooked Media, and Bill O’Reilly clings to his podcast.
By Nicholas Quah
This is a news publication all about the working life — but it’s housed within a job search company
14-year-old online job search company Ladders has hired journalists to bolster and burnish its editorial operation, which will try to cover everything from policy to pop culture (as it relates to work, of course).
By Shan Wang
Newsonomics: Lydia Polgreen’s ambitious HuffPost remake aims for “solidarity” among readers
“Mobility is a crucial factor in our identity. I believe that sort of fundamental optimism of American identity is running out of gas…That fundamentally shifts our national character.”
By Ken Doctor
In a redesign, The Huffington Post (now just HuffPost) doubles down on its “equalizing tabloid” roots
“The splash is really the best of our editorial voice…In thinking about who we are, this is the best reflection of it from a product perspective.”
By Shan Wang
Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales launches Wikitribune, a large-scale attempt to combat fake news
The crowd-funded news platform aims to combat fake news by combining professional journalism with volunteer fact checking: “news by the people and for the people.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
What’s holding back virtual reality news? Slow tech adoption, monetization, and yes, dull content
“I’m afraid that more and more people in news organizations use 360 for stories that are not interesting. Bad content will keep people away from watching it.”
By Ricardo Bilton
The New York Times brings its (even briefer) morning briefings to Snapchat Discover
Staffers insist the Times won’t pander to its Discover audience, but the morning briefing is being reenvisioned as a quick 300-word scan.
By Laura Hazard Owen
With Open Notebook, Hearken wants to help news orgs do more of their reporting in public
“I don’t think earning trust is something you do once and just bank on for a long time.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Jeff Israely: What comes next in the Uberization of the news business?
“Ours is a system that neither Adam Smith nor Karl Marx — not even Travis Kalanick — can figure out for us.”
By Jeff Israely
Stat is publishing a print section in Sunday’s Boston Globe — and it might be coming to a paper near you
The health and life sciences site is in talks with other newspapers about republishing its coverage in print.
By Joseph Lichterman
A new database of fake news sites details how much fakery has spread from Trump v. Clinton to local news
Plus: The New York Times walks back an extremely popular tweet, California adds media literacy to its curriculum, and the KIND Foundation tries out a “Pop Your Bubble” app that nobody is going to want to use.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Nieman Lab is looking for more stories of digital innovation outside the U.S., and we’d love your help
Have ideas for things we should cover? Want to help us cover them? Want to help us translate stories so that they reach more people? Join our new Slack community!
By Nieman Lab Staff
The Financial Times started a mergers and acquisitions newsletter for its highest-paying subscribers
“We want to draw people’s attention to the fact that we cover the entire totality of a deal with the same aggression that we would try to get a scoop.”
By Joseph Lichterman
The Information’s new Briefing is a continuous update of opinionated takes on other people’s articles
Briefing is meant to be more Politico Playbook than Techmeme. It’s updated around the clock, but is also being sent out as a daily email newsletter for subscribers.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Gabfest, explainer, local, The Daily: A taxonomy of news podcasts
Plus: Edison offers up more podcast listener data, DeRay Mckesson teams up with Crooked Media, and Bill O’Reilly clings to his podcast.
This is a news publication all about the working life — but it’s housed within a job search company
14-year-old online job search company Ladders has hired journalists to bolster and burnish its editorial operation, which will try to cover everything from policy to pop culture (as it relates to work, of course).
What We’re Reading
The Information / Alfred Lee
Facebook is testing new discovery tools for news
“[One] idea, which would likely expand beyond news to other types of content, is a discovery tab within Facebook’s app that would surface new articles or videos from pages that users don’t already follow.”
Univision
You’ll soon be seeing more Nieman Lab stories translated into Spanish
Thanks to our new partnership with Univision News! (You can find all of our Spanish-language stories here — many more to come.)
The Information / Cory Weinberg
Quora’s CEO says regulators could clamp down on Facebook and Twitter
“You need to make readers of the platforms more aware of the true source of their news. They click a link and last time they went to that source, there’s not enough information about what source you’re going to. Government regulation at some point is a real option.” (Also, Quora’s CEO pops up in the comments.)
Poynter / Alexios Mantzarlis
Google has strengthened the feedback tool that lets users alert the company to featured errors
“Google also announced an update to the guidelines for quality raters — people asked to evaluate search results on an ongoing basis — that includes language on flagging hoaxes, misinformation and conspiracy theories as low-quality results. The most visible change for everyday users, however, is the expanded feedback option on autocomplete suggestions and the featured snippets.”
TechCrunch / Josh Constine
Facebook begins testing a related articles widget before you open a link, which includes articles by fact-checkers
“If you saw a link saying ‘Chocolate cures cancer!’ from a little-known blog, the Related Article box might appear before you click to show links from the New York Times or a medical journal noting that while chocolate has antioxidants that can lower your risk for cancer, it’s not a cure.”
Webby Awards
These are the winners of this year’s Webby Awards
News-related winners include NPR, The Ringer, FiveThirtyEight, BuzzFeed, Gimlet Media, The New York Times, and Clickhole. (There are roughly ∞ Webby Award categories.)
Digiday / Ross Benes
Publishers say Facebook can save Instant Articles with better data and subscription tools
“If IA monetization doesn’t dramatically improve, high quality publishers will continue to pull out. There’s just no reason for publishers to continue to lose money on IA this far after launch.”
Adweek / Lauren Johnson
The Washington Post is guaranteeing that all of its online ads will load in under 2 seconds
“The Post’s technology identifies ads that are too heavy to load and instead serves a promo that doesn’t gobble up data from a consumer’s phone plan. Zeus can also detect how fast someone is scrolling so that ads only load when they’re about to come into view. If someone is scrolling too fast, Zeus pulls back from serving an ad.”
Poynter / Kate Steiker-Ginzberg
Fact-checking booms in Brazil
More than 40 journalists are now working full-time or part-time on dedicated fact-checking projects in Brazil, a dramatic expansion of resources compared to previous efforts.
The New York Times / Farhad Manjoo
Can Facebook fix its own worst bug?
“Across the globe, Facebook now seems to benefit actors who want to undermine the global vision at its foundation. Supporters of Trump and the European right-wing nationalists who aim to turn their nations inward and dissolve alliances, trolls sowing cross-border paranoia, even ISIS with its skillful social-media recruiting and propagandizing — all of them have sought in their own ways to split the Zuckerbergian world apart. And they are using his own machine to do it.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.