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Business realities are impacting all college newspapers. But what happens when they’re for-profit?
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Business realities are impacting all college newspapers. But what happens when they’re for-profit?
Gannett owns two college newspapers in Florida — it’s closed one and cutting costs at the other.
By Joseph Lichterman
Where does local TV news fit in the digital age? Tegna, a year separated from Gannett, has some ideas
“By following the lead of our employees to create content that is digital first, it frees them up from the sameness of format that is plaguing local television news.”
By Shan Wang
Report: The New York Times is expanding to Australia and Canada
Having faced some difficulties with an earlier era’s attempts in large non-English markets, the Times is turning its focus next to more familiar territory.
By Joseph Lichterman
Hot Pod: Can a political podcast avoid being overtaken by events?
Plus: Vox Media’s making moves in audio, more podcast/broadcast partnerships, and the importance of sound design.
By Nicholas Quah
Why this Mexican sports site is experimenting with as many new story formats as it can
From Facebook-only verticals to Telegram bots to an in-house Snapchat imitator, Juanfutbol is trying to thread the needle between social distribution and site loyalty.
By Joseph Lichterman
It’s time to apply for a Knight Visiting Nieman Fellowship
The Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard wants to hear your idea for making journalism better. Come spend a few weeks working on it in Cambridge. Deadline: October 14.
By Ann Marie Lipinski
Fusion’s newsletter strategy trades automated feeds for human curation and reporters’ voices
“There’s a thematic through-line and a coherence that you get from reading the intro and the email all the way through. This is not something you’re going to create by just sending out a email RSS feed or using an algorithm.”
By Ricardo Bilton
What it takes to manage a daily popup Snapchat channel from the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio
A dozen producers from BuzzFeed are working around the clock to curate the channel, with access to NBC footage.
By Shan Wang
“It’s a little bit of a crazy concept”: Three women’s newsletters on the decline of the glossy magazine
How the perceived lack of authenticity in women’s magazines is leading readers (and writers) to personal newsletters.
By Taylyn Washington-Harmon
Business realities are impacting all college newspapers. But what happens when they’re for-profit?
Gannett owns two college newspapers in Florida — it’s closed one and cutting costs at the other.
By Joseph Lichterman
Where does local TV news fit in the digital age? Tegna, a year separated from Gannett, has some ideas
“By following the lead of our employees to create content that is digital first, it frees them up from the sameness of format that is plaguing local television news.”
Report: The New York Times is expanding to Australia and Canada
Having faced some difficulties with an earlier era’s attempts in large non-English markets, the Times is turning its focus next to more familiar territory.
What We’re Reading
The New York Times / Andrei Kallaur
Putting {Style} into the online New York Times stylebook
“I started to reimagine and redesign the Stylebook as a fully responsive web app — one that could be used on any device, regardless of platform. Along the way, I considered the importance of search, ease of use, and of course, typographic elegance.”
Poynter / Benjamin Mullin
The New York Times is launching digital-first teams to cover gender, education, and climate change
“We already have a few digital-first departments, but none of them has primary responsibility for covering major news,” wrote Dean Baquet in a memo on Friday. “These new teams will have such responsibilities and, as a result, will become models for the newsroom of the near future.”
Katie Couric Podcast
Why a New York Times editor quit (and then rejoined) Twitter
“What I find offensive is Twitter can wear the halo of a terms of service that says we don’t put up with harassment, we don’t put up with racism or anti-Semitism…but then don’t do anything to police it.”
Bloomberg / Sarah Frier
Twitter is said to be working on an anti-harrassment keyword filtering tool
By using keywords, users could block swear words or racial slurs, for example, to screen out offenders, according to sources (the initiative isn’t yet public).
Politico / Ken Doctor
Tronc considers a sweetened purchase offer from Gannett
“For four months, Tronc – the company formerly known as Tribune Publishing, parent of The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune among other similarly august titles in smaller markets – has steadfastly and publicly rejected the hostile takeover intentions of USA Today parent company Gannett. But a recent quiet renewed offer from Gannett – its third – at a higher price point has Tronc moving forward with a counteroffer.”
Poynter / Benjamin Mullin
George Washington University students are launching a media reporting site
“I realized that with American Journalism Review closing last year, there are no outlets completely dedicated to media news and media criticism in the D.C. area,” said the forthcoming publication MediaFile’s new editor-in-chief Scott Nover, a senior journalism major at GWU.
WWD / Alexandra Steigrad
Condé Nast is rumored to be considering a shakeup to its publisher structure
Like many legacy publishers, it’s steering the business from print-centric roots to a digital future. According to sources, management is toying with the idea of either grouping publishers by category or reducing its roster of 13 or so publishers down to about six.
the Guardian / Juliette Garside
EU proposals could see news publishers paid by Google and Facebook
“The measures are part of a series of reforms that the European commission plans to put out to consultation in September. They are designed to strengthen the rights of those who create and invest in original content, from authors and musicians to record labels, broadcasters and publishers.”
Journalism.co.uk / Madalina Ciobanu
The Daily Vox is training young reporters to “establish new traditions” in South African journalism
“We are working towards establishing new traditions in journalism and incubating the talent of these young people, many of whom have no former journalism training.”
New York / Brian Feldman
The rise of video is making 2016 a weird year to be a digital publisher
“Selling display ads — banner ads and other advertisements you see alongside articles on websites in your browser — is no longer really lucrative enough to support a business. At the same time, sponsored ads — article-like pieces of content that are created at the behest, and with the input of, brands — haven’t been able to replace them. So what’s next? Video ads. And to sell video ads, you need video.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.