Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
The New York Times’ Mark Thompson on how he’d run a local newspaper: “Where can we stand and fight?”
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
The New York Times’ Mark Thompson on how he’d run a local newspaper: “Where can we stand and fight?”
“I believe that if you’re producing journalism of value, there is no reason to expect that consumers wouldn’t be prepared, in some way, to support that — potentially to pay for it. And that’s probably, ultimately, true of regional and local journalism as well as national and international journalism.”
By Ken Doctor
Newsonomics: Can The New York Times avoid a Trump Slump and sign up 10 million paying subscribers?
And what lessons can the rest of the industry draw from the Times’ outsized success?
By Ken Doctor
How Your Voice Ohio worked with Youngstown’s WFMJ to highlight solutions in the opioid crisis
“If it’s half of what we think it could be, then everyone here is going to reach more people with this subject of such critical importance here.”
By Christine Schmidt
While YouTube and Facebook fumble, Pinterest is reducing health misinformation in ways that actually make sense
Plus: Big advertisers ban YouTube (not over vaccines), the National Cancer Institute wonders how to respond to health misinformation, and how to fill a data void.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Flipboard wants tighter abs, Pinterest wants good wine, and Linkedin wants to read about…shopping? Here are the kinds of content platform users seek (or avoid)
Also: Drudge Report readers are some of longform’s biggest fans, Instagram users are worried about their credit limit, and Facebook users would love more stories about pregnancy, please.
By Kelsey Arendt
How News 12 is working with ProPublica’s Documenting Hate database to track local hate crimes
“Getting things on air will reach the audience you’re looking to reach. Getting things online is important so people can find the work later.”
By Christine Schmidt
The state of women in U.S. media in 2019: Still f’ing abysmal — especially at Reuters and the AP
“The media is in a state of great disruption, but despite all the change, one thing remains the same: fewer women report the news than men.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Local TV is still the most trusted source of news. So how do you collaborate with a station?
“The idea that you would collaborate with your competitor when you’re fighting for ratings is anathema to broadcasters.” But it may be a key part of how local news remains sustainable.
By Christine Schmidt
How Tribune Publishing, The Guardian, and Slate tackled reader revenue by valuing their journalism more
Exclusive podcasts, tightened paywalls, and just plain asking each played a part.
By Christine Schmidt
How the Lenfest Local Lab used texting to inform Philadelphians about election issues
Texting “seemed like a way to allow people to pare the constant stream of news down to just what mattered to them the most.”
By Sarah Schmalbach
It’s time for a “radical shift in the balance of power between the platforms and the people,” the British parliament says
Facebook acts like “digital gangsters,” “Mark Zuckerberg has shown contempt” toward governments, and the company’s “deliberate” strategy was to send uninformed executives to answer Parliament’s questions.
By Laura Hazard Owen
So is Spotify now the inevitable next King of Podcasts? Or will it struggle, like everyone else, to get past Apple?
Plus: The U.K. wants to open up funding for independent audio, Newt Gingrich gets his own World, and a new show about being a working mother.
By Nicholas Quah
“Rebuilding a local news ecosystem”: Knight pledges $300 million to local news, free speech, and media literacy organizations
Among the grantees: The American Journalism Project gets $20 million, Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press gets $10 million, and The News Literacy Project gets $5 million. And there’s more, lots more.
By Laura Hazard Owen
How can local TV news fix its young person problem? Maybe it needs to look more like Vox
“While remixing the stories did not resonate every time, we did see positive results on the group of hard news stories where we altered the storytelling approach.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
If Facebook wants to stop the spread of anti-vaxxers, it could start by not taking their ad dollars
“You have nothing to be ashamed of for your parents not vaccinating you. It wasn’t something you researched and decided against, you were just doing the whole ‘being a kid’ thing.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
The New York Times’ Mark Thompson on how he’d run a local newspaper: “Where can we stand and fight?”
“I believe that if you’re producing journalism of value, there is no reason to expect that consumers wouldn’t be prepared, in some way, to support that — potentially to pay for it. And that’s probably, ultimately, true of regional and local journalism as well as national and international journalism.”
By Ken Doctor
Newsonomics: Can The New York Times avoid a Trump Slump and sign up 10 million paying subscribers?
And what lessons can the rest of the industry draw from the Times’ outsized success?
How Your Voice Ohio worked with Youngstown’s WFMJ to highlight solutions in the opioid crisis
“If it’s half of what we think it could be, then everyone here is going to reach more people with this subject of such critical importance here.”
What We’re Reading
Miami New Times / Chuck Strouse
More than 200 McClatchy employees take buyouts (out of the 450 offered)
“In a letter that left several longtime employees shaking their heads, CEO Craig Forman wrote that ‘these efforts are building the future of our company, and its role in our communities — and in the future of our republic.'”
YouTube / Arthur W. Page Center
Dean Baquet responds to Trump’s anti-New York Times tweet
“Enemy of the people is not just a tossed-off line that sounds good in a tweet. It is a particularly pernicious phrase with a deep history…No president has ever uttered those words in public.”
Bloomberg / Gerry Smith
How The New York Times approaches finding subscribers outside its typical markets
“‘We tend to have a subscriber base broadly that’s skewed to urban areas,’ Times Chief Operating Officer Meredith Kopit Levien said. ‘The interesting thing about [the paid NYT Cooking app] is its audience and subscriber base tend to be the opposite.'”
Nieman Reports / Gabriella Schwartz
Why tech platforms need to be built on journalistic values
“One of the risks for the tech industry that values what’s new, who’s hot, and what’s next is a failure to draw on knowledge gained through experience and the people who hold the keys to that knowledge. If a company has the potential to disrupt, then it must understand the industry it could purposefully or accidentally upend. Tech platforms failed to do this with journalism, and we as a society are paying the price.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Mathew Ingram
Google says it’s fighting misinformation, but how hard?
“Facebook continues to get the bulk of the press (mostly bad) for its role in helping to weaponize misinformation networks during the 2016 election and elsewhere, but Google’s search and recommendation algorithms arguably have more impact—it’s just not as visible or as obvious as Facebook’s.”
Mashable / Karissa Bell
Twitter opens a beta program to test new conversation features
After Jack Dorsey and Kara Swisher’s Twitter chat devolved, the company is testing “redesigned threads that use color-coded labels and a chat bubble-style design, nested replies that make it easier to track offshoots of a particular conversation, replies that hide like and retweet counts behind an additional menu.”
Longform / Max Linsky
HuffPost EIC Lydia Polgreen: “If Hillary Clinton had won the election, I have a feeling that I would still be a mid-level manager at The New York Times”
“But after the election, I really started to think about journalism, about my role in it, about who journalism was serving and who it was for, and I just became really enamored with this idea that you could create a news organization that was less about people who are left out of the political and economic power equations, but actually for them.”
Global Investigative Journalism Network / Breno Costa
“Like a punk rock band”: How The Intercept built out its local investigative branch
“We have this goal of training journalism readers — open-minded young people, who aren’t attached to old dogmas. The crowdfunding also brought us closer to them through the creation of a private group on Facebook.”
Press Gazette / Charlotte Tobitt
The U.K.’s “fake news unit” secures funding to continue its battle against disinformation
“When the Times reported last year that murder rates in London had outstripped those in New York for the first time, the RRU took action to “prevent panic” in the face of what it said were ‘alarmist news stories’.”
Digiday / Tim Peterson
What podcast advertisers are thinking about
“People are not always rushing to listen to the latest episode of their favorite podcasts. For ESPN’s documentary series ’30 for 30 Podcasts,’ 65 percent of episode downloads happened more than a week after the episode was released, according to ESPN senior writer Ramona Shelburne.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.