Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Stat launches a $299/year subscription with original content, events, and a private Slack group
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Stat launches a $299/year subscription with original content, events, and a private Slack group
“It was a high bar to just get out there and get people out there to know us and read us.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Hot Pod: Macmillan’s new network shows how podcasts can be a logical next step for book publishers
Plus: “The number of potential distribution points for on-demand audio is kinda getting out of hand.”
By Nicholas Quah
Newsonomics: The New York Times is setting its sights on 10 million digital subscribers
The branded content business, meanwhile, isn’t growing as strongly as projected.
By Ken Doctor
Voice of San Diego is spearheading a team to help other smaller news outlets build membership programs
The centralized News Revenue Hub is helping a pilot group of five news organizations — Honolulu Civil Beat, InsideClimate News, The Lens, NJ Spotlight, and PolitiFact — with everything from technical installation to email targeting.
By Shan Wang
With VuHaus, public music stations hope collaboration will bring in more listeners (and money) online
“NPR’s capacity is really in news and the spoken word, and it’s very active on the cultural side, but not organized around music. There was a sense we either needed to work with each other or have a hard time competing at all.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Could email newsletters be a partial solution to magazine companies’ problems? (Toronto Life thinks so)
Following the success of Twelve Thirty Six, Toronto Life is looking more closely at email newsletters as standalone products.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Coda Story, focused on deep dives around single themes, is now tackling a “post-truth” Eurasia
The platform is focusing on two major themes — disinformation campaigns in Eurasia and the migrant crisis in Germany — and focusing on larger character-driven narratives.
By Shan Wang
The premise of Jim VandeHei’s new media venture: People who care about real news are now a niche
“I believe very powerfully in the public service of journalism — I just think we have to quit being delusional about what it takes to build a business around that.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Reuters built its own algorithmic prediction tool to help it spot (and verify) breaking news on Twitter
“The world has a lot more witnesses now, and we can’t be at everything. Our tool helps shift some of the burden of witnessing and lets journalists do much more of the high value-added work.”
By Ricardo Bilton
The Tulsa Frontier is ditching its pricey paywall and becoming a nonprofit as it attempts to grow
The Oklahoma-based investigative site had about 750 subscribers paying $30 a month.
By Joseph Lichterman
Stat launches a $299/year subscription with original content, events, and a private Slack group
“It was a high bar to just get out there and get people out there to know us and read us.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Hot Pod: Macmillan’s new network shows how podcasts can be a logical next step for book publishers
Plus: “The number of potential distribution points for on-demand audio is kinda getting out of hand.”
Newsonomics: The New York Times is setting its sights on 10 million digital subscribers
The branded content business, meanwhile, isn’t growing as strongly as projected.
What We’re Reading
BuzzFeed / Craig Silverman
Shorenstein Center
Shorenstein: Press failed the voters in the 2016 election
“The real bias of the press is not that it’s liberal. Its bias is a decided preference for the negative.”
TechCrunch / Lora Kolodny
Hacker News calls for “political detox,” critics cry censorship
“Political conflicts cause harm here. The values of Hacker News are intellectual curiosity and thoughtful conversation. Those things are lost when political emotions seize control.”
Motherboard / Jason Koebler
Meet the last of the machinists who keep The New York Times running
“We visited the Times to meet Zerafa, Greaney, and Chris Bedetto, who are part of a team of machinists that keeps the New York Times’s eight three-story printing presses humming. On weekdays, the facility prints roughly 300,000 copies nightly; on weekends, it prints around a million.”
The Verge / Kyle Chayka
How Facebook Instant Articles and Google AMP help camouflage fake news
“The fake news problem we’re facing isn’t just about articles gaining traffic from Facebook timelines or Google search results. It’s also an issue of news literacy — a reader’s ability to discern credible news. And it’s getting harder to tell on sight alone which sites are trustworthy. On a Facebook timeline or Google search feed, every story comes prepackaged in the same skin, whether it’s a months-long investigation from The Washington Post or completely fabricated clickbait.”
Adweek / Richard Horgan
Paste is trying to return to print
It’s looking to raise $100,000 in an Indiegogo campaign for to launch a quarterly print magazine this spring
The Wall Street Journal / Resty Woro Yuniar and Liza Lin
In Southeast Asia, Facebook and Instagram are where people shop
“About 30% of online sales in Southeast Asia—a region with 150 million digital consumers—were done through social networks in 2016, estimates consultancy firm Bain & Co. That compares with just 7% of the roughly 287 million internet users that are likely to buy from social networks in the U.S., according to London-based market research firm GlobalWebIndex.”
The Wall Street Journal / Steven Perlberg
Tinder launches a podcast with Gimlet Creative that’s backed by dating data
“The new show is called “DTR,” short for “define the relationship” (the anxiety-inducing conversation where two millennials mutually agree on the degree to which things are casual or serious). The six-part series, hosted by journalist and “This American Life” music supervisor Jane Marie, covers various topics surrounding dating in the digital age, like how to best construct an online profile or the precarious transfer of nude photographs.”
Folio: / Becky Peterson
Bloomberg Pursuits ends print magazine
“The digital edition will live on, and online content will remain free to all audiences. In addition, the October-launched show “Bloomberg Pursuits” will continue to air on Bloomberg TV, and luxury reports will continue on Bloomberg Radio. No personnel changes are expected at this time.”
Digiday / Lucia Moses
Seeking a competitive edge, publishers rethink integrated print-digital staffs
“In the early days of the web, print publishers had digital operations that were separate from their print teams, and often considered second-class; understandable, considering most of their money was and is still being made on print. Over time, most newsrooms integrated their print and digital operations. They’re not abandoning the mantra of integration; that’s a luxury few can afford anyway. But recent moves reflect a growing recognition that each channel has its distinct needs.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.