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Is it finally time for media companies to adopt a common publishing platform?
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Is it finally time for media companies to adopt a common publishing platform?
Media companies are each independently trying to solve the same technical problems, rather than focusing on competing with Facebook. Is the usual answer to “buy or build?” changing?
By Jesse Knight
New limited-run podcasts are fun to listen to, but hard to sell. Can that change?
Plus: How the BBC is decentralizing political podcasting, and the battle of the Thanksgiving afternoon podcasts.
By Nicholas Quah
Polarizing the network: The most interesting new digital and social media research
Journalist’s Resource sifts through the academic journals so you don’t have to. Here’s their latest roundup, including research into how Twitter impacts reporters’ news judgment, how often we remember where we read something, and why Facebook makes you feel bad.
By Denise-Marie Ordway
Why covering the environment is one of the most dangerous beats in journalism
“In both wealthy and developing countries, journalists covering these issues find themselves in the cross-hairs. Most survive, but many undergo severe trauma, with profound effects on their careers.”
By Eric Freedman
The Boston Globe seeks a contact high from the spread of marijuana legalization
With its new vertical on cannabis, the Globe joins a budding list of local news outlets seeking to build audience via legal pot.
By Joshua Benton
If you hate the media, you’re more likely to be fooled by a fake headline
You’re also more likely to confuse news and opinion — but more likely to think you never need any help finding accurate information online, thankyouverymuch.
By Joshua Benton
Notifications every 2 minutes: This in-depth look at how people really use WhatsApp shows why fighting fake news there is so hard
“In India, citizens actively seem to be privileging breadth of information over depth…Indians at this moment are not themselves articulating any kind of anxiety about dealing with the flood of information in their phones.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Facebook probably didn’t want to be denying it paid people to create fake news this week, but here we are
Plus: WhatsApp pays for misinformation research and a look at fake midterm-related accounts (“heavy on memes, light on language”).
By Laura Hazard Owen
How The Wall Street Journal is preparing its journalists to detect deepfakes
“We have seen this rapid rise in deep learning technology and the question is: Is that going to keep going, or is it plateauing? What’s going to happen next?”
By Francesco Marconi and Till Daldrup
Consumers love smart speakers. They don’t love news on smart speakers. (At least not yet.)
People are still much more likely to use smart speakers for music and weather than news. But that could change as news organizations design news briefings specifically for the speakers.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Is it finally time for media companies to adopt a common publishing platform?
Media companies are each independently trying to solve the same technical problems, rather than focusing on competing with Facebook. Is the usual answer to “buy or build?” changing?
By Jesse Knight
New limited-run podcasts are fun to listen to, but hard to sell. Can that change?
Plus: How the BBC is decentralizing political podcasting, and the battle of the Thanksgiving afternoon podcasts.
Polarizing the network: The most interesting new digital and social media research
Journalist’s Resource sifts through the academic journals so you don’t have to. Here’s their latest roundup, including research into how Twitter impacts reporters’ news judgment, how often we remember where we read something, and why Facebook makes you feel bad.
What We’re Reading
Washington Post / Margaret Sullivan
Embattled and in over his head, Mark Zuckerberg should — at least — step down as Facebook chairman
“If Zuckerberg really wants to be ‘responsible for what happened here,’ he’ll step aside as chairman and encourage some stringent internal oversight. And, as part of that, true transparency to the public and the press.”
Pacific Standard / Sophie Yeo
Why the decline of newspapers is bad for the environment
“New research suggests that corporations pollute more when there aren’t local papers to hold them accountable.”
Washington Post / Philip Bump
Cable news networks spend far more time talking about hurricanes than wildfires
“The Camp Fire is the deadliest fire in the history of California. On Fox News and MSNBC, the peak density of coverage through Sunday has never matched the lowest density of coverage on those networks in the first two weeks after the formation of Hurricane Irma in 2017.”
New York Times / Jaclyn Peiser
Glamour magazine to cease regular print publication
“Although the number of Glamour’s paid subscribers has remained stable over the last three years, at around 2.2 million, [Samantha] Barry said it was time for the publication to break away from the printed page.”
CNN / Kaya Yurieff
Instagram tries to crack down on fake likes, follows, and comments
“Instagram said it built machine learning tools to help detect and remove fake popularity boosting. Users can sign up for such services by providing their username and password in exchange for more likes and followers. These services use bots that leave comments and like posts on real Instagram accounts, often for a fee.”
New York Times / Jolie Kerr
How to talk to people, according to Terry Gross
“The beauty in opening with ‘tell me about yourself’ is that it allows you to start a conversation without the fear that you’re going to inadvertently make someone uncomfortable or self-conscious. Posing a broad question lets people lead you to who they are.”
Business Insider / Bryan Logan
How Blavity is redefining the media world by helping African-American millennials “tell their own story”
Blavity “closed a $6.5 million Series A round with Google Ventures in July, bringing its total venture investment so far to $8.5 million. That’s an almost of unheard-of amount of money for an early-stage, black-owned startup, much less a new digital publication — especially one with a young, black, female CEO, Morgan DeBaun, Samuels’ cofounder.”
Vox / Ezra Klein
The case for slowing everything down a bit
“Our digital lives dispense with friction. We get the answers we seek instantly, we keep up with friends without speaking to them, we get the news as it happens, we watch loops of videos an algorithm chose for us, we click once and get any product in the world delivered to our doorsteps in less than two days.”
Digiday / Tim Peterson
Quartz forms Quartz AI Studio with $250k grant from Knight Foundation
“Quartz will use the $249,000 grant from the Knight Foundation to hire a developer and a producer to join the Quartz AI Studio alongside John Keefe, technical architect for bots and machine learning at Quartz. Quartz expects to make those hires in time to begin working on stories in January, said Keefe.”
Poynter / Rick Edmonds
ASNE diversity survey: meager participation but progress among those reporting
“Some told me that they have been barely able to hire the last five years and were… embarrassed to show their numbers.” Among 1,700 organizations surveyed, 293 responded, far below the 661 organizations that returned surveys last year.
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.