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The Appeal focuses on an often undercovered aspect of criminal justice: local prosecutors
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The Appeal focuses on an often undercovered aspect of criminal justice: local prosecutors
The site, recently rebranded from In Justice Today, wants to shine a light on a more mysterious part of the legal system by focusing on local prosecutors and criminal justice policy.
By Marlee Baldridge
These are the three types of bias that explain all the fake news, pseudoscience, and other junk in your News Feed
Indiana University researchers “have found that steep competition for users’ limited attention means that some ideas go viral despite their low quality — even when people prefer to share high-quality content.”
By Giovanni Luca Ciampaglia and Filippo Menczer
Newsonomics: GateHouse’s Mike Reed talks about rolling up America’s news industry
“Content is our number-one priority,” Reed said. But he’s unwilling to publicly commit to any new level of funding or staffing to meet that goal.
By Ken Doctor
Newsonomics: GateHouse Media thinks services for small local businesses can help replace long-gone advertising
“We’re never going to beat Google and Facebook in advertising. Let’s focus on what we can beat them at, and that’s being local and selling business owners something that they need terribly.”
By Ken Doctor
Could Google’s new podcast app change the way we understand the Average Podcast Listener?
“It’s pretty damn hard to listen to a podcast, so the kinds of folks who listen to them regularly must really love the thing enough to walk on coals. Google’s new AI-assisted features are designed to cut down the necessity of that intensity.”
By Nicholas Quah
How to end misogyny in the news industry: An open letter to the international journalism community
“We are done pandering to the egos of change-resistant influential men in the hope that our gentle lead will eventually encourage them to join us on a meander toward gender equality in the news business.”
By An Open Letter
Newsonomics: McCormick Media’s back in the Tronc game, as eyes turn to the TRNC ticker
What will happen to the price of Tronc shares as investors, a good number of speculators among them, assess the post-L.A. Times value of a major daily newspaper chain effectively halved in the deal?
By Ken Doctor
What news leaders learned at the 2018 Institute for Nonprofit News conference
Finding funding and telling stories that sell were the two big topics at the conference.
By Marlee Baldridge
With its Facebook Watch news show, Alabama’s Reckon wants to make a national audience care about local news
More Facebook Watch news shows are on the way — but is the effort worth it for all local publishers?
By Christine Schmidt
There’s a big difference between the number of people who worry about fake news and who say they’ve actually seen it
Plus: Facebook looks to hire “news credibility specialists,” and Reuters tries to figure out if highly partisan sites are gaining traction in and outside the U.S. (it looks as if they’re not).
By Laura Hazard Owen
The Appeal focuses on an often undercovered aspect of criminal justice: local prosecutors
The site, recently rebranded from In Justice Today, wants to shine a light on a more mysterious part of the legal system by focusing on local prosecutors and criminal justice policy.
By Marlee Baldridge
These are the three types of bias that explain all the fake news, pseudoscience, and other junk in your News Feed
Indiana University researchers “have found that steep competition for users’ limited attention means that some ideas go viral despite their low quality — even when people prefer to share high-quality content.”
Newsonomics: GateHouse’s Mike Reed talks about rolling up America’s news industry
“Content is our number-one priority,” Reed said. But he’s unwilling to publicly commit to any new level of funding or staffing to meet that goal.
What We’re Reading
Wall Street Journal / Benjamin Mullin
WordPress.com parent company buys Atavist, a maker of subscription-focused publishing software
“The deal encompasses Atavist’s proprietary content management system, its customer base and the Atavist Magazine. Atavist’s primary product is a publishing software platform with free and paid tiers. The free version allows users to create their own home pages and build multimedia stories; the paid tiers allow users to launch paywalls, collect subscription fees and sell individual stories. The software has more than 200,000 users, but only a ‘small percentage’ pay for premium versions.”
Co.Design / Mark Wilson
The Weather Channel brought a tornado to life with hyper-realistic graphics in the name of “immersive storytelling”
“We wanted to do something that would bring [weather stories] to our audience in a strong and memorable way,” says Michael Potts, VP of design at the Weather Channel. “We want great moments. We want to engage our audience, and we want our content to be shareable.”
Solution Set / Joseph Lichterman
Should publishers raise prices on subscribers who use adblockers?
“AP reporter Ryan Nakashima wanted to know if readers would be willing to pay more for an ad-free news experience, so he partnered with the Bay Area News Group and created a modal that required readers who were using an adblocker to purchase a subscription or turn off their adblocker. Based on the experiment, Nakashima recommended that publishers should charge ad-blocking subscribers an extra $1 or $2 per month.”
The Guardian / Jim Waterson
The Guardian, News UK, and the Telegraph are launching a joint advertising business
The Ozone Project, launching in the fall, will allow potential advertisers to buy online ad space across news titles the Guardian, the Times, the Sun, and the Telegraph from one single site. The deal involves only digital advertising, and all the newspaper groups will continue to have their own independent sales teams, who will compete against against each other for business. There will be no sharing of editorial content or data.
Digiday / Brian Morrissey
The Financial Times: We stopped advertising on Facebook over political ads policy
“It is dangerous to describe journalism as political content. Journalism is journalism, and political lobbying is political lobbying. To conflate the two is an extremely dangerous precedent, particularly in this era when there are so many question marks about the veracity of news. We pulled out, and we are yet to be convinced that Facebook is taking this issue seriously.”
Facebook / Tess Lyons
An update from Facebook on its fact-checking program
Its third-party fact-checking program is currently in 14 countries and will expand to more over the course of this year, Facebook says (the option to fact-check video and photo content on the platform will expand to four countries): “These certified, independent fact-checkers rate the accuracy of stories on Facebook, helping us reduce the distribution of stories rated as false by an average of 80 percent.”
Instagram / Kevin Systrom
Instagram launches IGTV, a longform vertical within its app
“IGTV is different in a few ways. First, it’s built for how you actually use your phone, so videos are full screen and vertical…When you follow a creator on Instagram, their IGTV channel will show up for you to watch. Anyone can be a creator — you can upload your own IGTV videos in the app or on the web to start your own channel.”
Nieman Reports / Krista Kapralos
Why it’s important for local journalists to be the ones reporting local news
“It is possible for a piece of information to be accurate, but not true…That’s one reason why every reporter at Global Press Journal is from the community on which she reports: When you speak the local language and understand local customs, the information you gather is filtered in a culturally appropriate way.”
ProPublica / David Eads
Teamwork makes the dream work, according to ProPublica
“Instead of rushing competing stories into publication, they decided to combine their efforts. The result: a Pulitzer Prize.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Karen K. Ho
Testing out a new future for Consumer Reports
” In 2007, CR had more than 8.5 million subscribers across five titles. By May 31, 2017, CR’s subscription numbers had fallen even more to 3.6 million print and 2.9 million online, a three-year decline of more than one million subscriptions and a drop of more than $31.8 million in subscription revenues between June 1, 2014 and May 31, 2017.
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.