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Brazil’s Nexo Jornal sticks to its founding principles: Explanatory journalism, subscribers, and no ads
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Brazil’s Nexo Jornal sticks to its founding principles: Explanatory journalism, subscribers, and no ads
“We realized that context and explanation, we should take those things to an almost radical level.”
By Shan Wang
Press Patron is getting readers to pay what they want for news — with an average one-time contribution of nearly NZ$50
This crowdfunding startup wants to be the bridge between declining advertising revenues and paywalls with low conversion rates.
By Christine Schmidt
Inside, the collection of industry newsletters, continues to bet on email, the “largest social network”
Closing in on a year, the company founded by serial entrepreneur and investor Jason Calacanis now has around 300,000 subscribers across 30 newsletters, and average open rates just above 40 percent.
By Shan Wang
With Facebook Watch, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram hopes to attract more viewers to local videos
“Watch is appealing because it’s not just about getting as many of those singular people watching, but also developing a community of people intrigued by the content who want to watch together.”
By Ricardo Bilton
New York City makes the claim that it’s the podcast capital of the world (but is that a good thing?)
Plus: Another daily news podcast — this time from Vox and Midroll, Radiolab controversy, and are there too many celebrity podcasts?
By Nicholas Quah
Newsonomics: Lessons for the news media from Charlottesville
“The New York Times, The Washington Post, and ProPublica, among others, have risen to the national occasion. But they can’t be expected to grapple with the real, transcendent issues state by state, community by community.”
By Ken Doctor
“OK, I need to do something about this”: The Uncharted Journalism Fund is funding stories that wouldn’t be told otherwise
“If people would like to replicate it elsewhere, we would be happy to support them in exploring that idea.”
By Christine Schmidt
A survey of independent media in the South asks if “movement journalism” can help newsrooms better cover social justice strife
“We think that we need more coverage of people who are taking action to change their lives for the better, more reporting that sheds light on the forces they are up against.”
By Christine Schmidt
Remember that Norwegian site that made readers take a quiz before commenting? Here’s an update on it
For one thing, people did really, really badly on the quizzes (although that could be due to a language barrier).
By Christine Schmidt
There is a darker side of Westerners writing about foreign fake news factories
Plus: Crimea’s News Front; the fate of online trust; Facebook stops saying “fake news.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Brazil’s Nexo Jornal sticks to its founding principles: Explanatory journalism, subscribers, and no ads
“We realized that context and explanation, we should take those things to an almost radical level.”
By Shan Wang
Press Patron is getting readers to pay what they want for news — with an average one-time contribution of nearly NZ$50
This crowdfunding startup wants to be the bridge between declining advertising revenues and paywalls with low conversion rates.
Inside, the collection of industry newsletters, continues to bet on email, the “largest social network”
Closing in on a year, the company founded by serial entrepreneur and investor Jason Calacanis now has around 300,000 subscribers across 30 newsletters, and average open rates just above 40 percent.
What We’re Reading
Current / Tyler Falk
New study dives into public radio habits of millennials
“Several interviewees said they use the NPR News app; awareness of NPR One, ‘tends to be low,’ the report said. Many of the millennials use apps from local stations, but only for streaming, with less awareness of other features offered by the apps.”
CNNMoney / Brian Stelter
‘Vice News Tonight’ has breakout moment with Charlottesville coverage
“Thanks to HBO, YouTube and major television networks, the footage has now been seen by tens of millions of people. Some, like my mom, have been introduced to the Vice brand for the first time.”
The Verge
Facebook will soon purge video clickbait from the News Feed
“Publishers that rely on these intentionally deceptive practices should expect the distribution of those clickbait stories to markedly decrease,” says Facebook.
Mashable / Jason Abbruzzese
Cheddar inks distribution deals with iHeartRadio, SiriusXM, TuneIn, and Amazon Alexa
“This puts us in every connected car in the United States. We are now like the cable news network legacy players with full audio simulcast. Except we are on all the top internet platforms for doing this. You can drive to work and listen to Cheddar,” says CEO Jon Steinberg.
Fast Company
Why the Amazon Echo Show won’t bring up Charlottesville (or bad news in general)
“For those who are glued to the news, the aloofness of these “trending topics” might seem strange or even off-putting, as if Amazon prefers blissful ignorance to an informed public. You don’t see Apple, Google, Microsoft, or Facebook shying away from serious stories in their own news products, so why is Amazon doing it?”
Business Insider / Maxwell Tani
Mic is laying off staff as it prepares for a pivot to video
Several staffers have already taken to Twitter to announce their layoffs.
Poynter / Benjamin Mullin
In a few hours, The Marshall Project raised a five-figure sum from its new membership program
Some background here on how it approached building out its membership program, which seeks to unite readers around a specific issue, criminal justice.
VentureBeat / Stephanie Chan
A new virtual reality fake news game from grad students at Carnegie Mellon
Project Axon was built to raise awareness about how people’s behaviors on social media platforms can contribute to the spread of fake information.
IJNet / Shenaz Kermalli
How this new Iranian fact-checking site encourages accountability
“Fact Nameh picks significant statements made by high-ranking Iranian officials or politicians each week and ranks them on a ‘truth’ meter. Ratings range from 100 percent accurate to half true (or misleading) to downright false. Each rating is accompanied by an article explaining how the statement’s truthfulness was assessed. To add a humorous, visual element to their fact-checking, Fact Nameh accompanies their posts with an illustrated character who acts as an impartial ‘judge’: Mirza.”
Digiday
How Fusion Media Group plans to expand its commerce content
“Using reader trust as a foundation, executive editor of commerce Shane Roberts is looking to expand in two different directions. The first, a Facebook group in which readers can share and discuss deals they find across the internet, is all about nurturing the community of deal-conscious people that have been drawn to Kinja Deals.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.