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How BBC Persian is using Instagram and Telegram to get around Iranian censorship
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How BBC Persian is using Instagram and Telegram to get around Iranian censorship
“This is a social circumvention strategy rather than a social media strategy.”
By Joseph Lichterman
Think The Wirecutter invented affiliate revenue? Meet the mom who’s been doing it since 2010
Lucie’s List has 360,000 subscribers and pulls in enough revenue to support a family and a staff in San Francisco.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Howard University decides it won’t sell its public TV station in the FCC spectrum auction
Meanwhile, efforts continue in New Jersey to get stations to commit their earnings from the auction to local news initiatives.
By Joseph Lichterman
“A threat to society”: Why a German investigative nonprofit signed on to help monitor hoaxes on Facebook
“This ‘news’ is there to influence the political process in Germany, and we think it’s very important to put them straight.”
By Shan Wang
Newsonomics: Craig Newmark, journalism’s new Six Million Dollar Man
The Craigslist founder has given to Wikipedia and Poynter, with more to come: “I do think a trustworthy press is mission critical for any democracy.”
By Ken Doctor
In a chaotic presidency, Civics 101 is giving listeners a reintroduction to how the U.S. government works
New Hampshire Public Radio’s Civics 101 and The Washington Post’s Can He Do That? are helping to contextualize Trump’s presidency for those who don’t have much background knowledge.
By Ricardo Bilton
Dropped by NBC, Boston’s WHDH is placing a big bet on local news and aims to be “DVR-proof”
Spurned by a network that wanted to own its own station in the market, WHDH has responded by offering 87 hours of local news a week. (Plus “Family Feud.”)
By Laura Hazard Owen
No mugshot exploitation here: The New Haven Independent aims to respect the reputations of those arrested in the community it covers
The news site has an unusual policy on crime reporting: No names or mugshots of those arrested unless they’re public figures, the arrest is judged to be a public emergency, or its reporters are able to interview the accused directly.
By Shan Wang
Reply All gets a movie deal (with Robert Downey Jr.), and Spotify is on the hunt for original shows
Plus: First Look Media’s launches a new Richard Simmons podcast, Stitcher goes premium, Spotify looks into original podcast content, and Radiolab goes remix.
By Nicholas Quah
The New York Times’ latest VR project is an adaptation of George Saunders’ new novel
“In terms of mass distribution at this point, newspapers are the only ones that have the muscle.”
By Joseph Lichterman
An Ann Arbor magazine created a daily newsletter to help fill gaps in the city’s local news coverage
The Ann is working with 17 groups — from student newspapers to the local public library — to share local news and information.
By Joseph Lichterman
Newsonomics: The new Knight-Lenfest initiative gives a kick in the pants to America’s metro newspapers
“We have so valued the fact that we are still standing. ‘Look we’re still standing!’ But standing is not enough…you gotta run.”
By Ken Doctor
With “Burst Your Bubble,” The Guardian pushes readers beyond their political news boundaries
The column, which curates right-of-center perspectives for the site’s left-of-center audience, “gets across the idea that the divergence in values in this country is real and persistent.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
How BBC Persian is using Instagram and Telegram to get around Iranian censorship
“This is a social circumvention strategy rather than a social media strategy.”
By Joseph Lichterman
Think The Wirecutter invented affiliate revenue? Meet the mom who’s been doing it since 2010
Lucie’s List has 360,000 subscribers and pulls in enough revenue to support a family and a staff in San Francisco.
Howard University decides it won’t sell its public TV station in the FCC spectrum auction
Meanwhile, efforts continue in New Jersey to get stations to commit their earnings from the auction to local news initiatives.
What We’re Reading
Spiegel Online / Fabian Reinbold
Facebook is having some trouble finding news outlets to partner with on its factchecking efforts in Germany
The investigative nonprofit CORRECT!V was the first to sign on to help monitor hoaxes and misinformation on the platform, “but the search for partners is more difficult than expected for Facebook. The company recently received many cancellations from German media, according to Spiegel — and the test phase of the project has still not begun. (via Google Translate).
New Hampshire Union Leader / Staff
New Hampshire station WBIN-TV ends news programming after selling its broadcasting rights in an FCC auction
The station, which sold its television broadcast rights in the FCC’s spectrum auction for $68.1 million, said Friday it ‘will cease broadcasting in the coming months,’ and that ‘as a result of this sale, we will be making major new investments in our radio and digital businesses.’ (WBIN-TV laid off nearly all of its staff, reportedly without warning, on Friday morning.)
Reuters / Jessica Toonkel
Newspapers aim to ride ‘Trump Bump’ to reach readers — and also advertisers
“For example, there is a heightened understanding in the wake of November’s election that if a brand buys an ad in The Huffington Post, for example, it could be perceived as supporting a liberal agenda.”
Backchannel / Lauren Bohn
Syrian history is unfolding on WhatsApp
Social media is offering a lifeline for fractured families  —  and a window into the refugee crisis.
The New York Times / Jim Rutenberg
In the Trump era, censorship may start in the newsroom
Last week, a PBS station in San Antonio pulled from the air a segment by longtime journalist and commentator Rick Casey (Casey had criticized Republican Representative Lamar Smith comments about “getting your news directly from the president” being the only way to get the “unvarnished truth”).
Bloomberg / Gerry Smith
BuzzFeed tries to break readers out of their social-media bubbles
“The idea is an attempt to get readers to understand — or even acknowledge the existence of — the viewpoints of people who don’t think like them. BuzzFeed’s “Outside Your Bubble” feature will appear at the bottom of its widely-shared articles. A BuzzFeed staffer will curate different opinions from Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, blogs and elsewhere with help from data tools, Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith said in an interview.”
Poynter / Benjamin Mullin
New York Times fans sponsored 209,000 student subscriptions in 8 days
“Donations to the program, which began on Feb. 9, have ranged from $4 to $20,000, according to an announcement from The New York Times. More than 100 contributions came from international sponsors even though the program only serves U.S. public schools.”
Global Editors Network / Évangéline de Bourgoing
Hacking the Facebook news problem
A sampling of new tools that help bring factchecks to readers more directly, or help insert some ideological diversity into readers’ news feeds.
The Atlantic / Adrienne LaFrance
The Mark Zuckerberg manifesto is a blueprint for destroying journalism
“A sprawling new manifesto by Zuckerberg, published to Facebook on Thursday, should set off new alarm bells for journalists, and heighten news organizations’ sense of urgency about how they—and their industry—can survive in a Facebook-dominated world.”
Digiday / Lucinda Southern
Ad blocking is now a chronic but manageable condition
“Ad blocking, which was once treated as a mortal threat to publishers, has now become a chronic condition: They might die with it, but they’re more likely to have been killed by other causes.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.