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With its Facebook Watch news show, Alabama’s Reckon wants to make a national audience care about local news
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What news leaders learned at the 2018 Institute for Nonprofit News conference
Finding funding and telling stories that sell were the two big topics at the conference.
By Marlee Baldridge
With its Facebook Watch news show, Alabama’s Reckon wants to make a national audience care about local news
More Facebook Watch news shows are on the way — but is the effort worth it for all local publishers?
By Christine Schmidt
There’s a big difference between the number of people who worry about fake news and who say they’ve actually seen it
Plus: Facebook looks to hire “news credibility specialists,” and Reuters tries to figure out if highly partisan sites are gaining traction in and outside the U.S. (it looks as if they’re not).
By Laura Hazard Owen
After years of growth, the use of social media for news is falling across the world
But messaging apps are picking up the slack, the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism finds in its 2018 Digital News Report.
By Laura Hazard Owen
In the U.S., the left trusts the mainstream media more than the right, and the gap is growing
As Facebook moves to privilege “broadly trusted” sources in its News Feed, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism research shows that broadcasters and newspapers are more trusted than digital-born outlets across a number of countries.
By Antonis Kalogeropoulos and Richard Fletcher
For the World Cup, livestreamed online video is threatening to score the equalizer on traditional TV
In both the U.S. and China, more people say they’ll watch matches via live video online than via terrestrial, cable, or satellite television.
By Shan Wang
“Did you even READ the piece?” This startup wants to make that question obsolete for commenters
The battle against the uncivil comments section is also a battle against high bounce rates for reallyread.it.
By Christine Schmidt
Civil promises that you don’t have to care about blockchain to care about what it’s doing (also, its first newsrooms just launched)
But beyond the crypto talk, how to actually pay for journalism very much remains an unsolved problem.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Grow the pie: Podcast revenue seems to be growing fast enough for everyone to get a slice
Plus: Google’s latest table-stakes move, Stuff You Should Know sets a record, and In The Dark keeps blowing up.
By Nicholas Quah
Canada’s The Logic is a new subscription news outlet focused on the innovation economy, à la The Information
“Is it a tech story? Is it a business and tech or policy and politics story, is it a cultural story? Well, it’s actually all the above: The impact of technology on the cognitive, economic, and political ways we live is quite transformative.”
By Shan Wang
In the hunt for sustainability, DocumentCloud and MuckRock are joining together as one organization
“It’s a much better problem to have: How are you going to make those all work together, rather than how are you going to make it work at all.”
By Christine Schmidt
Americans think the news industry is “headed in the wrong direction,” but what does that even mean?
People are increasingly trustful, however, of their own preferred news outlets.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Newsonomics: Why is Michael Ferro slowing down Patrick Soon-Shiong’s deal to buy the LA Times and San Diego Union-Tribune?
“Any would-be scenarios involving Tronc include odd tradeoffs, weird valuations, and questions of sheer feasibility.”
By Ken Doctor
With its Facebook Watch news show, Alabama’s Reckon wants to make a national audience care about local news
More Facebook Watch news shows are on the way — but is the effort worth it for all local publishers?
By Christine Schmidt
There’s a big difference between the number of people who worry about fake news and who say they’ve actually seen it
Plus: Facebook looks to hire “news credibility specialists,” and Reuters tries to figure out if highly partisan sites are gaining traction in and outside the U.S. (it looks as if they’re not).
After years of growth, the use of social media for news is falling across the world
But messaging apps are picking up the slack, the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism finds in its 2018 Digital News Report.
What We’re Reading
MPR News / Nancy Yang
The raccoon that climbed the MPR building in St. Paul is now helping to support public radio
New members will receive a commemorative tote bag for a donation. While the funding strategy might not be totally sustainable, it’s certainly memorable.
International News Media Association (INMA) / Shelley Seale
Micropayments bring in new readers, activate subscribers for Winnipeg Free Press
“The biggest benefit we’ve really seen from micropay is that it lowers the commitment. What we created was this pattern of behaviour — it was a pretty high wall to cross, when the reader just wanted that one next story. Commitment is a big barrier, too; it’s not just the money. That notion that I’m going to be tied to something, I’m going to have to cancel later.”
Quartz / Justin Sablich
Obsess over the history of news tickers
“261,925,664: Flashes per hour from the 14,800 bulbs that displayed scrolling news headlines on the Times Square ‘zipper.'”
The Verge / Jacob Kastrenakes
AT&T finishes acquiring Time Warner, becoming a massive media conglomerate
“The $85 billion deal puts the many massive media properties owned by Time Warner — including HBO, Warner Bros., and CNN — under the ownership of one of America’s largest internet, TV, and phone service providers. It creates a whole mess of potential conflicts of interest when it comes to content favoritism, with opponents of the deal drawing concern around AT&T’s ability to promote its own shows and movies over those of other companies.”
Digiday / Jessica Davies
French media plan to meet with the government over Google-GDPR concerns
“France’s five main trade bodies representing publishers, advertisers, agencies and ad tech vendors are set to meet June 15 with Mounir Mahjoubi, France’s secretary of state for digital, said Bertrand Gié, president of Geste and digital director of national newspaper Le Figaro.”
Journalism.co.uk / Marcela Kunova
BBC News Labs and The Telegraph are including AMP Stories in their World Cup coverage
the BBC’s early research shows that users enjoy the simplicity of the experience, while the developers appreciate the relative simplicity of implementing it.
TechCrunch / Anthony Ha
Nuzzel’s new ranking system scores news sources on “authority”
“Nuzzel is joining the Trust Project and the Credibility Coalition, and it’s also partnering with NewsGuard and Deepnews.ai.”
Poynter / Taylor Blatchford
More TV stations than ever are running local news
Almost one-third of stations added a newscast to their schedules in 2017; the majority of stations kept their lineups the same, with only 5 percent cutting a newscast.
Columbia Journalism Review / Sam Thielman
Media companies have been doing a lot of shopping, here’s the breakdown
“And with this latest ruling, [Richard J. Leon, the judge who approved AT&T’s purchase of Time Warner] hasn’t just paved the way for more vertical integration; he’s raised the barrier to entry in the media world to the size of B-movie monsters.”
BuzzFeed News / Craig Silverman
A fact-checker hatched an elaborate scheme to catch a site that was stealing his stories
“Then Schenk went a step further and created a blog called the Honey Pot Times and uploaded a George Lucas death hoax. ‘I know [Rice] likes to steal stories about death hoaxes, so I created one for him,’ he said.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.