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Why are digital newsrooms unionizing now? “This generation is tired of hearing that this industry requires martyrdom”
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Why are digital newsrooms unionizing now? “This generation is tired of hearing that this industry requires martyrdom”
“These are professional-class jobs paying working-class wages, and these people have working-class worries about being downsized, laid off, cast aside in a market that is really stripped down.”
By Steven Greenhouse
The New Humanitarian (no longer an acronymed UN agency) wants to move humanitarian crisis journalism beyond its wonky, depressing roots
“It’s one thing to have been an internal information center for an international NGO. It’s another thing to become a full newsroom, and an independent newsroom at that — it’s not a switch you turn on and off.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Research from Canada suggests journalists’ creed can withstand government support
Social psychologists have demonstrated a significant link between people’s behavior, their values, and the norms of their milieu, and that they feel rewarded when they act consistently with their beliefs.
By Heather Rollwagen and Ivor Shapiro
With vast records of police misconduct now public, California news outlets are collaborating instead of competing
“All Californians have the right to this information. By pooling resources, we can expedite the public’s right to access misconduct and deadly use-of-force materials.”
By Joshua Benton
50,000 first-time donors? Here’s how four nonprofit organizations used NewsMatch to the fullest
“The biggest takeaway for us is there is a pool of donors there that was untapped, and now we realize they do exist.”
By Christine Schmidt
Look for the union label (it’s coming to a podcast company near you)
Plus: Dystopian corporate podcasts, Slow Burn wins an Ellie, and why a weekly release schedule can be a recipe for burnout.
By Nicholas Quah
Pittsburgh local news site The Incline finds a new home at WhereBy.Us
The news comes a couple of weeks after The Incline’s previous owner, Spirited Media, said it was selling off its local news sites.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Facebook enters the news desert battle, trying to find enough local news for its Today In feature
Starting in May, Facebook will also solicit ideas for ways to build community through local news, looking for around 100 participants to receive funding and mentorship.
By Christine Schmidt
Is the business model for American national news “Trump plus rolling scandals”? And is that sustainable?
An interview with researcher C.W. Anderson: “You do have to wonder how long we can keep up before people have a nervous breakdown.”
By Lívia Vieira
Can our corrections catch up to our mistakes as they spread across social media?
Even the best reporters eventually get something wrong. This experiment tried to use the tools we use to spread our stories to spread our mea culpas.
By Dan Gillmor
A European movement encourages Facebook and Twitter to contact every person who has seen fake news
Plus: Pro-China accounts on Reddit, and same-day election misinformation.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Why are digital newsrooms unionizing now? “This generation is tired of hearing that this industry requires martyrdom”
“These are professional-class jobs paying working-class wages, and these people have working-class worries about being downsized, laid off, cast aside in a market that is really stripped down.”
By Steven Greenhouse
The New Humanitarian (no longer an acronymed UN agency) wants to move humanitarian crisis journalism beyond its wonky, depressing roots
“It’s one thing to have been an internal information center for an international NGO. It’s another thing to become a full newsroom, and an independent newsroom at that — it’s not a switch you turn on and off.”
Research from Canada suggests journalists’ creed can withstand government support
Social psychologists have demonstrated a significant link between people’s behavior, their values, and the norms of their milieu, and that they feel rewarded when they act consistently with their beliefs.
What We’re Reading
The New York Times / Julia Jacobs
The new Gawker will not be “Gawker 2.0”
New editor Dan Peres: “In the later years they probably took things too far. There was a lot of gratuitous meanness and sort of misguided decision-making…There’s an opportunity to draw on the great things that they did and dismiss some of the not-great things that they did.”
TechCrunch / Anthony Ha
Former Recode editor Dan Frommer is launching a $200/year email newsletter
It works out to about two bucks per email. “Frommer is launching a new publication, The New Consumer — an umbrella term he’s using to describe the changing landscape in e-commerce, online advertising and direct-to-consumer brands. The goal, he said, is to become the first thing that industry executives read in the morning.”
Motherboard / Caroline Haskins
Animated videos dominate the kids YouTube space. Humans are trying to compete against YouTube’s algorithm
“‘It’s difficult for channels like mine to compete with them too, because they can do like two three videos a day, or at least a few a week,’ Mike Moore, who runs Brain Candy TV—an animated learning channel with 186,000 subscribers—told Motherboard in a phone call.’ It takes me a month or two to make a video. You don’t get as much watch time from that.'”
Recode / Peter Kafka
Apple will unveil a “Netflix for news” Monday (but isn’t going to compete in the actual Netflix space)
“One thing Apple won’t do is unveil a serious competitor to Netflix, Hulu, Disney, or any other entertainment giant trying to sell streaming video subscriptions to consumers. Instead, Apple’s main focus — at least for now — will be helping helping other people sell streaming video subscriptions, and taking a cut of the transaction.”
Global Editors Network / Sinead Boucher
How Fairfax Media’s New Zealand division processed covering the Christchurch attacks
“On Friday, we paused comments sitewide, both to prevent inappropriate material being published and so that our staff could focus fully on reporting the unfolding story.”
The New York Times / Rebecca Corbett and Dean Murphy
How The New York Times decides what to investigate
“If the premium outcome is like, ‘Oh my gosh, I’m falling off my chair,’ then you start calculating the likelihood you are going to get there, what kind of resources you are going to need and do we have the necessary people?”
Poynter / Rick Edmonds
The American Journalism Project has raised $42 million. Here’s the plan for distributing it
“Wrinkle No. 1: though the objective is to create much more high-impact ‘mission-driven’ reporting on state and local governance, the grants will be for ‘revenue raising and tech capacity,’ Thornton said.”
Wall Street Journal / Cara Lombardo and Lukas I Alpert
A debt specialist indicates Digital First could raise the funds needed to pay for its attempted Gannett takeover
“Gannett in a statement called the letter from Oaktree ‘highly conditional’ and said it ‘does not alter the company’s assessment of MNG’s proposal.'”
The Verge / Vlad Savov
Stadia is about the future of YouTube, not gaming
“From a gamer’s perspective, YouTube is the lever that Google will lean on to stir interest in its nascent game-streaming platform, but from Google’s point of view, the new game-streaming platform (hugely ambitious as it may be) is a necessary measure to keep YouTube where it is today.”
The New York Times / Mike Isaac
Apple News’ new paid service reportedly features the Wall Street Journal — while The New York Times and the Washington Post opt out
“The deal’s terms have caused some publishers to recoil, as a 50 percent cut is higher than the 30 percent that Apple usually takes from apps and subscriptions sold through its App Store.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.