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Can Canada build its own independent podcast industry in the True North strong and free?
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Can Canada build its own independent podcast industry in the True North strong and free?
Plus: Everybody’s suddenly making podcasts for kids, a show reveals itself as part-fiction in its grand finale, and mixing podcasts and dating apps.
By Nicholas Quah
Here are three tools that help digital journalists save their work in case a site shuts down
“So many people who work professionally on the Internet really don’t know, until too late, that their work is this fragile.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Village Media, relying on local advertisers, seems to have found a scalable (and profitable) local news model
“We have to find new and creative ways to not replace a client’s Google and Facebook spend but find our own portion of it.”
By Christine Schmidt
Three years in, Discourse Media looks to membership to power its national expansion
The Canadian news industry “has been in a long, slow, painful decline, and people are ready for solutions and to see something new.”
By Christine Schmidt
Bad news from Mashable, BuzzFeed, and Vice shows times are rough for ad-supported digital media
The rapid growth of Google and Facebook continues to take its toll on digital media companies.
By Ricardo Bilton
Asking members to support its journalism (no prizes, no swag), The Guardian raises more reader revenue than ad dollars
The Guardian revamped its ask and its membership offerings — moving from 12,000 members in the beginning of 2016 to 300,000 today.
By Christine Schmidt
Beating the 404 death knell: Singapore news startups struggle to cover costs and find their footing
Political news reporting doesn’t seem to be holding up well as a business in the city-state. And it’s even harder when you’re seen as “alternative” media.
By Sherwin Chua
Newsonomics: A call to arms (and wallets) in the new era of deregulation and bigger media
First Sinclair and now the Kochs are back. In an age of media free-for-all and massive deregulation, will fact-based journalism become an endangered species?
By Ken Doctor
The Trust Project brings news orgs and tech giants together to tag and surface high-quality news
“The hope is that, if news organizations are more clear and transparent about what they’re doing, then users can make their own decisions.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Kickstarter’s new product, Drip, lets people charge subscriptions for ongoing projects
The platform focuses on ongoing support rather than one-time projects.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Students: Spend the summer working with Nieman Lab via the Google News Lab Fellowship
The tech giant is offering opportunities for students to work with eight different journalism organizations next summer, including us. The deadline to apply is January 15.
By Joshua Benton
From Nieman Reports: The news industry has a sexual harassment problem. #NowWhat?
It’s not simply about preventing sexual harassment; it’s about also acknowledging that this is often a part of a sexist and unequal work environment.
By Katherine Goldstein
Can Canada build its own independent podcast industry in the True North strong and free?
Plus: Everybody’s suddenly making podcasts for kids, a show reveals itself as part-fiction in its grand finale, and mixing podcasts and dating apps.
By Nicholas Quah
Here are three tools that help digital journalists save their work in case a site shuts down
“So many people who work professionally on the Internet really don’t know, until too late, that their work is this fragile.”
Village Media, relying on local advertisers, seems to have found a scalable (and profitable) local news model
“We have to find new and creative ways to not replace a client’s Google and Facebook spend but find our own portion of it.”
What We’re Reading
Digiday / Lucia Moses
“Jack of all trades, master of none”: Why Mashable flamed out
“‘It came from Pete on down — ‘What’s going to be our version of Ben Smith?'” a former insider said. “‘They got Ben Smith, so we need someone,'” said another, describing the philosophy. “‘They started BuzzFeed Studios; let’s start Mashable Studios.’ I’m surprised they didn’t call it ‘MashFeed’ at some point.'” But as an ex-editorial staffer said, the pivot to general news made Mashable a ‘jack-of-all-trades, master of none. Everyone was aware BuzzFeed was beating us on stuff, and the tech pubs didn’t take us seriously.'”
Washington Post / Brian Fung
What to know about the FCC’s upcoming plan to undo its net neutrality rules
“With its final meeting of the year less than a month away, the Federal Communications Commission is expected to reveal the latest details of a plan to roll back the government’s net neutrality regulations this week. The result could reshape the entire digital ecosystem by giving Internet providers more control over what their customers can see and access online and how quickly they can do it.”
Slate / Caroline Albanese and David Stern
Slate will launch a redesigned site with a better ad experience in 2018
“After we launch the new site in 2018, there will be no more ads along the right-hand side of Slate. (Ads that appear in line with content ensure higher engagement rates.) Ad-insertion logic will be based on word counts, rather than on paragraphs, to ensure that the share of pixels on any given page that is devoted to ads is consistent.”
HuffPost / Ryan J. Reilly and Christopher Mathias
A freelance journalist swept up in mass arrests at protests at Trump’s inauguration faces his criminal trial today
“A photojournalist facing a criminal trial on several felony charges sounds like something that would happen in another country. So this article is written in the style that would be used if it did.”
Crain's Chicago Business
Crain’s Chicago Business is shutting down its comments section, citing a lack of resources to curtail comments from trolls and hate speech
“Simply put, we do not have the personnel to manage this commentary, to keep it civil and fair and to halt the back and forth before it devolves into invective, name-calling and, in too many cases, outright hate speech. We’d rather not play host to these often anonymous commenters. They drive out more civil readers and potential commenters. They sully our content, our brand and our sponsors. So, to borrow a phrase, we’re draining the swamp.”
Twitter / Rafat Ali
A recognition of the good news in media companies
“The jig is up on platforms and despite their death grip, that may be the best news of all in media.”
Vox / Laura McGann
New York Times White House correspondent Glenn Thrush’s history of bad judgment around young women journalists
“He kept saying he’s an advocate for women and women journalists. That’s how he presented himself to me. He tried to make himself seem like an ally and a mentor.”
The New Yorker / Emily Gould
An unabashed appreciation of Smitten Kitchen, the ur-food blog
“Today, almost all of the personal blogs that began in the early aughts are gone, but Smitten Kitchen remains. Not only does it remain: it thrives; it grows.”
Democracy Fund / Josh Stearns
News Match, “largest grassroots fundraising campaign for nonprofit journalism ever,” announces more funding partners
“In ten other states, individual donors and local foundations have stepped up with challenge grants to encourage people to give to nonprofit news, adding at least another $500,000 to support quality journalism this year. In total, more than 20 foundations, corporations, and individual donors are offering matching challenges, most of which were developed independently by local leadership at nonprofit news organizations.”
MediaShift / Heather Bryant
How the ‘Paradise Papers’ set the bar even higher for global collaboration
“ICIJ’s custom tool, Global I-Hub, again played a central role in connecting journalists. Described as a ‘Facebook for journalists,’ the proprietary software served as a secure space for reporters to share things they had found in the data, note quotes and plan coverage. Hamilton says GoTo Meeting was another common tool to connect editors via video chat to talk things out when meeting in person wasn’t feasible. On the data side, the work benefitted from ICIJ’s expanded data team. Linkurious was used to track and display connections between entities in the data. Hamilton says the hardest part early in the project was just getting the data into a workable shape to share with partners.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.