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Business realities are impacting all college newspapers. But what happens when they’re for-profit?
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Business realities are impacting all college newspapers. But what happens when they’re for-profit?
Gannett owns two college newspapers in Florida — it’s closed one and cutting costs at the other.
By Joseph Lichterman
Where does local TV news fit in the digital age? Tegna, a year separated from Gannett, has some ideas
“By following the lead of our employees to create content that is digital first, it frees them up from the sameness of format that is plaguing local television news.”
By Shan Wang
Report: The New York Times is expanding to Australia and Canada
Having faced some difficulties with an earlier era’s attempts in large non-English markets, the Times is turning its focus next to more familiar territory.
By Joseph Lichterman
Hot Pod: Can a political podcast avoid being overtaken by events?
Plus: Vox Media’s making moves in audio, more podcast/broadcast partnerships, and the importance of sound design.
By Nicholas Quah
Why this Mexican sports site is experimenting with as many new story formats as it can
From Facebook-only verticals to Telegram bots to an in-house Snapchat imitator, Juanfutbol is trying to thread the needle between social distribution and site loyalty.
By Joseph Lichterman
It’s time to apply for a Knight Visiting Nieman Fellowship
The Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard wants to hear your idea for making journalism better. Come spend a few weeks working on it in Cambridge. Deadline: October 14.
By Ann Marie Lipinski
Fusion’s newsletter strategy trades automated feeds for human curation and reporters’ voices
“There’s a thematic through-line and a coherence that you get from reading the intro and the email all the way through. This is not something you’re going to create by just sending out a email RSS feed or using an algorithm.”
By Ricardo Bilton
What it takes to manage a daily popup Snapchat channel from the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio
A dozen producers from BuzzFeed are working around the clock to curate the channel, with access to NBC footage.
By Shan Wang
“It’s a little bit of a crazy concept”: Three women’s newsletters on the decline of the glossy magazine
How the perceived lack of authenticity in women’s magazines is leading readers (and writers) to personal newsletters.
By Taylyn Washington-Harmon
Business realities are impacting all college newspapers. But what happens when they’re for-profit?
Gannett owns two college newspapers in Florida — it’s closed one and cutting costs at the other.
By Joseph Lichterman
Where does local TV news fit in the digital age? Tegna, a year separated from Gannett, has some ideas
“By following the lead of our employees to create content that is digital first, it frees them up from the sameness of format that is plaguing local television news.”
Report: The New York Times is expanding to Australia and Canada
Having faced some difficulties with an earlier era’s attempts in large non-English markets, the Times is turning its focus next to more familiar territory.
What We’re Reading
Reuters / Maurice Tamman
How Reuters built an interactive polling tool that lets users fine-tune turnout projections and create scenarios for the 2016 race
“The Reuters/Ipsos States of the Nation project combines a massive online survey that gauges support in every state for the two main presidential candidates with the ability to set different turnout rates for a variety of demographic groups. The tool then runs millions of simulations to project how those factors translate into votes in the Electoral College.”
The Wall Street Journal / Steven Perlberg
Sports Illustrated and Fox Sports are teaming up to take on ESPN
SI and Fox Sports “will share ‘significant’ content, according to Rich Battista, president of Time Inc. Brands.” On the business side, “ad sales units from Sports Illustrated and Fox Sports will be able to sell advertising across both entities, and the two companies will share in the revenue. They declined to disclose specific financial details.”
Digiday / Jessica Davies
CNN is going after Africa’s young, mobile audience — starting with Nigeria
“On the social side, CNN has already dropped its three separate Africa Facebook pages — created for three of their TV shows: ‘Inside Africa,’ ‘African Voices’ and ‘Marketplace Africa’ — to create one Africa Facebook page. Within a few weeks, the new page has pulled in 250,000 followers, 10,000 joining in the last week.”
AP / Lauren Easton
The AP has a new iPhone app
“The free app lets users personalize their news experience in a big way so they can stay on top of breaking stories of special interest to them. They can do this by customizing their news feed, choosing to follow specific topics and newsmakers as they appear in developing stories…and setting up news alerts by subject.”
WAN-IFRA / Brian Veseling and Ralf Ressmann
Want advice on a youth media strategy? Turn to Africa
“We find that the younger groups are brand- and platform-agnostic; they want information now and fast, so we have to be everywhere to reach them. We found that the constant engagement is also extremely important, as the younger audience is switched on ALL the time.”
WAN-IFRA / Ingrid Cobben
How a Danish startup is building a community that’s willing to pay for news
“After a €80,000 crowdfunding exercise à la De Correspondent, Zetland attracted another €1.5 million from investors, on top of half a million in government subsidies. Revenue comes from subscriptions, live shows and a moderator/booking-business.”
The Information / Cory Weinberg
Facebook’s new plan to expand its ad network (including with major publishers)
“Some of its new targets for mobile ad sales are large publishers such as USA Today and Hearst, which have started selling ads through Facebook Audience Network after plugging into the social network’s fast-loading article-hosting platform, Instant Articles.”
The New York Times / John Herrman
Inside Facebook’s (totally insane, unintentionally gigantic, hyperpartisan) political-media machine
“While web publishers have struggled to figure out how to take advantage of Facebook’s audience, these pages have thrived. Unburdened of any allegiance to old forms of news media and the practice, or performance, of any sort of ideological balance, native Facebook page publishers have a freedom that more traditional publishers don’t: to engage with Facebook purely on its terms. These are professional Facebook users straining to build media companies, in other words, not the other way around.”
Insider / Nicholas Carlson
Here’s Gawker’s style guide from 2007
“In it, you will see why the internet reads like it does today.”
MediaShift / Jason Alcorn
Most newsrooms monitor digital metrics, but many aren’t acting on the data they collect
A high percentage of respondents surveyed by the Engaging News Project, including editors and publishers, couldn’t even answer whether or not they were using A/B testing in their newsrooms.
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.