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Maybe the future of American news publishing is…Europe? (and other bleak ad-related scenarios)
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Maybe the future of American news publishing is…Europe? (and other bleak ad-related scenarios)
“How do we produce business models which will support durable, robust journalism? Or do we just give up on the idea that advertising is the right model?”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Atlas Obscura is using virtual reality to transport readers to the world’s distant, exotic locations
From VR to AR, emerging mobile technology is going to have a significant impact on how the site engages with its readers in the real world.
By Ricardo Bilton
A big week for tech blowback: Regulation, broken promises, and Facebook victimhood
Among many weeks of bad press for the big tech companies, this week stands out.
By Ricardo Bilton
The Honest Ads Act would force Internet companies to change their disclosure practices by January 2018
Plus: A former Russian troll speaks out; a definition of disinformation; Wikitribune’s preferred news sources.
By Laura Hazard Owen
From Nieman Reports: The powers and perils of news personalization
News personalization could help publishers attract and retain audiences — in the process making political polarization even worse.
By Adrienne LaFrance
In the Arab media world, politics is in the spotlight. This site is breaking the mold by using music as its lens
As a site focused on independent music, the five-year-old Ma3azef.com still has limited competition — and is trying everything from new print products to multi-country live music festivals.
By Ramsey Tesdell
“Fierce urgency of now”: This year-long project aims to fill the gap on inequality reporting in Memphis
“Memphis is a microcosm of what’s going on in a lot of urban centers around the country. It’s an extreme example of what happens when things go wrong and and aren’t fixed for a long time.”
By Shan Wang
Matter’s first post-election class: a focus on inclusion, activism, and even security
In the Trump era, Matter says its mission to build a “more informed, empathetic, and inclusive society” is more vital than ever.
By Ricardo Bilton
Newsonomics: The Daily’s Michael Barbaro on becoming a personality, learning to focus, and Maggie Haberman’s singing
“To be a Times reporter is to be in some ways a raconteur, right? A lot of the journalists here are great, great storytellers at a bar…I think The Daily taps into that great oral tradition of journalists, enthusiastically talking about a story in a way they’re excited about, and it gets people excited about it.”
By Ken Doctor
Panoply’s Pinna might just be the first really interesting attempt to get people to pay for podcasts
Plus: 60dB goes to Google, waiting (and waiting) for Apple’s new analytics, and the best podcast-related reads of the past few weeks.
By Nicholas Quah
Not a revolution (yet): Data journalism hasn’t changed that much in 4 years, a new paper finds
“Our findings challenge the widespread notion that [data-driven journalism] ‘revolutionizes’ journalism.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Maybe the future of American news publishing is…Europe? (and other bleak ad-related scenarios)
“How do we produce business models which will support durable, robust journalism? Or do we just give up on the idea that advertising is the right model?”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Atlas Obscura is using virtual reality to transport readers to the world’s distant, exotic locations
From VR to AR, emerging mobile technology is going to have a significant impact on how the site engages with its readers in the real world.
A big week for tech blowback: Regulation, broken promises, and Facebook victimhood
Among many weeks of bad press for the big tech companies, this week stands out.
What We’re Reading
Medium / René Pfitzner
How NZZ is using data science to develop better personalized news products
“Contrary to many other personalization efforts in e-commerce or advertisement, our aim at NZZ is not to provide recommendations that are optimized to increase click rates. Rather we have been looking into engineering a personal news stream that upholds journalistic standards. A news stream that can be best defined as a personal news companion.”
New York Times / Brendan Nyhan
Why the factchecking at Facebook needs to be checked
“Facebook’s partnership with fact checkers may be most effective in providing information to the platform’s news feed algorithm, which allows the company to reduce the prominence of articles that fact checkers have rated as false or misleading.”
Medium / Filip Struhárik
In several countries, Facebook is testing putting posts by pages into a separate ‘Explore Feed’ section
In Slovakia, Sri Lanka, Serbia, Bolivia, Guatemala and Cambodia, Facebook appears to be conducting a test in which all posts by pages are moved from the main News Feed to a separate section, “Explore Feed” (only friends’ posts and ads show up in the main News Feed). This is just a regional test, according to a Facebook spokesperson, who didn’t say when the test would conclude.
The Verge / Shannon Liao
BBC will use machine learning to cater to what audiences want to watch
“Through a five-year initiative, the Data Science Research partnership intends to create ‘a more personal BBC’ that can entertain in new ways. Researchers will analyze user data and apply algorithms to get marketing and media insights about audiences’ preferences. The details are vague for now, but the team says it plans to use machine learning on its own digital and traditional broadcasting content to gain new insights.”
The New York Times / Sydney Ember
At BuzzFeed, a pivot to movies and television?
“Matthew Henick’s team of 42 work to develop BuzzFeed articles, lists and videos into movies and television series. Their mission is to help diversify BuzzFeed’s revenue stream: Executives expect that partnerships with production studios may bring in a third of the company’s revenue in the coming years.”
The New Yorker / William D. Cohan
‘Sometimes deep pockets are not enough to save a local newspaper’
In the three years that Alice Rogoff owned the Alaska Dispatch News, which filed for bankruptcy protection in August and resold for $1 million last month, its value declined 97 percent: “Creating indispensable journalism — whether at the local or national level — is not without cost. It does not want to be free. If people aren’t willing to pay for it, like they pay for the Internet or cell-phone service, then it will surely disappear, sometimes right before your eyes.”
Politico / Jason Schwartz
Shunning Trump, the millennial generation does what it once resisted: pay for national legacy news publications
Even The Wall Street Journal — not a paper usually known for being left around dorm rooms — said that it has doubled its student subscribers in the last year. And a spokesperson for the famously staid Economist reported, ‘We are seeing that the 18-24 and 25-34 age groups have been key drivers of new subscriptions.’
Poynter / Kristen Hare
‘It’s on us…the cavalry is not coming,’ says the founder of a new local news project in Detroit
Ashley Woods, of the Detroit Free Press, won a spot in The Information’s accelerator, for her news idea called Detour, an email newsletter and subscription company: “[W]e’re really going to be looking to our audience and our members to help us define what we cover. For an undecided, but low, monthly fee, members will have access to private Facebook groups and Slack channels to talk about the news without trolls.”
The New York Times / Kevin Draper
Why subscriptions-only sports startup The Athletic wants to pillage local newspapers
“I think the sports page has carried local papers for a while, and they don’t treat it well.”
BuzzFeed / James Ball
A suspected network of 13,000 Twitter bots pumped out pro-Brexit messages in the run-up to the EU vote
“The new evidence of botnet activity in the EU referendum raises serious questions for Twitter, including whether the tech giant has any evidence as to who was behind the bots, and whether or not the site was aware of significant Brexit bot activity at the time.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.