Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Publishers claim they’re taking Facebook’s News Feed changes in stride. Is the “bloodletting” still to come?
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Publishers claim they’re taking Facebook’s News Feed changes in stride. Is the “bloodletting” still to come?
“Let’s put the nail in the coffin of chasing clicks and likes.”
By Shan Wang, Christine Schmidt, and Laura Hazard Owen
What (if anything) do Facebook’s News Feed changes mean for fake news?
Plus: Lessons from Bolivia and Slovakia, and what’s the reach of fake news in the EU?
By Laura Hazard Owen
Newsonomics: NPR’s Ross Levinsohn scoop delivers a double blow to Tronc
The Tronc rollercoaster continues: Just as it tries to unveil a familiar strategy (“gravitas with scale”!), its top digital leader’s past catches up with him.
By Ken Doctor
Media companies should open up an HQ2
If it’s good enough for Amazon, why not for news publishers? Trade in your New York rent for a wider, subway-phobic pool of talent.
By Joshua Benton
This California journalism nonprofit is finding hope for the news industry in voices behind bars
Voices of Monterey Bay is amplifying less-heard voices (prisoners, the children of farm workers), building a community base of support, and publishing in both English and Spanish.
By Christine Schmidt
Newsonomics: Inside L.A.’s journalistic collapse
Southern California has gone from five significant daily newspaper companies three years ago to two today. And they’re both in trouble.
By Ken Doctor
“We stepped in and started doing it”: How one woman built an award-winning news outlet from her dining room table
“This is all going on in my apartment. My kids were small and running around, there were always interns here. And then that spring, we were nominated for a really big award.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Cold, hard numbers will drive the stories on this Internet-crawling company’s new media arm
Fintech company Thinknum has lots of interesting data to sell access to. Now it wants to build public-facing stories out of it.
By Christine Schmidt
At The Boston Globe, the editorial pages are looking for new ways to engage readers
“We learned how important it is to have writers and editors and digital producers working collaboratively, near each other. It’s a model for the future.”
By Dan Kennedy
Americans say greater access to news sources is actually making it harder to stay informed
But they’re evenly split on whether or not the news selection algorithms on sites like Facebook and Twitter should be regulated.
By Ricardo Bilton
For news nonprofits, the tax overhaul is bringing new uncertainty about future donations
“For us, it’s rare that someone cites the tax deductibility as a reason for giving. People are supporting us because they’re passionate about what we’re doing. People want to be a part of the community thats supporting us.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Who needs video? Slate is pivoting to audio, and making real money doing it
Plus: WBEZ tries to turn a podcast into a franchise, Science Friday joins WNYC Studios, and Gimlet opens up the HBO playbook.
By Nicholas Quah
If Facebook stops putting news in front of readers, will readers bother to go looking for it?
The idea that the value of a piece of news is defined by likes and comments — that taking in information without getting into a back-and-forth with your uncle about it is somehow unworthy — is actually a profoundly ideological statement.
By Joshua Benton
Publishers claim they’re taking Facebook’s News Feed changes in stride. Is the “bloodletting” still to come?
“Let’s put the nail in the coffin of chasing clicks and likes.”
By Shan Wang, Christine Schmidt, and Laura Hazard Owen
What (if anything) do Facebook’s News Feed changes mean for fake news?
Plus: Lessons from Bolivia and Slovakia, and what’s the reach of fake news in the EU?
Newsonomics: NPR’s Ross Levinsohn scoop delivers a double blow to Tronc
The Tronc rollercoaster continues: Just as it tries to unveil a familiar strategy (“gravitas with scale”!), its top digital leader’s past catches up with him.
What We’re Reading
HuffPost / Lydia O’Connor
The Los Angeles Times votes to unionize
The announcement comes a day after an NPR report uncovered allegations of sexual misconduct against the Times’ publisher and CEO, Ross Levinsohn. Ken Doctor has more on the rising tensions between the newsroom and corporate leadership here.
Digiday / Lucia Moses
As Facebook retreats from publishers, Snapchat is rolling out a publisher charm offensive
“We’re going to push harder and be more proactive with helping you succeed on Snapchat. This means finding more ways we can work together, more ways to support your business goals, and being more proactive with sharing insights and best practices to help your teams improve content quality and reach more of your audience, while continuing the support the team has already been providing.”
The Hollywood Reporter / Natalie Jarvey
Vox is bringing its explainer style to Netflix in a new show
“The untitled series will take Vox.com’s explanatory journalism conceit and turn it into a multi-part series that explores the big questions of today. Each episode will focus on a new topic — from science to politics to pop culture — and will feature interview from experts in the field. Vox co-founder and editor-at-large Ezra Klein is executive producing.”
The New Yorker / Jia Tolentino
The end of the Awl and the vanishing of freedom and fun from the internet
“Blogs are necessarily idiosyncratic, entirely about sensibility: they can only be run by workhorses who are creative enough to amuse themselves and distinct enough to hook an audience, and they tend to publish like-minded writers, who work more on the principle of personal obsession than pay.”
Center for Media Engagement / Emily Van Duyn, Jay Jennings, Natalie Jomini Stroud
Chicagoans are more likely to donate $10 to a free news site than pay a fee of $10 to access news
The report from the University of Texas at Austin’s Center for Media Engagement and City Bureau also found that despite feeling poorly represented by Chicago news media, South and West Side residents are more interested in volunteering to report on a public meeting than North Side/Downtown residents are.
Cheddar / Alex Heath
Snap threatens jail time for leakers
“We have a zero-tolerance policy for those who leak Snap Inc. confidential information. This applies to outright leaks and any informal ‘off the record’ conversations with reporters, as well as any confidential information you let slip to people who are not authorized to know that information. If you leak Snap Inc. information, you will lose your job and we will pursue any and all legal remedies against you. And that’s just the start.”
The Splice Newsroom / Manuel Quezon
With the order to shut Rappler, the Philippine government puts its new weapon against the media on full display
“Rodrigo Duterte had accused the broadcast network ABS-CBN and online news site Rappler of circumventing domestic ownership requirements for mass media when they offered Philippine Depositary Receipts, an investment vehicle that allows foreign investments without the actual sale of shares of stock.”
Mumbrella / Josie Tutty
Australia’s only children’s newspaper Crinkling News set to close
“We are very sorry to say we cannot keep publishing the newspaper with the resources we have,” adding “it will need a much bigger business, government or philanthropy to take all the amazing things we have done together and keep the momentum going.” Our previous story about the paper here.
Solution Set / Joseph Lichterman
How Vox uses Facebook Groups to build community
“Definitely asking yourself hard questions before you start on any project. Do you have the resources to do it? Why do you want to start this group? And what do you want to get out of it? Who will be able to join? Who on your staff will moderate it? What are the community guidelines? The questions can go on and on.”
Digiday / Sahil Patel
Facebook’s News Feed change raises questions for the future of Facebook Watch
“No one’s going to the Watch tab; no one’s going to your Facebook page, either,” said a publishing executive. “And that’s the issue; if our videos are not going to show up in the news feed, how are we going to get people to go over to Watch?”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.