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Notifications every 2 minutes: This in-depth look at how people really use WhatsApp shows why fighting fake news there is so hard
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Notifications every 2 minutes: This in-depth look at how people really use WhatsApp shows why fighting fake news there is so hard
“In India, citizens actively seem to be privileging breadth of information over depth…Indians at this moment are not themselves articulating any kind of anxiety about dealing with the flood of information in their phones.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Facebook probably didn’t want to be denying it paid people to create fake news this week, but here we are
Plus: WhatsApp pays for misinformation research and a look at fake midterm-related accounts (“heavy on memes, light on language”).
By Laura Hazard Owen
How The Wall Street Journal is preparing its journalists to detect deepfakes
“We have seen this rapid rise in deep learning technology and the question is: Is that going to keep going, or is it plateauing? What’s going to happen next?”
By Francesco Marconi and Till Daldrup
Consumers love smart speakers. They don’t love news on smart speakers. (At least not yet.)
People are still much more likely to use smart speakers for music and weather than news. But that could change as news organizations design news briefings specifically for the speakers.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Newsonomics: Can The Correspondent “unbreak news” in the United States?
Ad-free, member-funded, and Dutch: The team behind the breakout success De Correspondent is translating its ideas into English (and Judd Apatow is on board).
By Ken Doctor
25 newsrooms have attempted to bridge divisions — in person. Here’s what they’ve learned
“Whenever you have an individual interaction, a lot of the bluster, a lot of the generalizations, a lot of the group identifications fall away,” one participant in Pennsylvania said.
By Christine Schmidt
So some people will pay for a subscription to a news site. How about two? Three?
New York magazine and Quartz both now want readers to pay up. How deep into their pockets will even dedicated news consumers go for a second (or third or fourth) read?
By Joshua Benton
Pandora wants to map the “podcast genome” so it can recommend your next favorite show
Plus: SNL pokes fun, Conan O’Brien tackles a new medium, and why we need more podcast transcripts.
By Nicholas Quah
The New York Times is digitizing more than 5 million photos dating back to the 1800s
“Ultimately, this digitalization will equip Times journalists with useful tools to make it easier to tell even more visual stories.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Facebook Groups are “the greatest short-term threat to election news and information integrity”
Plus: How “junk news” differs from “fake news,” and LinkedIn gets less boring (but not in a good way).
By Laura Hazard Owen
Notifications every 2 minutes: This in-depth look at how people really use WhatsApp shows why fighting fake news there is so hard
“In India, citizens actively seem to be privileging breadth of information over depth…Indians at this moment are not themselves articulating any kind of anxiety about dealing with the flood of information in their phones.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Facebook probably didn’t want to be denying it paid people to create fake news this week, but here we are
Plus: WhatsApp pays for misinformation research and a look at fake midterm-related accounts (“heavy on memes, light on language”).
How The Wall Street Journal is preparing its journalists to detect deepfakes
“We have seen this rapid rise in deep learning technology and the question is: Is that going to keep going, or is it plateauing? What’s going to happen next?”
What We’re Reading
LION Publishers / Steve Beatty
LION Publishers is broadening its membership criteria and outreach
“Going forward, LION will work intentionally to build the capacity and sustainability of ethnic media, public media, niche publications and university-based local news initiatives.”
Talking Biz News / Chris Roush
Q&A: New WSJ editor Matt Murray focused on great journalism, diversity, younger readers
“When we revamped the leadership team last year, we took into account having greater gender and ethnic diversity. We were criticized internally a few years ago for not having women in leadership roles where they oversaw coverage. Now, in our six key coverage drivers, half of the leaders in the U.S. are women. And half of our bureau chiefs are women”
Columbia Journalism Review / Kyle Pope
What we learned from the CJR newsstand in midtown
“It was notable how many people slowed down, read the ridiculous headlines, and kept walking, assuming they were real. That was an unexpected, but telling, commentary on the news environment we live in.”
J-Source / Peter Goffin
Are community reporters earning reader confidence? Canadians aren’t sure.
“Rightly or wrongly, the media can be treated as a monolith, especially when it comes to the belief that we’re not doing our jobs correctly. There is an onus on the journalists who have the most contact with our audiences to put the industry’s best foot forward.”
Engadget / Mariella Moon
Twitter’s Explore tab starts sorting stories into sections
“Now, when you visit the tab from an iPhone or an iPad, you’ll see sections such as News, Sports, Fun and Entertainment at the top.”
Hapgood / Mike Caulfield
Is media literacy more about knowing to doubt bad information — or to trust good information?
“How the students do this is not rocket science of course. They become more trusting because rather than relying on the surface features and innate plausibility of the prompts, they check what others say — Snopes, Wikipedia, Google News. If they find overwhelming consensus there, or reams of linked evidence on the reliability of the source, they make the call.”
Bloomberg / Gerry Smith
BuzzFeed will tell you what millennials want, for a fee
“[Ben] Kaufman’s 65-person team has generated about $50 million in sales this year from deals combining commerce and advertising, according to a person familiar with the matter…Typically, brands pay BuzzFeed to help develop a product and then agree to spend money advertising on its site. BuzzFeed may also take a cut of the sales.”
Pew Research Center / Aaron Smith
The public isn’t cool with a lot of the things algorithms handle
“58% of Americans feel that computer programs will always reflect some level of human bias — although 40% think these programs can be designed in a way that is bias-free…the public worries that these tools might violate privacy, fail to capture the nuance of complex situations, or simply put the people they are evaluating in an unfair situation.”
NAJA
Native American Journalists Association urges the Muscogee (Creek) Nation to reinstate press freedom
“…the repeal of the free press act is a direct attack on a fundamental Indigenous right…From holding the powerful accountable to disseminating stories of cultural significance, a free and independent Indigenous press supports the goals of tribal nations by providing an open public forum for community voices.”
CNN Business / Brian Stelter
Judge postpones — until Friday — his decision in CNN’s White House lawsuit
“Burnham, who’s been tasked with defending President Trump and several White House aides from CNN and Jim Acosta’s lawsuit, was responding to a hypothetical from Kelly. Burnham said that it would be perfectly legal for the White House to revoke a journalist’s press pass if it didn’t agree with their reporting. ‘As a matter of law… yes,’ he said.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.