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Newsonomics: McCormick Media’s back in the Tronc game, as eyes turn to the TRNC ticker
What will happen to the price of Tronc shares as investors, a good number of speculators among them, assess the post-L.A. Times value of a major daily newspaper chain effectively halved in the deal?
By Ken Doctor
What news leaders learned at the 2018 Institute for Nonprofit News conference
Finding funding and telling stories that sell were the two big topics at the conference.
By Marlee Baldridge
With its Facebook Watch news show, Alabama’s Reckon wants to make a national audience care about local news
More Facebook Watch news shows are on the way — but is the effort worth it for all local publishers?
By Christine Schmidt
There’s a big difference between the number of people who worry about fake news and who say they’ve actually seen it
Plus: Facebook looks to hire “news credibility specialists,” and Reuters tries to figure out if highly partisan sites are gaining traction in and outside the U.S. (it looks as if they’re not).
By Laura Hazard Owen
After years of growth, the use of social media for news is falling across the world
But messaging apps are picking up the slack, the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism finds in its 2018 Digital News Report.
By Laura Hazard Owen
In the U.S., the left trusts the mainstream media more than the right, and the gap is growing
As Facebook moves to privilege “broadly trusted” sources in its News Feed, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism research shows that broadcasters and newspapers are more trusted than digital-born outlets across a number of countries.
By Antonis Kalogeropoulos and Richard Fletcher
For the World Cup, livestreamed online video is threatening to score the equalizer on traditional TV
In both the U.S. and China, more people say they’ll watch matches via live video online than via terrestrial, cable, or satellite television.
By Shan Wang
“Did you even READ the piece?” This startup wants to make that question obsolete for commenters
The battle against the uncivil comments section is also a battle against high bounce rates for reallyread.it.
By Christine Schmidt
Civil promises that you don’t have to care about blockchain to care about what it’s doing (also, its first newsrooms just launched)
But beyond the crypto talk, how to actually pay for journalism very much remains an unsolved problem.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Grow the pie: Podcast revenue seems to be growing fast enough for everyone to get a slice
Plus: Google’s latest table-stakes move, Stuff You Should Know sets a record, and In The Dark keeps blowing up.
By Nicholas Quah
Canada’s The Logic is a new subscription news outlet focused on the innovation economy, à la The Information
“Is it a tech story? Is it a business and tech or policy and politics story, is it a cultural story? Well, it’s actually all the above: The impact of technology on the cognitive, economic, and political ways we live is quite transformative.”
By Shan Wang
In the hunt for sustainability, DocumentCloud and MuckRock are joining together as one organization
“It’s a much better problem to have: How are you going to make those all work together, rather than how are you going to make it work at all.”
By Christine Schmidt
Newsonomics: McCormick Media’s back in the Tronc game, as eyes turn to the TRNC ticker
What will happen to the price of Tronc shares as investors, a good number of speculators among them, assess the post-L.A. Times value of a major daily newspaper chain effectively halved in the deal?
By Ken Doctor
With its Facebook Watch news show, Alabama’s Reckon wants to make a national audience care about local news
More Facebook Watch news shows are on the way — but is the effort worth it for all local publishers?
There’s a big difference between the number of people who worry about fake news and who say they’ve actually seen it
Plus: Facebook looks to hire “news credibility specialists,” and Reuters tries to figure out if highly partisan sites are gaining traction in and outside the U.S. (it looks as if they’re not).
What We’re Reading
ProPublica / Jeremy B. Merrill, Ariana Tobin
Follow-up: Facebook actually isn’t even that good at screening for political ads
“The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit news outlet, [was]promoting one of its articles about financial aid for college students. … For the ad to run, The Hechinger Report would have to undergo the multi-step authorization and authentication process of submitting Social Security numbers and identification that Facebook now requires for anyone running “electoral ads” or “issue ads.” “
Columbia Journalism Review / Marie C. Baca
Facebook’s local push is becoming a shove with its public relation efforts
“During the two weeks he was writing his article, Daniel Kolitz estimates he received an average of three calls, texts, or emails a day from a Facebook spokesman asking if he ‘needed anything.’ At the launch event, he was followed by up to five Facebook employees at all times.”
Pew Research Center / Amy Mitchell, Jeffrey Gottfried, Michael Barthel, and Nami Sumida
How are Americans doing at distinguishing between factual and opinion statements in the news?
“The politically aware, digitally savvy and those more trusting of the news media fare better; Republicans and Democrats both influenced by political appeal of statements.”
Wall Street Journal / Keach Hagey
Katie Couric is joining forces with The Skimm for a video series as its first guest correspondent
“The inaugural project of the expanded Katie Couric Media will be a short-form online video series for digital-media outfit theSkimm that will be sponsored by consumer products giant Procter & Gamble, according to the companies. The series, titled ‘Getting There,’ will feature profiles of accomplished women.”
The Guardian / Jim Waterson
Fears mount over WhatsApp’s role in spreading misinformation
“In Brazil, WhatsApp has been blamed for a yellow fever outbreak after being used to spread anti-vaccine videos and audio messages. In Kenya, WhatsApp group admins have been described as a major source of politically motivated fake news during recent elections. And there are signs that the messaging service is being used as a conduit for misinformation in the UK.”
New York Times / Jaclyn Peiser
Goodbye, Denver Post — hello, blockchain?
Editors from the Denver Post are teaming up with Civil to create The Colorado Sun, another newsroom on the blockchain platform.
Los Angeles Times / Meg James
The L.A. Times is officially in Patrick Soon-Shiong’s hands (and it has its next executive editor)
“‘The last three months has been an amazing experience for me to really learn — I mean on a steep learning curve — about all the elements that are affecting this industry,’ Soon-Shiong said Friday in an interview at the soon-to-be headquarters in El Segundo, just after signing paperwork to finalize the purchase. On Monday, he will wire the money — and then the historic sale will be complete.” Former Time Inc. executive Norman Pearlstine has been named as the executive editor.
Recode / Kara Swisher
Michael Barbaro explains why The Daily podcast doesn’t cover Donald Trump’s tweets
And why “the show does not get made without Google Docs.”
Columbia Journalism Review / Mathew Ingram
Advocates are becoming journalists. Is that a good thing?
“I came to work at Human Rights Watch because I was interested in figuring out what it looked like to have a different financial model and a different trust model for achieving the good that accountability journalism achieves,” says communications director Nic Dawes, the former editor-in-chief of South Africa’s Mail & Guardian, who joined HRW in 2016.
MPR News / Nancy Yang
The raccoon that climbed the MPR building in St. Paul is now helping to support public radio
New members will receive a commemorative tote bag for a donation. While the funding strategy might not be totally sustainable, it’s certainly memorable.
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.