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How much of what local TV stations post to Facebook is actually local? For many, right around half
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How much of what local TV stations post to Facebook is actually local? For many, right around half
Stations in our sample posted an an average of just over 50 percent local content, using an an extremely generous threshold for “local” content.
By Shan Wang
How do you monetize personality? Danish newsletter startup Føljeton has a few ideas
“When they wrote to us on Facebook Messenger to get the subscription, we got the feeling that this marked a big shift in their lives — going from teens to adults.”
By Christine Schmidt
Who’s who in local news: A guide to the biggest brains and bank accounts in the fight for local journalism
Local news consortiums, labs, associations, and more.
By Christine Schmidt
Newsonomics: Still another Tronc drama, as John Lynch re-enters the business
As much of Tronc’s turbulence looks to be clearing, new questions are emerging about who will next lead the big metro chain.
By Ken Doctor
How do HomePod’s meh sales affect Apple’s place in the podcast ecosystem?
Plus: Atlanta Monster racks up downloads, Google wants to double the podcast market, and Caliphate is absolutely amazing.
By Nicholas Quah
Wellness apps, but for news: Can Neva Labs build a news reading experience that feels healthy?
“If you took away advertising from the platforms we have currently, if you took away the need to addict people and harvest their data and keep them refreshing their pages, what would that experience look like?”
By Shan Wang
Saying “I can just Google it” and then actually Googling it are two different things
Plus other findings from a new study’s interviews with that increasingly common creature, the “news avoider.”
By Christine Schmidt
Combine an “editorially responsible” algorithm + political news, and you have Current Status
“I see my role as a sort of reinforcement editor, ensuring that the good stuff is always percolating to the top. Sometimes the news isn’t as neat as an algorithm wants to make it.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Can Facebook beat back the fake news in Ireland’s upcoming vote on abortion?
Plus: What people who like fact-checking are like, a new “digital deception” newsletter, and Facebook expands its fact-checking partnerships beyond the West.
By Laura Hazard Owen
R Vision, a digital news outlet by and for Rohingya people, aims to shed light on crisis
R Vision is run entirely by an ethnic Rohingya staff of about 25 and uses local citizen journalists to get news out from areas where media is denied access.
By James Rose
How much of what local TV stations post to Facebook is actually local? For many, right around half
Stations in our sample posted an an average of just over 50 percent local content, using an an extremely generous threshold for “local” content.
By Shan Wang
How do you monetize personality? Danish newsletter startup Føljeton has a few ideas
“When they wrote to us on Facebook Messenger to get the subscription, we got the feeling that this marked a big shift in their lives — going from teens to adults.”
What We’re Reading
Bloomberg / Nate Lanxon
Lawmakers in the U.K. did not hold back their criticism in front of Facebook’s CTO
“The CTO [Mike Schroepfer] said Facebook ads would be labeled as ‘political,’ and that all promotions would be available to be searched in an archive the social network will keep available for seven years. Data in the archive will also show how many people may have seen each ad, and how much was paid for their display.”
Digiday / Lucia Moses
Unskippable six-second video ads are coming to Snapchat
Digiday also reports that Viacom says it is working with Snap on a multiyear original content and ad deal that would include Snapchat influencers in new and existing shows.
Gothamist
Today, Gothamist is officially back
“After getting shut down last November, Gothamist has been acquired by WNYC, a non-profit institution committed to strengthening local journalism. So far, eight former Gothamist staffers have rejoined the team to bring Gothamist back, and with your support, we hope to make Gothamist a more expansive, resilient publication.”
Bloomberg / Lucas Shaw and Mark Bergen
This is YouTube’s plan to clean up the mess that made it rich
“For years, YouTube has bragged to marketers that its laissez-faire attitude toward video creators was a feature, not a bug. The company was pioneering a form of mass entertainment more democratic, diverse, and authentic than traditional TV, its argument went, because it was unfettered by producers, network executives, or regulators. Its legions of creators fly around the internet with minimal guidance or oversight: Here are the keys to the jumbo jet, kid—knock yourself out. The ensuing string of crashes has grown difficult for its 1.5 billion monthly users to ignore.”
Associated Press / Alexandra Villarreal
College newspapers across US are campaigning to secure their future
“A lot of the time, there’s not a lot of advocacy for student journalists. We want to make sure we’re part of the conversation, too.”
Recode Media / Peter Kafka
How the New York Times reported its Pulitzer Prize-winning story, according to the reporters that did it
“On the podcast, Steel explained how she and Schmidt strategized before every phone call during their months of reporting on O’Reilly. They discussed who should make the call and exactly what to ask, to have the best chances of getting the true story.”
New York Review of Books / Jay Rosen
Why Trump is winning and the press is losing
“I think our top journalists are correct that if they become the political opposition to Trump, they will lose. And yet, they have to go to war against a political style in which power gets to write its own story. There is a risk that they will fail to make this distinction.”
Poynter / Kristen Hare
Three questions for local news teams to ask before starting that membership program
“If people can’t afford to give money, how else could they contribute?”
Global Editors' Network / Freia Nahser
Metrics that matter: A look into what works for Deutsche Welle
“Every broadcaster is interested in the reach and the size of their audience. At the BBC, we went one step further with responsible reach by tracking quarterly what the gender split looked like for each language service, how each service was performing against each other, and then what our gender split looked like overall.”
TechCrunch / Frederic Lardinois
Say hello to the new Gmail with self-destructing messages, email snoozing and more
“The other major new feature in this update is “confidential mode.” The idea here is simple: When you write an email, you can select for how long the recipient will be able to read the email. Recipients will not be able to forward, copy and paste, download or print the content. You can’t stop anybody from taking a picture of the screen of course, but what’s maybe more important here is that if anybody ever hacked the recipient’s account, that email with your confidential information will be long gone.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.