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Media in the Middle East: A new study shows how the Arab world gets and shares digital news
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Media in the Middle East: A new study shows how the Arab world gets and shares digital news
Two-thirds of respondents in the countries studied said they get news from social media every day.
By Everette Dennis
This former hedge fund guy is a one-man nonprofit investigating some of America’s shadiest companies
“You can’t stop these guys from getting rich as hell and doing things, but I can at least have a marker laid out there in the cyber world saying: Hey, take a hard look.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
The future of news is humans talking to machines
That’s the argument of the BBC’s Trushar Barot, who believes voice AI is the biggest technology revolution that the news industry is missing — and that it’s not too late to do something about it.
By Trushar Barot
BuzzFeed’s strategy for getting content to do well on all platforms? Adaptation and a lot of A/B testing
Multiple versions of articles — with different headlines but also of different lengths and using different thumbnail art — are shown to BuzzFeed.com visitors until a winning combination emerges after a couple of hours.
By Shan Wang
You could change your mind. Or maybe (comforting thought!) you could just let Facebook do it for you
Plus: “The year’s most consequential storylines have collided,” the differences between “observational” and direct correction, and one more trip to Macedonia.
By Laura Hazard Owen
With scripted comedy videos, The Washington Post wants to provide “new entry points to the news”
“[The] very difficult task is to figure out how we get people to think of us as a video destination, and that destination does not have to be Washingtonpost.com.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Stopping fake news on social can feel like playing whack-a-mole. This tiny fact-checking operation in India thinks it’s making a small dent
“The impact we’ve made has been noticeable on people in powerful positions, whether it’s politicians or mainstream media. We’ve opened them up, to see that you can’t ignore this, and that’s a good first step.”
By Shan Wang
Small pieces, loosely joined (oh, and a new iPhone): These are today’s key Apple updates for publishers
Apple steps a little closer toward the constellation of devices that follow the smartphone.
By Joshua Benton
Adding a “disputed” label to fake news seems to work, a little. But for some groups, it actually backfires
Labeling only some fake news stories as fake can make some people more likely to believe other fake news that aren’t labeled.
By Shan Wang
Honolulu Civil Beat wants to use its bot to deepen ties with readers (and find some new stories, too)
“We don’t know where this could take us. The goal is to find what potential there is as far as reaching our readers and possibly getting some stories out of it.”
By Ricardo Bilton
Media in the Middle East: A new study shows how the Arab world gets and shares digital news
Two-thirds of respondents in the countries studied said they get news from social media every day.
By Everette Dennis
This former hedge fund guy is a one-man nonprofit investigating some of America’s shadiest companies
“You can’t stop these guys from getting rich as hell and doing things, but I can at least have a marker laid out there in the cyber world saying: Hey, take a hard look.”
The future of news is humans talking to machines
That’s the argument of the BBC’s Trushar Barot, who believes voice AI is the biggest technology revolution that the news industry is missing — and that it’s not too late to do something about it.
What We’re Reading
Columbia Journalism Review / Priyanjana Bengani
What iOS 11 means for news publishers and readers
A look at some of the changes coming to iOS with today’s update.
Axios / Sara Fischer
Live sports audiences are getting older
“The good news: Regional sports networks have had better luck retaining viewers competitor to their national network competitors, reinforcing the importance for fans to see their local teams.”
Google / Simon Rogers
51 percent of news organizations in the U.S. and Europe have a dedicated data journalist
The Google survey also found that 42 percent of reporters use data to tell stories twice or more per week.
Digiday / Jessica Davies
‘We are not going to give up’: German publishers continue war with ad blockers
“It’s one thing if you have users circumventing your idea of how your business works; it’s another thing entirely to have a professional organization earning off that. It’s something we thought as a principle we should do more to address ad blocking now.”
Business Insider / Mike Shields
Vox Media is giving in to programmatic ads
“The digital publisher is the latest company to bend to the wave of using technology to sell ads rather than relying primarily on people-driven sales teams.”
Quartz
Quartz is launching a new daily email newsletter, Quartz Obsession
Quartz Obsession is sent out weekdays at 4 PM; each issue covers a single topic (bitcoin mines, polyester, UN interpreters, the TR-808 synthesizer). The emails experiment with interactivity and each consists of a series of multimedia cards, including images, GIFs, polls, and charts.
The Drum / Jennifer Faull
The Economist ad revenue declines as “the virus” catches up with it
“The magazine raised subscription prices by 20%, which chief executive Chris Stibbs said was “expertly handled” and resulted in ‘little impact on total volume or new starts.'”
Digiday / Shareen Pathak
Amazon reviews have a bot problem
“Multiple small companies report they’re seeing one-star reviews of unverified purchases on their pages that are written with bad grammar, coupled with remarks like, ‘Great product satisfaction guaranteed.’ The problem seems to run across both the first-party and third-party sellers on the platform.”
Financial Times / Lionel Barber
The FT’s Lionel Barber on fake news in the post-factual age
“Right now, the environment is uniquely conducive to fake news because: We live in a world where there are no accepted facts. A world where facts are secondary to opinion. A world where the media landscape has fragmented. A world which has become intensely polarised.”
The New York Times / Paul Mozur, Mark Scott, and Mike Isaac
Facebook navigates an Internet fractured by governmental controls
“As nations try to grab back power online, a clash is brewing between governments and companies…According to a review by The New York Times, more than 50 countries have passed laws over the last five years to gain greater control over how their people use the web.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.