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Newsonomics: Newsprint tariffs are a Black Swan event that could speed up the death of U.S. newspapers
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Newsonomics: Newsprint tariffs are a Black Swan event that could speed up the death of U.S. newspapers
The tariffs increase the cost of newsprint by as much as 30 to 35 percent, though the impact on publishers is highly uneven, with some chains in better shape and the dwindling independents most at risk.
By Ken Doctor
“Angry face” Facebook: Rage now trumps “love” in reactions to legislators’ Facebook posts
“Legislators’ Facebook audiences became much more likely to react to posts with Facebook’s ‘angry’ button in the wake of the 2016 election.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Facebook will take down posts that could cause “real physical harm,” but Holocaust denials (and Pizzagate?) remain okay
Plus: Anger trumps love (in Facebook reactions to legislators’ posts), the most-shared news sources on right-wing social network Gab, and connections between Macedonian teens and U.S. conservatives.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Chance the Rapper, Chance the Philanthropist, and now Chance the Publisher
He marked his purchase of Chicagoist — formerly part of the media empire of Joe Ricketts, whose family owns the Cubs — by beefing with Crain’s Chicago Business.
By Christine Schmidt
The hit podcast In the Dark is bringing “meaningful interactions” — and money — to the investigation
The podcast has found opportunity with a donors-only Facebook group. Its second-season subject Curtis Flowers is still in prison, on death row — so “giving somebody a mug for donating doesn’t feel right.”
By Christine Schmidt
The universe of people trying to deceive journalists keeps expanding, and newsrooms aren’t ready
“It’s going to be a while before we really have an understanding of how we work to combat it beyond the traditional methods that we have used for a few years now.”
By Heather Bryant
The investigations and reporting of BuzzFeed News — *not* BuzzFeed — are now at their own BuzzFeedNews.com
No longer will “Prosecutors Say Accused Russian Agent Maria Butina Appeared To Have Ties To Russian Intelligence” live on the same website as “I’m Upset That Travis Scott Doesn’t Know Kylie Jenner’s Dogs’ Names (UGH).”
By Shan Wang
On a big story like the Helsinki Trump/Putin summit, Google News’ algorithm isn’t up to the task
The algorithm that ranks content can make some truly strange decisions. What set of signals is Google News looking for?
By Rich Gordon
When a link to a news story shows the source of the story, some people end up trusting it less
Not that they can remember the source five minutes later, anyway.
By Shan Wang
News n00bs: The quest for new audiences has taken The Washington Post to the streaming platform Twitch
“It’s like a version of C-SPAN for a younger audience.”
By Marlee Baldridge
Wilson FM, which aims to “elevate podcast aesthetics,” is the first exciting podcast app in a long while
“I’ve always had a soft spot for print design and aesthetics that have a point of view or opinion. But I’ve been working in tech for quite some time and am just tired of this A/B-tested, data-proven, metric-driven design.”
By Nicholas Quah
Dog-eared MP3s: The podcast and book publishing industries are finding new ways to cross-pollinate
Plus: S-Town gets sued, Spotlight goes audio, and a remarkable new podcast player named Wilson FM.
By Nicholas Quah
Amazon Prime Day is the bad-news-free news event we’ve been waiting for this summer
A day where clicking to refresh is fun, not panic-inducing.
By Laura Hazard Owen
A new proposed law would turn drone journalism into a swarm of lawsuits and make it easy to sue over news photography
Imagine if a news photographer at a football game had to get permission from every single person in the stadium before taking a single shot — or else face hundreds of civil lawsuits. That’s what new model legislation wants to bring to public airspace.
By Judd Slivka
Newsonomics: Newsprint tariffs are a Black Swan event that could speed up the death of U.S. newspapers
The tariffs increase the cost of newsprint by as much as 30 to 35 percent, though the impact on publishers is highly uneven, with some chains in better shape and the dwindling independents most at risk.
By Ken Doctor
Facebook will take down posts that could cause “real physical harm,” but Holocaust denials (and Pizzagate?) remain okay
Plus: Anger trumps love (in Facebook reactions to legislators’ posts), the most-shared news sources on right-wing social network Gab, and connections between Macedonian teens and U.S. conservatives.
Chance the Rapper, Chance the Philanthropist, and now Chance the Publisher
He marked his purchase of Chicagoist — formerly part of the media empire of Joe Ricketts, whose family owns the Cubs — by beefing with Crain’s Chicago Business.
What We’re Reading
American Press Institute / Daniela Gerson and Carlos Rodriguez
Ideas for collaborating with media outlets serving immigrant and majority communities
“If the Anglo newspapers’ goal is to reach our community, it has to be by informing them about services, and that’s where I think ethnic media are the ideal bridge.”
Digiday / Lucinda Southern
How the football site Goal has weathered Facebook’s changes
“During the UEFA Euro tournament in 2016, Facebook was the key traffic driver to Goal’s site. Now, less than 10 percent of traffic comes via Facebook, a drop of 30 percent since the beginning of the year when Facebook restricted the sharing of posts that led back to publisher sites. Goal reduced the number of posts linking back to its site while upping the number of video and multimedia posts aimed at increasing engagement.”
The New Republic / Josephine Livingstone
Women’s media in an industry where feminism itself has become a product
“The difference between today’s women’s media scam and yesterday’s is that the advertising is now hiding in ‘native’ content, and the scummy clickbait is packaged better. Instead of sitting in a box next to a trashy article about celebrities, lucrative advertising these days lurks inside content that simulates ethical, feminist journalism.”
Poynter / Daniel Funke
Fact-checkers have debunked this fake news site 80 times. It’s still successfully publishing on Facebook
While its engagement has ebbed and flowed, YourNewsWire hasn’t taken that big of a hit. In 2017, the site only saw its Facebook engagements decrease by less than 2 percent from 2016 — despite publishing about 1,600 fewer articles, according to BuzzSumo. That trend held for the first seven months of 2018 as well, during which YourNewsWire has published nearly 1,500 articles less than the same period in 2016 but only lost about 8 percent of its Facebook engagements.
Recode / Kurt Wagner
WhatsApp will drastically limit forwarding across the globe to stop the spread of fake news, following violence in India and Myanmar
“Globally, users will now be able to forward messages to just 20 people, although that will be limited to only five in India. The previous limit was over 250. WhatsApp is also getting rid of the ‘quick forward’ feature in India, a button next to multimedia messages that made photos and videos even faster to pass along. WhatsApp is calling these changes a ‘test.'”
Full Fact
Who actually reads fact checks? More men than women, based on numbers from fact-checking operations across multiple countries
Full Fact in the UK carried out audience research last fall that showed it consistently reached men more than women. This is backed up by Google analytics: an estimated 60 percent of Full Fact users between January 1 to May 28 of this year were male; 40 percent were female. The imbalance isn’t country-specific: For PolitiFact in the U.S. and Teyit in Turkey, the balance was estimated to be 69 percent male and 31 percent female.
The Membership Puzzle Project / Melanie Sill, Emily Goligoski, Amy Ashida
A cheatsheet for hosting communities of practice (and why there is no cutting corners when convening people)
“Forming a community means challenging engrained models of programming and organizing. Even for MPP.”
Lenfest Institute / Joseph Lichterman
Digging around for new treasures: How the Conversation re-uses archival coverage
“The Conversation’s staff recognizes that readers aren’t coming to the site for breaking coverage, but The Conversation wants its analysis to be relevant to the news cycle and to provide readers — and its publishing partners — with additional context and background on the news of the day. In recent years, The Conversation began looking inward for coverage: If it couldn’t get a fresh story immediately, could it update and re-use what it already has published?”
The New York Times / Michael M. Grynbaum
Facing a hostile White House, reporters try a new tactic: Solidarity
When Sarah Huckabee Sanders refused to answer a reporter’s follow-up question, another reporter gave her his chance: “Hallie,” he said, “go ahead if you want.”
CNBC / Michelle Castillo
Facebook will begin taking down fake news that encourages violence
“Facebook will work with to-be-named outside local and international organizations as well as its own internal image recognition technologies to help spot these types of offensive items. Parties will have to confirm the information is false, and other groups may be asked to weigh in. Although the policy change is upcoming, the company used these principles to remove posts in Sri Lanka alleging Muslims were poisoning food given or sold to Buddhists.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.