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If you’re poor in the UK you get less, worse news — especially online, new research suggests
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If you’re poor in the UK you get less, worse news — especially online, new research suggests
Poorer people are less likely to go straight to a news site, and the researchers found no online news brand that was read by significantly more poorer people than wealthier people.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Fewer mugshots, less naming and shaming: How editors in Cleveland are trying to build a more compassionate newsroom
“I didn’t see how we could justify standing on tradition when it was causing that kind of suffering…It really comes down to: How long does somebody have to pay for a mistake?”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Did Facebook’s faulty data push news publishers to make terrible decisions on video?
Publishers’ “pivot to video” was driven largely by a belief that if Facebook was seeing users, in massive numbers, shift to video from text, the trend must be real.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Civil’s token sale has failed. Now what? Refunds, for one thing — and then another sale
“For those who purchased tokens, first of all, thank you. We’ll offer full refunds.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
Where are the weeklies? Still kicking, Penelope Abernathy’s news desert report says
Of the 1,800 newspapers lost since 2004, 1,700 of them were weekly papers. But it’s not because their audience disappeared — it’s because the papers did.
By Christine Schmidt
“Yelling at her family in public, in your headphones”: Reality TV comes to podcasts
Plus: The state of Slate, Podtrac wariness, and national/local podcast collaborations.
By Nicholas Quah
Will Vox’s new section on effective altruism…well, do any good?
“It came out of a sense that there were some really important topics with impacts on human beings that didn’t get as much coverage in traditional journalism sections and pieces.”
By Christine Schmidt
Chasing leads and herding cats: How journalism’s latest job title — partner manager — works in ProPublica’s newsroom
“In short, we came to think that the collaboration itself was something that needed editing.”
By Rachel Glickhouse
What have tech companies done wrong with fake news? Google (yep) lists the ways
Plus: A woman-oriented fact-checking initiative, and possible problems with California’s media literacy bill.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Trump’s USA Today op-ed demonstrates why it’s time to unbundle news and opinion content
“At a time when both the public and algorithms are trying to understand what journalism means and how to distinguish between news and opinion, publishers should make it more clear what makes journalism special.”
By Eli Pariser
The Outline built itself on being “weird.” But is it weird enough to survive?
“We’re not the enemy. This is a really shitty industry for writers.”
By Laura Hazard Owen
If you’re poor in the UK you get less, worse news — especially online, new research suggests
Poorer people are less likely to go straight to a news site, and the researchers found no online news brand that was read by significantly more poorer people than wealthier people.
By Laura Hazard Owen
Fewer mugshots, less naming and shaming: How editors in Cleveland are trying to build a more compassionate newsroom
“I didn’t see how we could justify standing on tradition when it was causing that kind of suffering…It really comes down to: How long does somebody have to pay for a mistake?”
What We’re Reading
Poynter / David Beard
What newspapers’ podcasts are teaching traditional text reporters
“Fowler was able to extend his one-hour prison interview to a wild 3 1/2-hour conversation. The problem? ‘The tape is horrible, through double-pane glass with a grate at the bottom,’ said Fowler, a Charlotte (North Carolina) Observer reporter who suddenly had to think audio for a seven-part series and seven-episode podcast about Carruth, the onetime Carolina Panthers wide receiver convicted of conspiracy in the 1999 murder of his pregnant girlfriend, Cherica Adams.”
Columbia Journalism Review / David Uberti
Forecasting the midterms: Uncertainty with a chance of finger-pointing
“Across this small but growing cohort of campaign analysis, the marching orders are to avoid any appearance of the sort of certainty given off two years ago.”
The New York Times / Jaclyn Peiser
Lenny Letter has now shut down
“In recent weeks, lawyers representing Lenny Letter had approached potential investors seeking ways to keep it running through the 2020 election, according to an email obtained by The New York Times.”
Poynter / Rick Edmonds
The strange case of the $846 subscription offer to the Kansas City Star
“A couple of months after he declined to pay the $846, a representative of the Star called and asked if he would consider coming back. The offer was three months at $0.50 a day or six months at $1.25 a day. Black declined, fearing that the rates would jump right back up. Finally he suggested $0.75 a day for a year, Black said, which works out to $262.50. The salesperson agreed to that, and home delivery has resumed.”
Wall Street Journal / Georgia Wells and Lukas I. Alpert
In Facebook’s effort to fight fake news, human fact-checkers struggle to keep up
“Out of Factcheck’s full-time staff of eight people, two focus specifically on Facebook. On average, they debunk less than one Facebook post a day. Some of the other third-party groups reported similar volumes. None of the organizations said they had received special instructions from Facebook ahead of the midterms, or perceived a sense of heightened urgency.”
The Daily Beast / Will Sommer
Alex Jones and Infowars are still on Twitter, despite “ban”
“Two months after Jones and InfoWars were supposedly shunned, a number of accounts remain live and tweeting.”
NBC News / Ben Collins and Shoshana Wodinsky
Twitter pulls down bot network that pushed pro-Saudi talking points about disappeared journalist
“Some of the bot accounts tweeted using a hashtag in Arabic that became the top worldwide Twitter trend on Sunday. The hashtag roughly translated to “#We_all_trust_Mohammad_Bin_Salman,” the Crown Prince and putative leader of Saudi Arabia, who has come under international scrutiny following the disappearance of Khashoggi, a columnist for The Washington Post.”
Wall Street Journal / Benjamin Mullin
Publishers say Facebook’s bad metrics *aren’t* to blame for their pivots to video
“‘Mic’s decision to build out a premium video journalism newsroom in 2016 was a result of growing digital video consumption, which has only accelerated across all platforms including social, mobile, web and streaming. It did not have to do with Facebook’s average watch-time metrics,’ a Mic spokeswoman said.”
Digiday / Lucinda Southern
Reader payments now make up 12 percent of The Guardian’s revenue
“Anna Bateson, chief customer officer at The Guardian, said she sees that 12 percent figure rising to around 20 percent of the publisher’s total.”
Journalism.co.uk / Caroline Scott
Financial Times launches a new tool to help “knowledge-hungry” subscribers track their reading
“The tool will track the articles that subscribers read, giving them an indication of the amount of information they have read on a topic, and suggesting further reads to them. It aims to offer subscribers a more ‘satisfying read’, making it easier to find the content they need more quickly.”
Nieman Lab is a project to try to help figure out where the news is headed in the Internet age. Sign up for The Digest, our daily email with all the freshest future-of-journalism news.