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Key links:
Primary website:
byliner.com
Primary Twitter:
@thebyliner

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

Byliner is a publishing start-up that publishes narrative nonfiction e-books and showcases long-form journalism.

Founded in summer 2011 by John Tayman, Byliner has billed itself as a way for long-form journalism to get the attention it deserves. It typically publishes stories longer than typical magazine pieces but shorter than books.

Its publishing arm, Byliner Originals, inked a deal with the New York Times to publish a dozen e-books from its content in 2013, and has also partnered with New York Magazine to publish New York Magazine’s Most Popular.

In 2014, Byliner told its contributors it was struggling financially and was looking to sell.

The Byliner site organizes other works of long-form journalism by author and includes the headlines, source, and first 300 words of the articles it links to, though it has been scrutinized for allowing readers to largely bypass the ads around the original articles.

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Primary author: Sarah Darville. Main text last updated: June 12, 2014.
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New Jersey Newsroom is a news website that covers politics and general-interest news in New Jersey. The site was launched in January 2009 by about 40 journalists, many of them veterans of The Star-Ledger in Newark. It is modestly funded by advertising and made up primarily of contributing writers who work on a volunteer basis.

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