about  /   archives  /   contact  /   subscribe  /   twitter    
Share this entry
Make this entry better

What are we missing? Is there a key link we skipped, or a part of the story we got wrong?

Let us know — we’re counting on you to help Encyclo get better.

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Key links:
Primary website:
cpb.org
Primary Twitter:
@CPBmediaroom

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting is an organization that distributes the federal government’s money to public media organizations.

Founded in 1967, CPB is the main funding source for more than 1,000 public radio and television stations. Its funding supports well-known PBS, NPR, and PRI shows, including PBS NewsHour, Frontline, All Things Considered, and Marketplace.

CPB is also a funding source for future-of-journalism experiments and collaborative projects, like NPR’s Project Argo, which received $2 million from CPB, and Localore, a series of local multimedia projects that received $1.25 million from CPB. NPR’s Code Switch and a number of multi-station Local Journalism Centers have also been funded by CPB.

Peers, allies, & competitors:
Recent Nieman Lab coverage:
Sept. 24, 2020 / Hanaa' Tameez and Laura Hazard Owen
As local news outlets shift to subscription, they wonder: What should Facebook’s role be? — European local news publishers are moving toward publishing less but better and more differentiated content — and they want readers to pay up, according to a study out Thursday from Oxford’s Reuters Institute fo...
Sept. 24, 2020 / JulieAnn McKellogg
The new folks in town are an untapped audience for local news (even if they don’t stay forever) — How do newcomers to transient communities like San Francisco or Washington, D.C. — which land on this list of some of the most transient U.S. cities — discover information, including news, about their new regions? It...
Sept. 22, 2020 / Sarah Scire
Nonprofit news organizations are becoming more diverse, but they still lag behind the communities they cover — The ranks of nonprofit newsrooms are growing as more founders choose community-supported models over dependence on advertising. But are nonprofit newsrooms reflecting the people they want to serve? The INN Index surveyed...
Sept. 22, 2020 / Laura Hazard Owen
Poynter now offers six months of parental leave, putting it on par time-wise with much larger media companies — Companies don’t have to be big for their parental leave policies to be competitive. The Poynter Institute for Media Studies now offers six months of parental leave to birth parents and four months for non–birth p...
Sept. 21, 2020 / Joshua Benton
“Politics as a chronic stressor”: News about politics bums you out and can make you feel ill — but it also makes you take action — Who would buy a product that reliably makes them sad, or anxious, or worried, or overwhelmed? You wouldn’t go to a restaurant you knew made you feel ill, or listen to music that drove you up a wall, or go to a gym ...

Recently around the web, from Mediagazer:

Primary author: Sarah Darville. Main text last updated: July 12, 2015.
Make this entry better
How could this entry improve? What's missing, unclear, or wrong?
Name (optional)
Email (optional)
Explore: Tumblr
Tumblr logo

Tumblr is a microblogging platform created in 2007 by David Karp and Marco Arment and owned by Yahoo. Tumblr is often referred to as a “microblogging” service because its features are designed for simplicity. Though the blogs offer users background themes and other design options, Tumblr is not as customizable as platforms like WordPress or…

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Encyclo is made possible by a grant from the Knight Foundation.
The Nieman Journalism Lab is a collaborative attempt to figure out how quality journalism can survive and thrive in the Internet age.
Some rights reserved. Copyright information »