about  /   archives  /   contact  /   subscribe  /   twitter    
Share this entry
Make this entry better

What are we missing? Is there a key link we skipped, or a part of the story we got wrong?

Let us know — we’re counting on you to help Encyclo get better.

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Key links:
Primary website:
thedaily.com
Primary Twitter:
@daily

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

The Daily was a tablet- and mobile-based, general-interest daily news publication owned by News Corp.

The Daily was launched in February 2011 as the first tablet-specific publication of its kind and was scheduled to cease publishing in December 2012, with its technology and some staff folded into the New York Post. News Corp. initially invested $30 million in The Daily, with a production cost of $500,000 per week and a reported staff of about 120. In May 2011, News Corp. reported losing $10 million on The Daily in the first quarter of 2011, and that the app had been downloaded nearly 1 million times.

By the following year, it was reported to be losing $30 million a year, and “on watch” by News Corp. for possible shutdown at the end of the year. The Daily laid off nearly a third of its staff in mid-2012, dropping its opinion section and cutting back on its original sports reporting.

As of February 2012, it was the highest-grossing iPad app in Apple’s U.S. App Store, but in mid-2011, it was reported to have 120,000 weekly readers, 80,000 of whom were paying — less than a quarter of what News Corp. estimated it needed to break even. A year after The Daily’s launch, those numbers had grown to a reported 250,000 monthly readers, 100,000 of them paying.

The publication costs 99 cents per week or $40 per year. It was launched with a free trial that was extended for nearly two months. During that trial, The Daily’s publisher, Greg Clayman, said the publication had been downloaded “hundreds of thousands” of times.

Shortly after its launch, The Daily was panned for having underwhelming content, for downloading slowly, and for not being connected to the rest of the web. The Daily has mirror web pages for its tablet content, though those pages have no links and cannot be easily accessed from search engines or The Daily’s homepage. During The Daily’s initial trial period, Andy Baio created The Daily Indexed, which collected links to stories in the app, but ended the project after the free trial was complete.

The Daily’s design was also criticized after its launch, though others praised its visual innovation. A Nieman Journalism Lab analysis found a steep decline in the usage of the social media functions in the app, and a number of Daily staffers left the startup shortly after launch.

In the wake of its closing, The Daily criticized again for its extremely large staff and expensive production, as well as lackluster content,  inability to be shared, and its limitation to tablets.

The Daily was launched on the Apple iPad. In early 2012, it released a version for Google’s Android tablet platform and for the iPhone, and later that year, it launched a weekend edition called WKND. It also ventured into custom app publishing.

Peers, allies, & competitors:
Recent Nieman Lab coverage:
July 22, 2020 / Nicholas Quah
“The idea is to have more Serials”: The New York Times acquires Serial Productions and partners with This American Life — On Wednesday, The New York Times formally announced that it will be acquiring Serial Productions, the spin-off studio from This American Life led by Julie Snyder, Sarah Koenig, and Neil Drumming. You might know it as the...
April 15, 2020 / Sarah Scire
Here’s how WBUR raised $1 million in 13 hours with a pledge drive rethought for pandemic times — The coronavirus pandemic and the public’s appetite for local coverage of cases, hospitals, and economic impacts are forcing public radio stations around the country to postpone or transform their spring fundraisers...
Jan. 11, 2019 / Laura Hazard Owen
“Here’s what else you need to know today”: The New York Times launches a flash audio briefing and other voice stuff for Alexa — The New York Times is pushing further into voice products for smart speakers. On Friday, the company announced that it’s launching a weekday flash news briefing called The New York Times Briefing for Alexa-enabled ...
July 31, 2018 / Nicholas Quah
Where should the daily news podcast go from here? (Can we get away from “the commute”?) — Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue 171, published July 31, 2018. Back to the daily grind. Once again, we return to an old hobby horse of mine. What can I say? I find the genre endlessly fascin...
March 27, 2018 / Nicholas Quah
Homepages may be dead, but are daily news podcasts the new front page? — Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue 156, published March 27, 2018. Good morning, all. I’m back from vacation (ha), and we’re back in business. Mostly covering the bigger orgs today ...

Recently around the web, from Mediagazer:

Primary author: Mark Coddington. Main text last updated: December 6, 2012.
Make this entry better
How could this entry improve? What's missing, unclear, or wrong?
Name (optional)
Email (optional)
Explore: Newsweek
Newsweek logo

Newsweek is a newsweekly magazine that was once the second-largest newsweekly in the United States. The magazine is owned by IBT Media, owners of the International Business Times and a company with connections to a controversial pastor named David Jang. It has gone through several owners in recent years: The site had been bought from The Washington…

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Encyclo is made possible by a grant from the Knight Foundation.
The Nieman Journalism Lab is a collaborative attempt to figure out how quality journalism can survive and thrive in the Internet age.
Some rights reserved. Copyright information »