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Newsonomics: Newsprint tariffs are a Black Swan event that could speed up the death of U.S. newspapers
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April 20, 2009, 7:31 a.m.

On the art of saying goodbye

Our colleagues over at the Nieman narrative program have posted the latest edition of their Digest, and it’s got a connection to the kind of stuff we write about here. They look at how two recently closed newspapers, the Rocky Mountain News and the Seattle P-I, memorialized themselves through video.

You can see the videos embedded above and read our colleagues’ Q&As with their creators (Seattle and Rocky). Narrative director Connie Hale also wrote about the videos and the art of the requiem.

POSTED     April 20, 2009, 7:31 a.m.
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