Nieman Foundation at Harvard
What publishers around the world learned by sharing their climate change coverage with each other
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 19, 2009, 3:28 p.m.

Meet the new Nieman Fellows

In case the Lab is your introduction to the Nieman Foundation, we’re actually best known for our annual class of Nieman Fellows. They’re a group of 20-30 top-notch journalists — half American, half from around the world — who get to spend a year studying the subjects of their choices here at Harvard, while being paid. It’s a good gig, trust me. (Back row, sixth from left.)

Today we announced the members of our newest class, who’ll arrive in Cambridge this fall. They survived a very competitive process; we received far more applications than ever before. Lots of great people made the cut, as always, but there are three who might be of particular interest to Lab readers:

Jeff Howe of Wired magazine, who you may remember as the subject of our first Lab Book Club in November;

Kevin Sites, who was a trailblazer in independent reporting online for Yahoo and others; and

Shankar Vedantam of The Washington Post, who will be studying how online social networks might be used to help solve public policy challenges.

I hope I’ll be able to coax them into sharing some of their accumulated wisdom with Lab readers over the year. Meanwhile, if you know any members of the new class, go send them a congratulatory and subtly envious email. And if you’re a journalist who meets the eligibility requirements, it’s never too early to start planning your application. (Deadlines for next year are still a long ways off: December 15 for international applicants and January 31 for Americans. But it’s fun to think about what you’d do with a year at Harvard.)

POSTED     May 19, 2009, 3:28 p.m.
Show comments  
Show tags
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
What publishers around the world learned by sharing their climate change coverage with each other
For the better part of this year, news organizations in the Climate Publishers Network have been republishing each other’s climate change stories in order to expand their coverage of the issue.
Hot Pod: Is “Why doesn’t audio go viral?” the wrong question to ask?
“What Rolltape represents to me is an attempt to carve out a whole new digital space that requests a completely different kind of social interaction: sincerely, thoughtfully, slowly.”
“Why not be all the way in?” How publishers are using Facebook Instant Articles
“If we end up making more money as a publisher, that’s fantastic. I don’t think that’s going to be an afterthought or byproduct; I think there is a way to win from the business perspective.”
What to read next
How one blog helped spark The New York Times’ digital evolution
“I certainly had editors tell me that I shouldn’t be wasting my time on Bird Week. But that was the best part of City Room…We were like unsupervised children.”
572News outlets left and right (and up, down, and center) are embracing virtual reality technology
Among those experimenting is The Wall Street Journal, which plans to open source its 360-degree mobile video and VR technology and hopes to turn VR into more of a mainstay of its storytelling.
502Podcasting in 2015 feels a lot like blogging circa 2004: exciting, evolving, and trouble for incumbents
The same trends we saw a decade ago — professionalization on one hand, platformization on the other — sure seem to be playing out again.
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Fuego is our heat-seeking Twitter bot, tracking the links the future-of-journalism crowd is talking about most on Twitter.
Here are a few of the top links Fuego’s currently watching.   Get the full Fuego ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
Associated Press
Tucson Citizen
The Guardian
New West
Franklin Center
Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism
Center for Investigative Reporting