HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Jacobin: A Marxist rag run on a lot of petty-bourgeois hustle
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
May 19, 2009, 3:28 p.m.

Meet the new Nieman Fellows

In case the Lab is your introduction to the Nieman Foundation, we’re actually best known for our annual class of Nieman Fellows. They’re a group of 20-30 top-notch journalists — half American, half from around the world — who get to spend a year studying the subjects of their choices here at Harvard, while being paid. It’s a good gig, trust me. (Back row, sixth from left.)

Today we announced the members of our newest class, who’ll arrive in Cambridge this fall. They survived a very competitive process; we received far more applications than ever before. Lots of great people made the cut, as always, but there are three who might be of particular interest to Lab readers:

Jeff Howe of Wired magazine, who you may remember as the subject of our first Lab Book Club in November;

Kevin Sites, who was a trailblazer in independent reporting online for Yahoo and others; and

Shankar Vedantam of The Washington Post, who will be studying how online social networks might be used to help solve public policy challenges.

I hope I’ll be able to coax them into sharing some of their accumulated wisdom with Lab readers over the year. Meanwhile, if you know any members of the new class, go send them a congratulatory and subtly envious email. And if you’re a journalist who meets the eligibility requirements, it’s never too early to start planning your application. (Deadlines for next year are still a long ways off: December 15 for international applicants and January 31 for Americans. But it’s fun to think about what you’d do with a year at Harvard.)

POSTED     May 19, 2009, 3:28 p.m.
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Jacobin: A Marxist rag run on a lot of petty-bourgeois hustle
For Bhaskar Sunkara, the success of Jacobin as a magazine is an unlikely means to a political end.
Like it or not, native advertising is squarely inside the big news tent
Maybe it’s just a new iteration on the advertorials newspapers and magazines have run for decades. Maybe it’s a scurrilous devaluation of journalism. Either way, it’s here, and at the highest levels of the business.
n+1: Learning that print and digital can peacefully coexist
A look at how n+1, celebrating its tenth anniversary this year, built its reputation and maintains its business.
What to read next
749
tweets
How a Norwegian public radio station is using Snapchat to connect young listeners with news
“A lot of people check their phones before they get out of the bed in the morning, and they check social media before the news sites.”
723When it comes to chasing clicks, journalists say one thing but feel pressure to do another
Newsroom ethnographer Angèle Christin studied digital publications in France and the U.S. in order to compare how performance metrics influence culture.
680Wearables could make the “glance” a new subatomic unit of news
“The audience wants to go faster. This can’t be solved with responsive design; it demands an original approach, certainly at the start.”
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
Ushahidi
Facebook
The Boston Globe
National Review
San Diego News Network
Next Door Media
American Public Media
New York
Quartz
Reddit
Bloomberg Businessweek
Press+