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In the Arab media world, politics is in the spotlight. This site is breaking the mold by using music as its lens
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April 30, 2012, 11:41 a.m.
Audience & Social
LINK: itunes.apple.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   April 30, 2012

EveryBlock, the Holovaty-founded, Knight-funded, MSNBC.com-purchased neighborhood news-and-data site, updated its iPhone app today to make it easier for people to post questions, photos, or other info from their phone. That fits in well with their 2011 relaunch aimed at moving EveryBlock “from a one-way news feed to a two-way community platform.”

And it’s getting some promotion:

To support the launch of the new application, EveryBlock will run ads in Chicago bus shelters and New York subway stations throughout the month of May. The advertisement bears the headline, “EveryBlock: Fit your neighborhood into your pocket.”

Selfishly, I hope that the move to UGC makes it easier for them to expand beyond their 16 cities: Bostonians one mile from my house get EveryBlock, but here in Cambridge (and any other Boston suburb), we got zilch. (A bit more on the launch here from Appolicious’ Brad Spirrison.)

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