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June 26, 2013, 2:25 p.m.
LINK: techcrunch.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Joshua Benton   |   June 26, 2013

Sarah Perez at TechCrunch reports that Twitter CEO Dick Costolo said the platform was working on “better ways to filter the ‘signal from the noise’ during live events, including something he referred to as a ‘DVR mode.'”

“That ability to track and monitor the moments within an event, either as they happen or to catch up with them, is something we want to enhance,” said Costolo. “We want to make that experience even better, curating the moments within the event, the media from it, and making it that much easier to navigate”…

“We’re not in the business of synthesizing and analyzing,” he said of the data on Twitter. “It’s the journalists and the news organizations in the world who will take all this info and analyze and curate it as they’ve always done,” he explained.

To address the signal from the noise problem, Twitter is experimenting with a new live events tool that aims to keep that “roar of the crowd,” while still highlighting the key moments. Right now, keeping track of live events on Twitter is very basic — you’re essentially just following the tweets in reverse chronological order, the CEO explained.

It’s another instance of the eternal web tension between what’s latest and what’s most interesting. I’m curious to see what they come up with.

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