Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Newsonomics: 10 headlines we may see this fall about the future of news
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Sept. 2, 2014, 2:55 p.m.
Mobile & Apps
LINK: variety.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Justin Ellis   |   September 2, 2014

Reddit has finally made its Ask Me Anything interviews a little more reader-friendly. Today the site released an official Ask Me Anything app for iOS that streamlines the Q&A series for reading and engaging on mobile devices. Users are able to access Reddit’s archive of AMAs and participate in live interviews.

The AMA series has grown in popularity in recent years as politicians, celebrities, and astronauts have submitted themselves to questions from the crowd. But anyone who has tried to wade into an AMA knows that the Q&As can be dense and difficult to read thanks to Reddit’s archaic design.

The app emphasizes readability and accessibility in an attempt to reach new users. It’s a smart idea that allows Reddit a chance to grow while not alienating the site’s more loyal and longstanding readers. This is not the first time Reddit has tried to launch a mobile app, but it comes at a time when the company is exploring ways to grow and find new sources of revenue.

According to Variety, the app is also Reddit’s attempt to reach a growing mobile audience:

In August, 40% of new users came from mobile, five times what it was in the same month three years ago. One-third of page views come from mobile web. How many more are coming in from third-party apps isn’t known.

“We’ve found in the last year or so a huge uptick in people accessing Reddit from the mobile web, and we want to give those folks a great experience,” said Pao.

Show tags Show comments / Leave a comment
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
Newsonomics: 10 headlines we may see this fall about the future of news
From pipes to platforms, overseas to over-the-top, the shifts we’ll see in the remainder of 2015 will set the stage for 2016 and beyond.
FOIA site MuckRock launches new efforts to let users track projects and contribute to reporting costs
MuckRock is also debuting project pages that will highlight groups of FOIA requests and let users follow specific stories.
Do article tags matter? Maybe not for traffic, but publishers are using them to glean insights
Analytics company Parse.ly found that sites are expanding their use of article tags to track sponsored content and control paywall access.
What to read next
2577
tweets
The New York Times built a Slack bot to help decide which stories to post to social media
The bot, named Blossom, helps predict how stories will do on social and also suggests which stories editors should promote.
1310Jo Ellen Green Kaiser: Do independent news outlets have a blind spot when it comes to ethnic media?
The head of the Media Consortium argues that, by defining themselves in opposition to mainstream media, independent progressive outlets miss out on the power of ethnic and community journalism.
1029Newsonomics: 10 numbers on The New York Times’ 1 million digital-subscriber milestone
Digital subscribers are proving to be the bedrock of the Times’ business model going forward. How much more room is there for growth — and at what price points?
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Fuego is our heat-seeking Twitter bot, tracking the links the future-of-journalism crowd is talking about most on Twitter.
Here are a few of the top links Fuego’s currently watching.   Get the full Fuego ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
McClatchy
SF Appeal
Lens
Davis Wiki
USA Today
PolitiFact
Detroit Free Press and Detroit News
Connecticut Mirror
St. Louis Globe-Democrat
MediaBugs
Hearst
Hechinger Report