Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
A Swiss publisher is trying to attract a paying audience with an app sampling stories across publications
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE
Feb. 2, 2016, 9:30 a.m.
Business Models
the information beijing

The Information is offering members a perk: an exclusive trip to “meet the right people” in China

The $399-a-year site covering the tech industry expects subscribers to pay their own way, but promises access to “people only the most well-known execs typically meet.”

Technology site The Information is inviting some of its subscribers to join it on a trip to China next month.

This isn’t a junket. Attendees are responsible for paying for their own travel, lodging, and other costs. (One assumes subscribers to The Information can handle the tab.) What’s in it for them: “several events with well-known entrepreneurs, executives, and investors from China’s largest and most promising technology companies like Xiaomi, Tencent as well as a host of startups.”

“We are working hard to put you in the same room with the people only the most well-known execs typically meet,” Jessica Lessin, founder and CEO of The Information, explained in a post. (Almost all content on the site is behind a paywall, but this post isn’t.)

As you know, we’re very excited about China at The Information. And so, we’re thrilled to invite a small number of our subscribers to join me for a special opportunity for exclusive, on-the-ground access to technology leaders in Beijing the week of March 14, 2016.

We’re looking for a small number of U.S. entrepreneurs, executives and investors to join us to share their experiences on the ground in Silicon Valley or wherever their home base is…As you know, one of the most important things about business travel is meeting the right people…Space is limited to keep the events intimate.

Lessin wouldn’t comment beyond saying that the company is “heads down” preparing for the trip.

The idea of the China trip makes sense for a site that is all about premium access. The Information only publishes two stories most days, “deeply-reported articles about the technology industry that you won’t find elsewhere.” For this, readers pay $399 a year or $39 a month (the China trip is only open to annual subscribers). Members also get access to a private Slack channel, commenting privileges, and special events like a subscriber summit.

Lessin, a former technology reporter for The Wall Street Journal, launched the site in 2013; it now has thousands of subscribers (“multiples” higher than 2,000, Lessin told Business Insider recently).

The site’s business model “totally scales — and it gives us control over how it scales,” Lessin told Digiday in January.

POSTED     Feb. 2, 2016, 9:30 a.m.
SEE MORE ON Business Models
SHARE THIS STORY
   
Show comments  
Show tags
 
Join the 15,000 who get the freshest future-of-journalism news in our daily email.
A Swiss publisher is trying to attract a paying audience with an app sampling stories across publications
Tamedia’s 12-App collects the 12 best stories each day from the company’s 20-plus publications.
What does it take to be a “full-service” digital journalism organization? Ask Discourse Media
“We’ve gone down lots of experimental rabbit holes.”
Spain’s Eldiario.es has 18,000 paying members, and its eye on the next several million
“We have a potential of six million readers. You may not convince all six million people to be your socios, but if you learn more about their interests, you can get closer.”
What to read next
0
tweets
Newsonomics: In the platform wars, how well are you armed?
“Think about platforms as fishing places where you can find large, engaged audiences and build a relationship with them by providing content. Then offer these users some other services off-platform.”
0BuzzFeed is building a New York-based team to experiment with news video
It is the “center of a Venn diagram” between BuzzFeed Motion Pictures and BuzzFeed News.
0Newsonomics: Can a Bezos buddy act help fend off Gannett’s bid for Tribune?
Tribune Publishing’s Michael Ferro says he wants to bring The Washington Post’s Arc CMS to its newspapers. Is that a grasp at credibility or a model for other news companies to outsource their tech stacks?
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Fuego is our heat-seeking Twitter bot, tracking the links the future-of-journalism crowd is talking about most on Twitter.
Here are a few of the top links Fuego’s currently watching.   Get the full Fuego ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
PolitiFact
Tumblr
AOL
The Philadelphia Inquirer & Daily News
Current TV
Google
The Batavian
The Awl
Topix
Financial Times
The Weekly Standard
Mashable