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How can local TV news fix its young person problem? Maybe it needs to look more like Vox
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April 11, 2018, 10:32 a.m.
Audience & Social
LINK: www.newswhip.com  ➚   |   Posted by: Laura Hazard Owen   |   April 11, 2018

NewsWhip is mostly known as a data company that offers social media metrics to publishers, brands, and agencies, but as of late it’s been doing more research into hyperpartisan publishers and fake news — the company recently helped us out with this research, for instance. It’s also partnering with First Draft on its work fighting false information around elections.

Now the company is launching a hub, the NewsWhip Research Center, that will serve as a repository for its research into how social media affects the ways people engage with stories. It’s overseen by Gabriele Boland, NewsWhip’s manager of content strategy and communications.

“We’re seeing a lot of opportunity in helping brands maneuver around junk news and demystify how things are spreading on social media,” Boland said. “We want to go deeper here, whether it’s why fake news is still spreading a year and a half after the election, or why a particular video is going viral — it can range from very serious to very topical.”

The hub is here.

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