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Key links:
Primary website:
cir.ca
Primary Twitter:
@circa

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

Circa is a mobile-only app for reading news that presents stories as collections of facts from various sources.

For its focus on presenting news the way readers want it on their phones—in short chunks, added to as a story changes—Circa has been hailed as an example of the “post-article” news world. Its minimalist design breaks stories up into pieces easily viewable on a phone screen. Users can follow stories of interest and receive updates as new facts, statistics, or images are added. Circa relies heavily on aggregation while using editors to string together the content.

The app was founded by Cheezburger Network’s Ben Huh and launched in October 2012. It released an updated focused on breaking news a year later.

By June 2013, the company employed 14 people producing 40 to 60 stories every day.

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Primary author: Sarah Darville. Main text last updated: June 13, 2014.
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The Bureau of Investigative Journalism is a nonprofit British news organization focusing on investigative reporting on public-interest issues. The bureau was officially launched in April 2010. Its creation was announced in July 2009 as a project of the newly created Investigations Fund, a network of British investigative journalists, and was co-founded by David and Elaine…

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