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Key links:
Primary website:
dailymail.co.uk
Primary Twitter:
@MailOnline

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

The Daily Mail is a British tabloid newspaper with the largest online audience in the world.

Mail Online grew rapidly into one of the most-visited news websites by 2007, when its editors began chasing traffic by posting aggregated news stories, and prioritizing large photo spreads with long headlines to bolster visits. It had reached 154 million unique visitors by late 2013.

Founded in 1896 as a women’s newspaper, the Daily Mail also publishes editions in Scotland and Ireland, and launched The Mail on Sunday in 1982. It opened a New York office to house its online staff in 2011, and much of the Mail Online’s success online has been a result of its growing American audience, which now accounts for a third of all traffic.

In January 2012, the Daily Mail launched an India-specific edition of its website, Mail Online India. That month, MailOnline surpassed The New York Times to become the most popular newspaper website in the world, with over 50 million monthly unique visitors.

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Primary author: Linda Kinstler. Main text last updated: June 12, 2014.
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Slate is an online political and cultural magazine founded in 1996 and currently owned by the Graham Holdings Co. Slate was launched by former New Republic editor Michael Kinsley and initially owned by Microsoft — one of the first online-only publications founded as part of a major corporation or media outlet. Much of Slate’s commentary…

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