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Aug. 13, 2018, 2:26 p.m.
Reporting & Production
LINK: www.niemanlab.org  ➚   |   Posted by: Shan Wang   |   August 13, 2018

Did you know you can read many Nieman Lab stories in Arabic, Chinese, Farsi, German, Japanese, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish?

Over the past couple of years, through the help of many partners, from the likes of IJNet to Yomiuri Shimbun to Outriders to Tencent, we’ve been trying to expand the number of people who can more easily access our reporting on the future of news. You can browse what’s available now over at our brand new translations page here (and let us know if you spot typos, have suggestions, want to help us translate Nieman Lab stories or know someone who can help, or otherwise want to know more). We want to hear from you, whether you’re an individual with translation experience, an established news outlet, a growing media startup, a tech platform with a media portal, or something in between.

If we know about a translation of a Nieman Lab story, you can also find out about it on the English-language version of the page, where you’ll see something like this below the byline:

Nieman Lab’s audience has always been significantly international — roughly half of our readers are outside the U.S. — and from our perch in Cambridge, we can sometimes miss some of the most interesting experiments in journalism going on outside the U.S. We continue to be interested in hearing from freelance writers who know journalism innovation in the parts of the world they’re based in better than we do.

We want to hear your story ideas. Are you starting a journalism project we should be aware of? Is your newsroom testing out something unusual? Is your outlet doing something particularly well, and we should check out how you’ve managed to do it (or was there a flopped experiment, that can serve as a good case study)? Is there a cross-country partnership on fact-checking that we’ve missed? Is there an intrepid media person we should definitely do a Q&A with? What are we missing out on?

And we want to make sure these stories are available in the languages that our readers might prefer to read them in. Do you work for a non-English-language publication that might want to translate and run our stories, either as a one-off or as part of a larger partnership? Can you help us translate what are sometimes pretty wonky pieces of media reporting?

These are all just suggestions — we’re open to lots of ideas. Let us know on Twitter, Facebook, Slack, or via email at translations@niemanlab.org.

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