about  /   archives  /   contact  /   subscribe  /   twitter    
Share this entry
Make this entry better

What are we missing? Is there a key link we skipped, or a part of the story we got wrong?

Let us know — we’re counting on you to help Encyclo get better.

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Key links:
Primary website:
fivethirtyeight.com
Primary Twitter:
@fivethirtyeight

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

FiveThirtyEight is an American political blog, written by Nate Silver and currently hosted by the New York Times, that analyzes polling data.

Originally, the site was launched anonymously in 2008 after Silver had been posting statistical poll analysis as an anonymous diarist at the liberal blog Daily Kos, beginning in late 2007. Silver revealed his identity in May 2008.

FiveThirtyEight grew quickly during the 2008 election runup, and Silver was acclaimed for remarkably accurate predictions of the 2008 presidential election results.

In August 2010, the New York Times’ began hosting Silver’s blog in an effort to “help New York Times readers cut through the clutter of this data-rich world.” It was rebranded as “FiveThirtyEight: Nate Silver’s Political Calculus”. The hosting was part of a three-year deal in which the Times licensed FiveThirtyEight’s content while also providing editorial guidance. Silver also contributes to the print edition of the Times as well as to the New York Times Magazine.

He has written with mixed feelings on the new Times paywall.

Silver, a baseball statistician, uses advanced statistical techniques and historical data to analyze poll data, including an election projection algorithm based on a baseball projection system he created.

Silver has said he started the site to fill in the gaps in data analysis and understanding among political journalists. During the 2008 election, his co-writer, Sean Quinn, supplemented Silver’s analysis with reporting on local campaign efforts. Currently a number of other statisticians, academics and other professionals contribute occasionally to the blog, which often reaches beyond politics into issues of public importance.

Peers, allies, & competitors:
Recent Nieman Lab coverage:
Nov. 15, 2016 / Nicholas Quah
Hot Pod: Did the election podcast glut of 2016 fail its listeners? — Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue ninety-six, published November 15, 2016. Outlook. Last Tuesday’s shocking electoral conclusion has severe ramifications not just for the media generall...
Nov. 8, 2016 / Shan Wang
As seen on TV: For the TV-less viewer, live election night shows abound, on any number of screens — You absolutely, categorically, without a doubt have not seen enough coverage of this election. TV networks are expecting all-time highs in viewership on Tuesday night, the culmination of a presidential election cycle tha...
Nov. 8, 2016 / Nicholas Quah
Hot Pod: Slate tries a rolling audio mashup to cover Election Day live — Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue ninety-five, published November 8, 2016. Happy Election Day (oh dear god). Three quick stories with that sweet, sweet podcast-angle (#onbrand): 1. Avail your...
Nov. 1, 2016 / Nicholas Quah
Hot Pod: Will 60dB’s algorithms and user experience give it a lead over other audio platforms? — Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue ninety-four, published November 1, 2016. Tiny Garage Labs pushed its short-form audio platform 60dB out into the public last week and bagged itself a bit of ...
Oct. 25, 2016 / Nicholas Quah
Hot Pod: What will happen to the election podcast boom on Nov. 9? — Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue ninety-three, published October 25, 2016. “We’re built on top of a foundation that we feel pretty good about,” PRX CEO Kerri Hoffman said. ...

Recently around the web, from Mediagazer:

Primary author: Mark Coddington. Main text last updated: May 11, 2011.
Make this entry better
How could this entry improve? What's missing, unclear, or wrong?
Name (optional)
Email (optional)
Sunlight Foundation  logo

The Sunlight Foundation is a nonpartisan, non-profit institution that seeks to achieve its mission of increased government transparency by funding and building web-based technologies. It was cofounded in 2006 by Ellen S. Miller, a longtime government employee and “advocate for disclosure of campaign finances,” and Michael Klein, a former securities lawyer who donated $3.5 million…

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Encyclo is made possible by a grant from the Knight Foundation.
The Nieman Journalism Lab is a collaborative attempt to figure out how quality journalism can survive and thrive in the Internet age.
Some rights reserved. Copyright information »