about  /   archives  /   contact  /   subscribe  /   twitter    
Share this entry
Make this entry better

What are we missing? Is there a key link we skipped, or a part of the story we got wrong?

Let us know — we’re counting on you to help Encyclo get better.

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Key links:
Primary website:
fivethirtyeight.com
Primary Twitter:
@fivethirtyeight

Editor’s Note: Encyclo has not been regularly updated since August 2014, so information posted here is likely to be out of date and may be no longer accurate. It’s best used as a snapshot of the media landscape at that point in time.

FiveThirtyEight is an American political blog, written by Nate Silver and currently hosted by the New York Times, that analyzes polling data.

Originally, the site was launched anonymously in 2008 after Silver had been posting statistical poll analysis as an anonymous diarist at the liberal blog Daily Kos, beginning in late 2007. Silver revealed his identity in May 2008.

FiveThirtyEight grew quickly during the 2008 election runup, and Silver was acclaimed for remarkably accurate predictions of the 2008 presidential election results.

In August 2010, the New York Times’ began hosting Silver’s blog in an effort to “help New York Times readers cut through the clutter of this data-rich world.” It was rebranded as “FiveThirtyEight: Nate Silver’s Political Calculus”. The hosting was part of a three-year deal in which the Times licensed FiveThirtyEight’s content while also providing editorial guidance. Silver also contributes to the print edition of the Times as well as to the New York Times Magazine.

He has written with mixed feelings on the new Times paywall.

Silver, a baseball statistician, uses advanced statistical techniques and historical data to analyze poll data, including an election projection algorithm based on a baseball projection system he created.

Silver has said he started the site to fill in the gaps in data analysis and understanding among political journalists. During the 2008 election, his co-writer, Sean Quinn, supplemented Silver’s analysis with reporting on local campaign efforts. Currently a number of other statisticians, academics and other professionals contribute occasionally to the blog, which often reaches beyond politics into issues of public importance.

Peers, allies, & competitors:
Recent Nieman Lab coverage:
Nov. 9, 2020 / Michael Schulson
Did the polls fail again? It’s complicated. — Four years ago, polls indicated that then-Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton would handily beat her Republican opponent, Donald J. Trump. Based on those polls, one prominent election forecaster, Princeton Un...
Oct. 15, 2020 / Sarah Scire
To cover voting and all its “subplots” over the next three weeks, FiveThirtyEight turns to a “slower-than-usual liveblog” — From wild conspiracy theories to legitimate growing pains associated with implementing brand-new voting procedures, exactly how Americans will cast their ballots has become a major political story. FiveThirtyEight is pro...
Oct. 7, 2020 / Joshua Benton
Should news outlets stop making election forecasts based on polling data? — At this moment of great division in America, with tempers flaring and tensions high, let us gather together as a people, as a nation, and discuss the one thing we can all agree on: The Atlanta Falcons are hot garbage.1 I...
July 28, 2020 / Joshua Benton
This is how FiveThirtyEight is trying to build the right amount of uncertainty into its 2020 election data analysis — One of the more challenging things to represent in journalism is uncertainty. Walter Cronkite ended his newscasts with “That’s the way it is,” not “That is certainly one possible outcome, given a ...
June 28, 2018 / Christine Schmidt
More than a magic electoral map: How Politico plans its (open source) Slack chats during the midterms — Do you ever wish you could be a fly on the wall of someone else’s Slack channel? FiveThirtyEight fans can read its Slack-like conversations, adding statistical context to current events since 2015 (which political ...

Recently around the web, from Mediagazer:

Primary author: Mark Coddington. Main text last updated: May 11, 2011.
Make this entry better
How could this entry improve? What's missing, unclear, or wrong?
Name (optional)
Email (optional)
Explore: Global Voices
Global Voices logo

Global Voices is a nonprofit international network of bloggers and citizen journalists. The site was launched in 2005 by Rebecca MacKinnon and Ethan Zuckerman while both were fellows at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society. The site grew out of a 2004 international blogging conference. After being run by the Berkman Center for three…

Put Encyclo on your site
Embed this Encyclo entry in your blog or webpage by copying this code into your HTML:

Encyclo is made possible by a grant from the Knight Foundation.
The Nieman Journalism Lab is a collaborative attempt to figure out how quality journalism can survive and thrive in the Internet age.
Some rights reserved. Copyright information »