Nieman Foundation at Harvard
Google announces a $300M ‘Google News Initiative’ (though this isn’t about giving out grants directly to newsrooms, like it does in Europe)
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Articles by Ken Doctor

Ken Doctor is a news industry analyst and the author of Newsonomics: Twelve New Trends That Will Shape the News You Get (St. Martin’s Press). He also runs the book’s companion website, He is an analyst for the research firm Outsell and a regular consultant and speaker. He spent 21 years with Knight Ridder in a variety of roles, including as managing editor of the St. Paul Pioneer Press and as a vice president of Knight Ridder Digital.
Also see results from other Nieman sites
Three possibilities: Tronc merges with Gannett, Ferro tries to take the company private, or — maybe — Tronc begins to act more like a normal company.
Plus: Digital First’s owner gets sued for alleged bad behavior, The Athletic looks to get huge, and Advance newspapers start poking at paywalls.
The company — a giant bet on acquisition, consolidation, and cost-cutting — now owns more than 1 out of 10 American daily newspapers. What it plans to do with them remains unclear.
Does he really want to take on becoming the great consolidator of the American press, conquering once-mighty Gannett? Or will he exit the field — richer, but his ambitions humbled?
West Coast news chaos, a new leader at WordPress, the decline of digital display — and is The Washington Post really profitable?
Tronc is getting a big premium for its flagship asset, and the Times is getting a return to private, local ownership. But a lot of questions remain about where Patrick Soon-Shiong will take his new prize.
As Tronc dispatches yet another leadership team, attention returns to bigger questions about the company’s strategies. Can new editor Jim Kirk soothe the riled-up newsroom?
And why is the Tronc newspaper treating its own newsroom as a group not to be trusted?
The Tronc rollercoaster continues: Just as it tries to unveil a familiar strategy (“gravitas with scale”!), its top digital leader’s past catches up with him.
Southern California has gone from five significant daily newspaper companies three years ago to two today. And they’re both in trouble.