Nieman Foundation at Harvard
HOME
          
LATEST STORY
Chat app Telegram, not much loved by the Russian government, still attracts a loyal readership for news
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE

Articles by Ken Doctor

Ken Doctor is a news industry analyst and the author of Newsonomics: Twelve New Trends That Will Shape the News You Get (St. Martin’s Press). He also runs the book’s companion website, newsonomics.com. He is an analyst for the research firm Outsell and a regular consultant and speaker. He spent 21 years with Knight Ridder in a variety of roles, including as managing editor of the St. Paul Pioneer Press and as a vice president of Knight Ridder Digital.
@kdoctor
Also see results from other Nieman sites
Consider this a roadside guide to accidents of history as evidenced by the collisions between newspapers and Google and Facebook.
Because it’s privately held, Hearst isn’t as big a part of industry conversations around the future of newspapers as its publicly traded peers. But it’s charting a path forward and ready to open its checkbook to expand.
With its business model squarely built around reader revenue, getting users logged in is a critical step toward payment. So the Times is making a “shift from platform to reader.”
“For the first time in the history of the company, and arguably for one of the first times in the history of legacy media, we have the beginnings of a fundamentally integrated approach.”
VGTV, an offshoot of the tabloid Verdens Gang, has benefited from Schibsted’s strategy for innovation: separate the new business from the mothership until it is well established, and then reintegrate it back with the whole.
The Open Brand Safety framework is an attempt to create a master list of fake news sites so advertisers can learn to avoid them.
“Mobility is a crucial factor in our identity. I believe that sort of fundamental optimism of American identity is running out of gas…That fundamentally shifts our national character.”
The Providence Journal has found ways to cooperate with — and benefit from — the successful true-crime podcast.
Seven questions in what’s already been a very strange year.
It’s built a membership-driven model that produces trust, connection, and good journalism. But can it extend that approach to the hurly-burly of the American media market?