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Articles by Ken Doctor

Ken Doctor is a news industry analyst and the author of Newsonomics: Twelve New Trends That Will Shape the News You Get (St. Martin’s Press). He also runs the book’s companion website, newsonomics.com. He is an analyst for the research firm Outsell and a regular consultant and speaker. He spent 21 years with Knight Ridder in a variety of roles, including as managing editor of the St. Paul Pioneer Press and as a vice president of Knight Ridder Digital.
@kdoctor
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Is Tronc’s acquisition of the New York tab a linchpin to a national strategy, or just another declining property to add to its portfolio?
Can it attract a new editor of national stature with digital savvy? Or will continued chaos within Tronc scare talent off?
“The New York Times, The Washington Post, and ProPublica, among others, have risen to the national occasion. But they can’t be expected to grapple with the real, transcendent issues state by state, community by community.”
A step back to look at the news lessons of this summer.
Consider this a roadside guide to accidents of history as evidenced by the collisions between newspapers and Google and Facebook.
Because it’s privately held, Hearst isn’t as big a part of industry conversations around the future of newspapers as its publicly traded peers. But it’s charting a path forward and ready to open its checkbook to expand.
With its business model squarely built around reader revenue, getting users logged in is a critical step toward payment. So the Times is making a “shift from platform to reader.”
“For the first time in the history of the company, and arguably for one of the first times in the history of legacy media, we have the beginnings of a fundamentally integrated approach.”
VGTV, an offshoot of the tabloid Verdens Gang, has benefited from Schibsted’s strategy for innovation: separate the new business from the mothership until it is well established, and then reintegrate it back with the whole.
The Open Brand Safety framework is an attempt to create a master list of fake news sites so advertisers can learn to avoid them.