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How journalists can avoid amplifying misinformation in their stories
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Stories on Reporting & Production

We can design our reporting to be valuable to multiple stakeholders, build on local expertise, uncover areas in need of investigation, and identify opportunities for change.
Plus: How community-centered collaborative journalism really works in a pandemic, the impact of Sinclair on national political views, and the everyday tactics that shape whether young people trust news.
More than 25% of Covid-19 preprints have featured in at least one news article, researchers found, and almost 100% of Covid-19 preprints were tweeted about at least twice.
“During the pandemic, we made all of our content free to smaller, community radio stations that don’t have a news budget.”
Cases abound of how the “Covid-19 excuse” has led to the inability of journalists to do their job of reporting medically endorsed effective public health measures, or to challenge lethal disinformation.
As a scholar who researches media coverage of police and protests, I believe Toledo’s death exposes a blind spot in journalism: a tendency to go with the “police said” narrative without outwardly questioning if it is right.
Readers told the nonprofit local newsroom that they appreciated the option to read an article omitting graphic video and images of 13-year-old Adam Toledo’s death.
“Suddenly, the stupid stuff on the internet, the scary stuff on the internet, became just so mainstream and important. And that totally should not be.”
“Our Chartbeat dial went past the maximum. It went all the way around again.”
The tragedy highlights large news organizations’ flawed approach in covering communities at the margins.