Nieman Foundation at Harvard
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TV is still the most common way for Americans to get local news, but fewer people are watching
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Stories on Reporting & Production

“It’s not a science story for us here in South Florida. It’s not some kind of theoretical exploration. It’s real. It’s what many in our community experience in their neighborhoods.”
“We’re going to do our job — we won’t chill our coverage in any way — but we’re not going to spread hate or misinformation.”
“What I’ve seen with most nonprofits is they’re driven by former print people who have transitioned to digital. I can’t tell you how many times I see a digital story and think it would have been a good 10-minute, 15-minute, hour-long documentary piece.”
“A lot of this is taking advantage of what Google has to offer as a partner. They’re tracking all of these interesting trends all the time: what people are looking for and what they’re missing.”
“We saw opportunity in Rhode Island where quite honestly great newspapers like the Providence Journal were seeing significant cuts and that market is particularly engaged in news.”
“We’ve had a positive response from political parties who now accept that this is how BBC News operates and have been more imaginative in which spokespeople they put up for interview.”
A deep linguistic analysis finds that newspapers today are a lot like newspapers 30 years ago. But TV news — especially cable news — has ramped up the emotion, the conversationality, and the arguing.