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Block Club Chicago offered two versions of the same breaking news story — with and without a horrifying video
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Stories on Reporting & Production

Readers told the nonprofit local newsroom that they appreciated the option to read an article omitting graphic video and images of 13-year-old Adam Toledo’s death.
“Suddenly, the stupid stuff on the internet, the scary stuff on the internet, became just so mainstream and important. And that totally should not be.”
“Our Chartbeat dial went past the maximum. It went all the way around again.”
The tragedy highlights large news organizations’ flawed approach in covering communities at the margins.
“We believe for local news to have a future, it has to be built for people when they truly need information before it is built for people when they are just curious.”
“Those of us who cover the environment know that there are very many of us who are Black or Indigenous, or people of color, but the folks who get the byline at the big magazines, who get the cover stories on climate change are often white older dudes.”
The wire, run via Substack, helps student reporters share knowledge and reporting.
Every aspect of La Brega, from the scripts to the sound design to the original music and illustrations by Puerto Rican artists, was produced in a way that would speak to a Puerto Rican audience.
It gives a framework and place to begin, recognizing that no outreach plan will work for everyone so it’s necessarily an iterative, step-by-step process.
“It is unbelievably complicated to find out what happens in these meetings, even though all the information is online.”