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From newsroom to newsletter: How local journalists are DIYing important coverage via email
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Just as blogging allowed a new cadre of journalists to work outside established news organizations in the early 2000s, the email newsletter boom has done the same in local communities. “This is more than 40 hours a week for far less than minimum wage. To be frank, it’s exhausting. I only do it because it’s so important.”
“With this agreement, I am convinced we have assured the revival of The Times under local ownership.”
“If we’re going to have news that is paid for by audiences, we have to talk about the news that should never be behind paywalls.”
“We needed a product to push out news faster to a consumer, even if it’s just one to two sentence updates.”
“If the Iowa Falls newspaper writes about its hospital for two years, it’s an Iowa Falls problem that Iowa Falls has to solve…And by the time you’re talking about a major region of the nation like that, it becomes a national problem to be solved.”
“Newsrooms generally reported increased levels of engagement and higher-quality conversations with audiences. Nearly all of the grant reports we reviewed reported increased engagement.” That (still) doesn’t yet translate into money.
“I know we’re on the right track, but we need a conductor to keep us on the rails.”
“We know journalism cannot bring about change on its own — but it can be a really effective piece of a bigger movement of actors and events that do bring about change.”
“While local newspapers accounted for roughly 25 percent of the local media outlets in our sample, they accounted for nearly 50 percent of the original news stories in our database.”