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Can U.S. journalism truly serve global audiences? Not if it treats them like an afterthought
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“We all grew up with All the President’s Men. You don’t want to take away from the power of that moment and the press holding the administration accountable. But we have to think, why was there not a Black person or a woman on that team?”
Back in 2012, the spread of outlandish conspiracy theories from social media into the mainstream was a relatively new phenomenon, and an indication of what was to come.
Plus: Sadness-based news sharing, why journalists see audiences as more conservative than they are, and journalists’ community-building on Instagram.
Nearly 75% of Canadian newsrooms are made up of white journalists, and 80% of newsrooms have no Black or Indigenous journalists on staff.
This subtle form of misinformation, which scholars have called “fossil fuel solutionism,” involves cherry-picking data and talking points.
A seminal 2004 study was among the first to investigate the connection between deception rates and technology. What does a 2021 update show?
Users willing to pay $2.99/month can get access to an undo button, a Nuzzel-like “Top Stories” feature, and ad-free articles that will send a portion of revenue back to publishers.
Adobe’s Content Authenticity Initiative is developing tools and standards that allow people to capture, store, and verify key details about a photo — its digital provenance — with an eye toward creating standards that can be used across the internet.
Simply counting instances of misinformation found on a social media platform leaves two key questions unanswered.