HOME
          
LATEST STORY
U.S. journalists, the clock is ticking: January 31 is the deadline to apply for a Nieman Fellowship
ABOUT                    SUBSCRIBE

Download the Lab’s iPhone app

The world of journalism is changing faster than ever.

Want to keep on top of every new business model, every startup, every innovation? That used to take following every website, every RSS feed, every tweet. And it’s hard to do good journalism when you’re locked into TweetDeck all day long.

If you’ve got an iPhone, we think you’ll like our new Nieman Journalism Lab app. It’s free and available for download now.

 

 
Our app is designed to give you a quick look at what people are talking about in the future-of-journalism world. It’s perfect for those quick moments when you’re away from your desk but still want to see what’s going on. Here’s what it offers:

In the Lab: The full text of all our stories here at the Lab, in mobile-friendly form. Scroll through what we’ve been writing, click through on our links — and when you’ve read a piece worth sharing, it’s easy to post it on Twitter, email it to a friend, or open it in Safari.

On Twitter: Our Twitter feed, updated throughout the day, is an essential guide to the most interesting links on the traditional journalism world, new startups, advertising, marketing, and social media.

Hot Links: We’re excited about this one. We’ve curated a list of the most influential corners of the future-of-news Twitterverse and, using the web service Hourly Press, scan through them for the links they’re talking about most. This list of 10 links, updated hourly, is the purest jolt of future-of-news talk online.

Friends of the Lab: Here you’ll find the latest from our sister projects — Nieman Storyboard, Nieman Watchdog, and Nieman Reports — plus some of our other friends from Harvard. Plus, we give you quick and easy access to the public RSS feeds of some of the best sources of journalism news: The New York Times’ media coverage, paidContent, Poynter, MediaShift, Romenesko, Columbia Journalism Review, and Mashable. As always, tap on the headline to get the full story.

Search: Curious what we’ve written about The Guardian, aggregation, Bill Keller, or MinnPost? We’ve got full-text search of the Lab’s archives, so you’re just a few taps away from finding out.

All that in one app, and it’s free.

Give it a download — we hope you like it.
 
 
 

What to read next
2499
tweets
Don’t try too hard to please Twitter — and other lessons from The New York Times’ social media desk
The team that runs the Times’ Twitter accounts looked back on what they learned — what worked, what didn’t — from running @NYTimes in 2014.
716From explainers to sounds that make you go “Whoa!”: The 4 types of audio that people share
How can public radio make audio that breaks big on social media? A NPR experiment identified what makes a piece of audio go viral.
705Q&A: Amy O’Leary on eight years of navigating digital culture change at The New York Times
“In 2007, as digital people, we were expected to be 100 percent deferent to all traditional processes. We weren’t to bother reporters or encourage them to operate differently at all, because what they were doing was the very core of our journalism.”
These stories are our most popular on Twitter over the past 30 days.
See all our most recent pieces ➚
Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
The Daily Show
International Consortium of Investigative Journalists
Outside.in
Spot.Us
Facebook
Hechinger Report
The Daily
Tumblr
Storify
Corporation for Public Broadcasting
EveryBlock
The Daily Voice