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Download the Lab’s iPhone app

The world of journalism is changing faster than ever.

Want to keep on top of every new business model, every startup, every innovation? That used to take following every website, every RSS feed, every tweet. And it’s hard to do good journalism when you’re locked into TweetDeck all day long.

If you’ve got an iPhone, we think you’ll like our new Nieman Journalism Lab app. It’s free and available for download now.

 

 
Our app is designed to give you a quick look at what people are talking about in the future-of-journalism world. It’s perfect for those quick moments when you’re away from your desk but still want to see what’s going on. Here’s what it offers:

In the Lab: The full text of all our stories here at the Lab, in mobile-friendly form. Scroll through what we’ve been writing, click through on our links — and when you’ve read a piece worth sharing, it’s easy to post it on Twitter, email it to a friend, or open it in Safari.

On Twitter: Our Twitter feed, updated throughout the day, is an essential guide to the most interesting links on the traditional journalism world, new startups, advertising, marketing, and social media.

Hot Links: We’re excited about this one. We’ve curated a list of the most influential corners of the future-of-news Twitterverse and, using the web service Hourly Press, scan through them for the links they’re talking about most. This list of 10 links, updated hourly, is the purest jolt of future-of-news talk online.

Friends of the Lab: Here you’ll find the latest from our sister projects — Nieman Storyboard, Nieman Watchdog, and Nieman Reports — plus some of our other friends from Harvard. Plus, we give you quick and easy access to the public RSS feeds of some of the best sources of journalism news: The New York Times’ media coverage, paidContent, Poynter, MediaShift, Romenesko, Columbia Journalism Review, and Mashable. As always, tap on the headline to get the full story.

Search: Curious what we’ve written about The Guardian, aggregation, Bill Keller, or MinnPost? We’ve got full-text search of the Lab’s archives, so you’re just a few taps away from finding out.

All that in one app, and it’s free.

Give it a download — we hope you like it.
 
 
 

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Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
Here are a few of the entries you’ll find in Encyclo.   Get the full Encyclo ➚
Bureau of Investigative Journalism
GateHouse Media
Semana
U.S. News & World Report
Crosscut
Apple
Global Voices
New York
Plaza Pública
La Nación
Instapaper
New Haven Independent