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Articles tagged business model (379)

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Call it a platform, call it a content management system, call it an “umbrella of interconnected services” — the set of tools the Post has built for itself is now being licensed to other publishers, who might find it more useful than their alternatives.
We know what continued ownership by Tribune Publishing looks like for the Los Angeles Times: cuts, cuts, and more cuts. A private, local owner would offer a better chance for sustainable success.
Digital subscribers are proving to be the bedrock of the Times’ business model going forward. How much more room is there for growth — and at what price points?
The quest for one of the world’s top news brands ended with an unexpected winner today. Here’s why.
It depends on whether you think the brighter future for news lies in readers or advertisers paying the bills. But then again, an FT sale may involve as much ego as accounting.
Newspapers were, for decades, a prime example of a community institution, meant to last through the centuries. A new generation of owners is thinking of them more as something to milk for profit on their way down.
At Digital First Media, America’s second-largest newspaper chain, it’s hard to discern a larger plan — beyond painful cutbacks to boost profits.
Can publishers find a sustainable business model this new age of Facebook/Apple/Snapchat/Twitter/Google distributed content? And is local news destined to be left behind?
From video to social, from mobile to paywalls — these data points help define where we are in the “future of news” today, like it or not.
FILE - In this April 17, 2007 file photo, exhibitors work on laptop computers in front of an illuminated sign of the Google logo at the industrial fair Hannover Messe in Hanover, Germany. According to numbers the company released Friday, Oct. 10, 2014, nearly 145,000 requests have been made in the European Union and four other countries by people looking to polish their online reputations. That’s an average of more than 1,000 requests a day since late May, when Google began accepting submissions to comply with a European court decision that ruled some embarrassing information about people’s lives can be scrubbed from search results. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer, File)
Whether they’d do it out of benevolence, fear of regulators, or the quest for a competitive advantage, Google could be of real service to the news industry and the broader cause of journalism. Here’s how.
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What happened after 7 news sites got rid of reader comments
Recode, Reuters, Popular Science, The Week, Mic, The Verge, and USA Today’s FTW have all shut off reader comments in the past year. Here’s how they’re all using social media to encourage reader discussion.
699Facebook woos journalists with Signal, a dashboard to gather news across Facebook and Instagram
Signal helps journalists find, source, and embed content from Facebook and Instagram.
567Facebook rolls out new tools to help reporters share their work (and choose who sees it)
Facebook is making an app that was previously only for celebrities and other public figures available to journalists with verified profiles.
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Encyclo is our encyclopedia of the future of news, chronicling the key players in journalism’s evolution.
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