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Articles tagged business model (401)

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“There’s a lot of context around last summer and Ferguson. This was so much more violent and widespread. I thought it would be interesting to let that unfold to readers, to get a sense of that intensity with how the story is published.”
With its business model squarely built around reader revenue, getting users logged in is a critical step toward payment. So the Times is making a “shift from platform to reader.”
“For the first time in the history of the company, and arguably for one of the first times in the history of legacy media, we have the beginnings of a fundamentally integrated approach.”
The Open Brand Safety framework is an attempt to create a master list of fake news sites so advertisers can learn to avoid them.
“Mobility is a crucial factor in our identity. I believe that sort of fundamental optimism of American identity is running out of gas…That fundamentally shifts our national character.”
Journalists and publishers need to breathe new life into the social contract with readers: The audience holds the media accountable, the media holds the powerful accountable.
Readers have finally understood that their payments for the news will actually make a difference in what they and their community know. That model needs to be extended down to states and cities.
Fake news percentages, numbers of working journalists, declining print ad revenue: 2016 in numbers.
Shows are moving well beyond a simple MP3 file and an RSS feed. But will new data, targeting, discoverability, and social tools push podcasting in the direction of commercial radio? Part 4 of a five-part series on the business of on-demand audio.
Getting revenue directly from listeners is not an immediate priority for most podcast companies. But when payment does arrive, will the money go mostly to producers, networks, or platforms? Part 3 of a five-part series on the business of on-demand audio.