Nieman Foundation at Harvard
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Archives: April 2021

“First and foremost, we respond to an undersupply of quantitative descriptive research in social science. Causal research that asks the question why has largely taken the place of descriptive research that asks the question what.”
“It’s easy for the media and others to dismiss entertainers as just being famous, and whatever they sold was a benefit of their fame — and not necessarily the business insights that came from that.”
A new Reuters Institute report finds that editorial standards and journalistic practices may be less important for trust in news than audience impressions about brand reputations and the look and feel of how information is presented.
Plus: The Kentucky Lexington Herald-Leader’s “Clean Slate” trial, journalism as infrastructure, and the spectacle of anti-Asian violence on Instagram.
“We were changed by the practicalities of the pandemic. But we’re also changed by a radical shift of awareness in journalism of the challenges of covering these events, and the psychological costs to journalists of unremitting stress.”
“Is this post worth your time?” (Or is it at least a picture of people hugging?)
A study that seemed to claim they had was treated as “bad news for journalists: the public doesn’t share our values.” The reality is a few arbitrary research design decisions put a thumb on the scale.
An interview with Sara Yasin, the managing editor of BuzzFeed News.
Cases abound of how the “Covid-19 excuse” has led to the inability of journalists to do their job of reporting medically endorsed effective public health measures, or to challenge lethal disinformation.
There’ll now be a dead-easy way to pay for a podcast on your iPhone. Will there be a market, and is this the end of the open podcasting ecosystem?